Author

Matthew M. Chingos

    Author Website: http://www.urban.org/author/matthew-chingos


    Author Bio:
    Matthew M. Chingos is director of the Urban Institute’s Education Policy Program, which undertakes policy-relevant research on issues from prekindergarten through postsecondary education. Current research projects examine universal prekindergarten programs, school choice, student transportation, school funding, college affordability, student loan debt, and personalized learning. Chingos is an executive editor of Education Next and coauthor of Game of Loans: The Rhetoric and Reality of Student Debt and Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities. His work has been featured in major media outlets and has been published in academic journals, including the Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Before joining Urban, Chingos was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He received a BA in government and economics and a PhD in government from Harvard University.


Articles

The Rich Get Richer

A review of “Dream Hoarders” by Richard V. Reeves

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

The Impact of School Vouchers on College Enrollment

African Americans benefited the most

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Online Learning in Higher Education

Study finds that students enrolled in a large “hybrid” course learned as much as students in a traditional course, at substantial cost savings

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Questioning the Quality of Virtual Schools

NEPC report uses flawed measures

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Grading Schools

Can citizens tell a good school when they see one?

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

For-Profit and Nonprofit Management in Philadelphia Schools

What kind of management does better than the district-run schools?

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Blog Posts/Multimedia

A Promising Alternative to Subsidized Lunch Receipt as a Measure of Student Poverty

Some states are putting in place linked data systems that enable them to identify students who are economically disadvantaged regardless of whether their families fill out a form.

08/20/2018

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

07/06/2018

What Can NAEP Tell Us About How Much U.S. Children Are Learning?

This report presents new analyses of state-average NAEP data that attempt to address the limitation of changing samples of students by following cohorts of students from 4th grade in a given year to 8th grade four years later.

05/29/2018

A Better Way to Compare State Performance on NAEP

Demographically-adjusted data provide important insights into differences in state-level school performance.

04/10/2018

Incremental Steps Toward Bold Student Loan Reforms

Congress can take significant steps in the next Higher Education Act toward designing a system that will better serve both borrowers and taxpayers and generate evidence to support bolder policymaking in the future.

03/19/2018

Simplifying Grants for College Students: Who Wins and Who Loses?

Making federal student aid programs simpler and easier for students to navigate is a key goal of efforts to reauthorize the Higher Education Act .

03/12/2018

What Have We Learned From Three Studies of Private School Choice?

Understanding the effect of private school choice on real-world success beyond test scores requires data on outcomes like college enrollment and graduation, and thanks to three recent Urban Institute studies, we know more about this than we did a year ago.

03/02/2018

Are Low-Quality Private Schools on the Rise in Florida?

A new study finds that participation in the state’s tax credit scholarship program has not shifted toward schools with weaker track records of improving student outcomes.

12/04/2017

Private School Choice Increases College Enrollment in Florida. Could It Work Nationally?

Here’s what we think our new study means—and doesn’t mean—for both state-led and federal efforts to expand school choice.

09/28/2017

Should Congress Take a Page from the Gainful Employment Playbook?

Instead of targeting institutions of higher education, the government should consider targeting individual programs.

07/25/2017

How Progressive is School Funding in the United States?

The fact that overall funding progressivity remains low despite two decades of reforms suggests a troubling lack of progress on equitable funding of public schools.

06/19/2017

Who Could Benefit From School Choice? Mapping Access to Public and Private Schools

The distance families are able and willing to travel may be more important for expanding school choice than the type of school the policy provides access to.

04/03/2017

School Choice Advocates Should Be Worried About Federalizing School Choice

To create a feasible school choice policy, lawmakers would likely need to expand federal involvement in private school education.

03/08/2017

Don’t Let Student Borrowers Off Tax-free

A proposal that would allow employers to help pay off their employees’ student loans tax-free would provide a regressive handout to the wealthiest borrowers.

03/02/2017

Don’t Forget Private, Non-Profit Colleges

The private, non-profit sector may be in a position to contribute even more to the nation’s educational attainment and economic mobility than it currently does.

02/21/2017

Why the Proficiency-Versus-Growth Debate Matters for Assessing School Performance

Secretary of Education nominee Betsy DeVos and Minnesota Senator Al Franken sparred at Tuesday’s confirmation hearing over whether student performance is best measured by proficiency or growth.

01/19/2017

Making College Earnings Data Work for Students

State and federal policymakers have embraced the idea that prospective college students need better information on earnings outcomes for individual colleges and programs of study.

01/03/2017

Private Schools Equally Good at Fostering Civic Participation

A new study confirms earlier ones finding that public schools are not better than private schools at fostering civic values.

11/28/2016

Look to Congress, not Trump, for Leadership on Education Policy

An assertive Congress ignoring or even steamrolling a weak, incompetent White House seems like a plausible outcome in 2017.

11/10/2016

Should Policymakers Make College Free or Better Support Institutions?

Providing the right mix of financial aid and non-financial supports to the students who need them most is a better idea than eliminating tuition for all or most families.

11/07/2016

No More Free Lunch for Education Policymakers and Researchers

For many years, the identification of students who are eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches has doubled as a way for researchers and policymakers to identify students from low-income families.

07/06/2016

School Choice as an Antipoverty Strategy

Even in a time of great political polarization, at least some school choice policies have the potential to foster bipartisan collaboration.

06/15/2016

No Excuses for Stagnant Student Achievement in U.S. High Schools

With graduation rates at an all-time high, , but federal achievement data indicate that these students likely have no better math or reading skills than their parents did.

06/09/2016

Does Gentrification Explain Rising Student Scores in Washington, DC?

Our new analysis shows that demographic change explains some, but by no means all, of the increase in scores.

05/25/2016

How Do States Really Stack Up on the 2015 NAEP?

The declines in NAEP scores from 2013 to 2015 are unlikely to be explained by shifts in student demographics.

10/29/2015

Evaluating the DC School Voucher Program

More high-quality evidence on the nation’s most prominent voucher program has the potential to inform education policymaking in the capital and across the country

10/22/2015

Who Opts Out of State Tests?

District-level data from New York suggest that relatively affluent districts tend to have higher opt-out rates, and that districts with lower test scores have higher opt-out rates after taking socioeconomic status into account

06/23/2015

Opt-Out Movement Likely Inconsequential for Teacher Evaluations

In the majority of classrooms, where opt-out appears likely to remain at low levels, the data strongly suggest that students sitting out of standardized testing will have only a trivial impact on the ratings received by their teachers.

04/15/2015

Why Annual Statewide Testing Is Critical to Judging School Quality

Accountability based on grade-span testing judges schools based on the students they serve, not how well they serve them.

02/03/2015

Testing Costs a Drop in the Bucket

The cost of standardized tests, long assailed by testing critics as too high, has resurfaced in the debate over reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act currently underway in Congress.

02/02/2015

School Vouchers Help Low-Income Minority Students Earn a College Degree

For the first time, we are able to show that vouchers may have a long-term positive impact on college graduation rates.

01/07/2015

Big Data Wins the War on Christmas

A social scientist analyzes whether Christmas affects test scores

12/23/2014

Mixed Results for Arizona’s Charter Schools

Charter schools vary more in their impact on student performance on state tests than traditional public schools; there are more charters with very large positive or very large negative test-score impacts than there are traditional public schools with such extreme outcomes.

11/17/2014

Ending Teacher Tenure Would Have Little Impact on its Own

Data from North Carolina suggest that principals are not using the four-year period before teachers qualify for tenure to identify and remove their lowest performers.

09/29/2014

Classroom Observations Offer Biggest Room for Improvement in Teacher Evaluations

Addressing the design flaws we have identified in teacher evaluation systems will bring districts closer to achieving the primary goal of meaningful teacher evaluation: assuring greater equity in students’ access to good teachers.

09/17/2014

Who Profits from the Master’s Degree Pay Bump for Teachers?

The fact that teachers with master’s degrees are no more effective in the classroom, on average, than their colleagues without advanced degrees is one of the most consistent findings in education research.

06/06/2014

Do Public Pensions Provide Equal Pay for Equal Work?

Women are more likely to spend time out of the workforce than men, and defined-benefit pension plans tend to punish teachers who fail to meet specific targets, such as 30 years of service.

03/13/2014

Ending Summer Vacation is Long Overdue—Here’s How to Pay for It

There’s clearly a slam-dunk case for eliminating—or at least dramatically shortening—summer vacation, which fits into a broader push to lengthen the school year beyond the 180 days that is typical in the U.S.

08/08/2013

The Need for Good Research on Pension Reform

Rhode Island is among the few states that have enacted sweeping pension reforms. Accurate information about the effects of those changes is vital both locally and to other states deciding which changes to make to their own retirement systems.

07/11/2013

Does Expanding School Choice Increase Segregation?

The findings reported here indicate that it is unlikely that charter schools—a prominent effort to increase school choice, especially for students from disadvantaged backgrounds—are making the problem worse.

05/16/2013

U.S. Institute of Education Sciences Weighs In on Voucher Impacts on College Enrollment

The What Works Clearinghouse declared the voucher study to be “a well-implemented randomized controlled trial.”

05/14/2013

Accepting Class Size Increases in Order to Sustain Wiser Investments

Are smaller classes worth the cost, relative to the alternative of a salary increase?

01/30/2013

Critique of Study of Voucher Impact on College Enrollment Misguided

Several of the issues raised by Goldrick-Rab have no merit and none undermine the primary conclusion of our study.

09/13/2012

Choosing Blindly

How can we tolerate ignorance on something that is as critical to student learning as instructional materials?

05/17/2012

Reviewing the Evidence on Class Size

There is little doubt that reducing class size can boost student achievement in some circumstances. What is much less certain is how much of a difference class-size policies can make, and whether the impacts are large enough to justify the costs of hiring additional teachers and building new classrooms.

06/22/2011
Sponsored Results
Sponsored by

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Sponsored by