Member Since 2009


Jay P. Greene is endowed chair and head of the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas. Greene conducts research and writes about education policy, including topics such as school choice, high school graduation rates, accountability, and special education. His research was cited four times in the Supreme Court's opinions in the landmark Zelman v. Simmons-Harris case on school vouchers. His articles have appeared in policy journals, such as The Public Interest, City Journal, and Education Next, in academic journals, such as Education Finance and Policy, Economics of Education Review, and the British Journal of Political Science, as well as in major newspapers, such as the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. Jay Greene is the author of Education Myths (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005).  Greene has been a professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Houston. He received his B.A. in history from Tufts University in 1988 and his Ph.D. from the Government Department at Harvard University in 1995. He lives with his wife and three children in Fayetteville, AR.  He blogs at www.jaypgreene.com .

Published Articles & Media

Book cover of "Higher Expectations" by Derek Bok.

The Purposes of Higher Education

In Bok’s view, shaping character is paramount

The Finlandization of New Orleans

Learning from the Big Easy’s success story is not so easy

What Do Education Reform Failures Have in Common?

Education is like parenting — the correct approaches are highly context-specific.
Link to Forbes

Boston Charter Study Tells Story About Limits of Test Scores

“It is all too common for researchers to misinterpret the policy implications of these experiments, even when they are properly conducted.”

New Studies Show Benefits of Arts-Focused Field Trips

Students taking part in multiple arts-focused field trips showed improved school engagement, higher test scores, and increased tolerance.

Education Reform’s Deep Blue Hue

Are school reformers right-wingers or centrists — or neither?

What I Teach In My Honors Seminar on B.S.

Too many social scientists, too few truths to discover

Texting Nudges Harm Degree Completion

Students randomly assigned to receive texts to remind them to complete the FAFSA while they are seniors in high school are significantly less likely to complete an AA or BA degree.

Narrow STEM Focus In Schools May Hurt Long-Term

New research by David Deming and Kadeem Noray finds that students who major in STEM fields initially experience elevated salaries and rates of employment, but the skills their occupations require change so rapidly that their training quickly becomes obsolete.

New Field Trip Study

The National Art Education Association and the Association of Art Museum Directors just released a new study examining the effects of student field trips to art museums.

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