Teachers and Teaching

At the KaiPod Learning pod in Newton, Massachusetts, students are taught one on one or in small groups by former school teachers. Students often work outdoors or while listening to music, and KaiPod provides enrichment activities tailored to students’ interests.

Some Pods Will Outlast the Pandemic

Students, parents say they appreciate the support
Begaeta Ahmic, a math teacher at Roosevelt High School, helps students with their work.

How D.C. Moved Teacher-Hiring Earlier and Used Data To Boost Quality and Diversity

“We do not want to be in a position where it’s August and we’re scrambling to fill positions”
Painting of Sarah Josepha Hale

How a Lady Editor Turned Teaching into a Majority-Female Profession

Not only did women make better teachers than men, but they cost less, argued Sarah Josepha Hale

The Politics of Closing Schools

Teachers unions and the Covid-19 pandemic in Europe
Split image of an orchid and a group of dandelions

The Orchid and the Dandelion

New research uncovers a link between a genetic variation and how students respond to teaching. The potential implications for schools—and society—are vast.
Nicole Reitz-Larsen uses movement to teach computer science at West High School in Salt Lake City. She used to teach German and business.

Computer Science for All?

As a new subject spreads, debates flare about precisely what is taught, to whom, and for what purpose
Third-grade teacher Cara Denison manages students in person and remotely, simultaneously, at Rogers International School in Stamford, Connecticut.

Move to Trash

Five pandemic-era education practices that deserve to be dumped in the dustbin
United States President Joe Biden signs executive order on Covid-19 during his first minutes in the Oval Office, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.

Condition Covid Aid on Opening Schools

Or else let funding flow directly to parents

Newsletter

Notify Me When Education Next Posts a Big Story