Governance and Leadership

A protester holds an “END QUALIFIED IMMUNITY” sign during a Black Lives Matter protest in Brooklyn, New York, on July 4, 2020.

Schooling Qualified Immunity

Should educators be shielded from civil liability for violating students’ rights?
Student holds a sign outside a news conference that reads "LAUSD: My children deserve a better education WE WANT EQUALITY"

As Unions and Public Officials Push to Keep Schools Closed, Parents Fight Back

Lawsuits on behalf of special needs students, private school parents have greatest chance of success
President Donald Trump watches as Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administers the Constitutional Oath to Amy Coney Barrett on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 26, 2020, after Barrett was confirmed by the Senate earlier in the evening.

A Fertile Period for Education Reform?

The unexpected effects of politics, the pandemic, and racial awakening
Lamar Alexander walks to the Senate floor on January 21, 2020.

Leadership Makes a Difference: Lamar Alexander and K–12 Education

As governor, secretary of education, and senator, Alexander had vast influence.

The Title IX Spotlight Shifts from the Campus to the Schoolhouse

New federal rules aim at preventing sexual harassment and assault in elementary and secondary education

A Short-Lived Constitutional Right to Education

Full Sixth Circuit will rehear case of Gary B v. Whitmer

Disrupted

Public-education reform in the nation's capital
Students from L.A. Unified's Encino Charter Elementary School —dressed in red to support their teachers—attended a community- organized “strike school” in an Encino, Calif., home. Parents took turns hosting children during the teacher strike.

Building on Shaky Ground

Reforming a divided school system in Los Angeles
Supreme Court

EdNext Podcast: Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments in Espinoza v. Montana

Joshua Dunn, a professor of political science at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, joins Education Next Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the Supreme Court case Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, which challenges Montana’s ban on tax-credit scholarships to religious schools.

The Education Exchange: School Choice and Blaine Amendments in Montana

Richard Komer, a former Senior Litigation Attorney at the Institute for Justice, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, a case which could declare the Blaine Amendments in 38 state constitutions unconstitutional.

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