Over the past two years, K–12 schools have implemented a range of steps aimed at slowing the spread of Covid-19, including plexiglass barriers.
Over the past two years, K–12 schools have implemented a range of steps aimed at slowing the spread of Covid-19, including plexiglass barriers.

Over the past two years, K–12 schools have implemented a range of steps aimed at slowing the spread of Covid-19, including mask requirements, testing for both asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals, quarantining and isolation, contact tracing, open windows, air purifiers, plexiglass barriers, schedule changes aimed at “cohorting” or reducing building occupancy, and closures. With vaccinations widely available and the Omicron variant mostly waning, should schools now go back to normal? Which, if any, of these pandemic-response measures should be dropped, and which, if any, should be kept? When, and under what conditions?

Our forum on the topic features three essays: one by Paymon Rouhanifard, CEO of Propel America and former school superintendent in Camden, New Jersey, and Dr. Shira Doron, hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center; another by Gerard Bossard, a public school educator, and Dr. Douglas Rothman, professor at Yale University School of Medicine; and a third by John Bailey, visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Photo of Paymon Rouhanifard and Dr. Shira Doron

 

Time for a New Normal

By Paymon Rouhanifard and Dr. Shira Doron

 

Photo of Gerard Bossard and Dr. Douglas Rothman

 

Tie Precautions to Community Risk Levels

By Gerard Bossard and Dr.Douglas Rothman

 

Photo of John Bailey

 

Reset Strategies Now, Prepare for the Future

By John Bailey

Last updated April 26, 2022