Member Since 2017

Judith Scott-Clayton


Judith Scott-Clayton is Associate Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she teaches courses on labor economics and causal inference. She is also a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Senior Research Associate at the Community College Research Center (CCRC). Scott-Clayton holds a B.A. from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard University.

Published Articles & Media

What Accounts for Gaps in Student Loan Default, and What Happens After

Differences in student and family background characteristics can account for about half of the black-white gap in default rates on student loans.

Evidence-Based Reforms in College Remediation Are Gaining Steam – and So Far Living Up to the Hype

A number of large-scale reforms have given students more options for completing remediation quickly, and more ways to avoid it altogether.

The Looming Student Loan Crisis Is Worse Than We Thought

New data allow for the most comprehensive assessment to date of student debt and default.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

Federal Work-Study: Past Its Prime, or Ripe for Renewal?

The Trump administration seeks to cut funding for the Federal Work-Study program by nearly 50 percent, from $990 million to $500 million, and to reform the program.

Lessons From the End of Free College in England

The English experience suggests that making college free is hardly the only way to increase quantity, quality, and equity in higher education.

As Cuomo Proposal Rekindles Free College Movement, New Research Provides Ammunition for Skeptics

Is free tuition the most effective use of additional funds for higher education?

Black-White Disparity in Student Loan Debt More Than Triples After Graduation

Racial gaps in total debt are far larger than even recent reports have recognized, far larger now than in the past, and correlated with troubling trends in the economy.

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