Member Since 2012

Jason Bedrick


Jason Bedrick is director of policy for EdChoice. Previously, he was a Policy Analyst at the Cato Institute's Center for Educational Freedom. He earned his Master’s in Public Policy, with a focus in education policy, from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His thesis, “Choosing to Learn,” assessed the scholarship tax credit programs operating in eight states including their impact of student performance, fiscal impact, program design, and popularity.

Published Articles & Media

Children wait for Florida Governor Ron DeSantis to arrive at a bill signing ceremony at St. John the Apostle School, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, in Hialeah, Fla.

How Big Was the Year of Educational Choice?

Estimating the number of newly eligible students

Survey Says: Parents Want School Choice

The nation’s largest private school choice program is effective, popular, and money-saving. And yet, it could be on the chopping block.

Can School Choice Keep Children Safe from Bullying?

Does a system that assigns students to schools based on where they live effectively trap some of them in dangerous situations?

Profiting from Educational Choice?

It’s students who benefit from tax-credit scholarships

The Data on Detroit

What the data say about district and charter school performance

Want Accountability in Education? Empower Parents

The real disagreement among reformers is not whether there should be accountability, but to whom schools should be held accountable: parents or bureaucrats.

Is Political Control Over Charter Schools Wise?

Education reformers should have serious reservations about democratically controlled charter authorizers.

The Educational Freedom Legacy of Andrew Coulson

Early yesterday morning, after a fifteen month battle with brain cancer, Cato Institute Senior Fellow in Education Policy Andrew Coulson passed away.

How to Fund Education Savings Accounts with Tax Credits

Last year, three states adopted new ESA policies A new funding model should be attractive to policymakers in states where constitutional provisions, such as Blaine amendments, may prohibit publicly funding private education.

On Regulating School Choice: A Response to Critics

Refusing to acknowledge that regulations can have real costs or that Louisiana’s voucher program has failed to deliver on its promises does nothing to serve the interests of disadvantaged children.

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