No Child Left Behind

Regardless of Who is to Blame, Accountability and Merit Pay are Taking Some Heat in Texas

I am encouraged when Sandy Kress tells me that the moves away from accountability and merit pay that have taken place recently in Texas were forced upon Governor Rick Perry and Robert Scott, the state’s education commissioner, by legislative pressures beyond their control.

No Child Left Behind: The Early Years

While everyone is wondering what will happen to NCLB, Nathan Glazer looks back at...

Duncan Can’t Make New Laws

The Secretary of Education’s authority to undo law and regulation in No Child Left Behind is not as broad as a recent story in the New York Times seems to imply.

Voice in the Wilderness: Save NCLB!

Despite the bashing the ten-year-old federal law has been taking--much of it deserved--on the ground, in the provinces NCLB has succeeded in beginning a much-needed change in the culture of public education: from a system focused on adults to one looking behind all the curtains to see how kids are doing. It hasn't been a pretty launch, of course, but the ship is only barely out of port.

What To Do About NCLB

Three separate lines of inquiry provide evidence that existing accountability systems have led to larger gains than expected in a world without them. At the same time, accountability is a relatively new invention, and it needs to be refined and improved.

The Ordeal of Equality

If Secretary Duncan is serious about "listening" to ideas for the next ESEA reauthorization (aka "fixing what's wrong with NCLB"), he would do well to start with this important and depressing book.

New Ed Next Podcast: What Congress Is Not Working On

Education Next’s Paul Peterson and Chester E. Finn, Jr. discuss the week’s education news...

Arne Duncan’s Planned Speech Shows Obama Administration Slowly Wading into NCLB

Secretary Duncan makes clear that he’s in no hurry to dive deep into NCLB. He’s inviting more input and advice as to how to set it right. (Never mind that there’s already a five-foot shelf of books and studies regarding NCLB’s shortcomings and needed repairs.)

When it Comes to Supporting NCLB, It’s the Way You Ask the Question That Counts

In polls, the way you ask the question can sometimes determine the answer you get. If the public has no strong opinion, they can be swayed by the question itself.

High Achieving Kids Need Options, Too

On Friday, Tom Loveless and I published an op-ed in the New York Times that argued that our nation’s highest-achieving students are only making minimal gains in the era of NCLB, while low-achieving students have made huge strides since 2000.

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