No Child Left Behind

Figure 1. The “below basic in fourth grade reading rate” versus the supplemental child poverty rate

Perhaps Progress Against Poverty Helped Test Scores Rise

The pattern isn’t perfect. But over the past twenty years, the two lines appear to be moving generally in the same direction.

EdStat: 23 States Said Their Education Agency “Had a Heavier Workload under ESSA than under NCLB”

New research challenges the notion that ESSA has fewer federal regulations than previous iterations of the federal K–12 law.

Let’s Leave the Worst Parts of NCLB Behind

Few of NCLB’s provisions received as much scorn as its singular focus on grade-level proficiency as the sole measure of school performance.

Proposed ESSA Regulations Limit States on Accountability

Like No Child Left Behind, the proposed ESSA regulations are going to stand in the way of some promising approaches to state accountability. What’s the point of that?

What Was Accomplished in the Era of Reform via Federal Regulation?

For all their differences, George W. Bush and Barack Obama shared a surprisingly common approach to school reform: a regulatory approach.

The Best Part of NCLB Reauthorization You’ve Never Heard Of

The larger legacy of the Every Child Achieves Act may well be how it cleans up supplement not supplant, a little discussed and often misunderstood fiscal rule

The New Education Trust Report: The Triumph of Hope Over Experience

When designing accountability systems, we need to find the sweet spot between defeatism and utopianism. In my view, that’s exactly what the states are trying to do. They deserve our praise, not our derision.

The Federal Government Is Not a State, and ESEA Does Not Give Arne Duncan Mandate Authority

Where is the “plain language” of ESEA that gives the Department of Education the authority to mandate statewide teacher-evaluation systems, particularly for states that want waivers on school accountability. Just as with ObamaCare and the question of whether the federal government is a “state,” the administration won’t have a good answer.

If You Like Your Federal Education Policy, You Can Keep It!

The administration wanted us to believe it had a smart, coherent vision and clear implementation plan for its federal education policy...until we realized it didn’t.

Alternative Charters and Alternative Accountability Systems

It makes sense for states to develop accountability systems that make space for alternative schools.

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