Federal Policy

Jill Biden is seen on C-Span during an appearance after the November 2022 midterm elections, speaking at the College Promise Careers Institute. “This is one area where we can make real, bipartisan progress,” Biden said.

Jill Biden Pushes “Promise Programs” as Post-Election Progress Area

Free community college idea could backfire by drawing some students away from four-year institutions
Incumbent Florida Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, his wife Casey and their children on stage after speaking to supporters at an election night party after winning his race for reelection in Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022.

What the 2022 Midterm Election Results Will Mean for Education Policy

The 2022 midterm elections were always going to offer voters a dubious choice. They could...
President George W. Bush signs the No Child Left Behind Act into law, with Representative George Miller and Senator Edward Kennedy behind him (from left)

20 Years Ago, NCLB Kinda, Sorta Worked. That’s the Problem

The legacy of a policy, good or bad, can long outlive the political moment that shapes it
Biden SEC chairman Gary Gensler

Biden Administration Sues a City Over “Rampant Overspending on Teacher Salaries”

Could the SEC, of all agencies, ride to the school-reform rescue?
People march against student debt around the U.S. Department of Education in Washington, D.C. on April 4, 2022. Members of the Debt Collective, which describes itself as a borrowers' union, called for President Joe Biden to abolish all student loan debt by executive order.

FAQ: Student Loan Cancellation Edition

Student debt isn’t a “poor people” issue.
President Joe Biden arrives with Education Secretary Miguel Cardona to visit with students at Luis Muñoz Marin Elementary School in Philadelphia, Friday, March 11, 2022.

Enough Already

Biden asks Congress for tens of billions more in education spending
Photo of Stephen Breyer

What Breyer’s Resignation Means for Education

The best case for Biden is that a successful confirmation builds momentum for a cut-down version of Build Back Better, including universal pre-K.
Julia Keleher, secretary of education of Puerto Rico, was sentenced to six months in federal prison after ushering in sweeping reforms, such as including breaking up the central education bureaucracy and introducing charter schools.

Punishment for Making Hard Choices in a Crisis: Federal Prison

Why every education leader should care about what happened to Julia Keleher

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