Accreditation’s Insidious Impact on Higher Education Innovation

While Washington, D.C. slams accreditors for not holding colleges and universities accountable for their student outcomes, the more insidious failure of accreditation is the stifling effect on innovation at existing institutions.

In the News: Teacher’s Aide or Surveillance Nightmare? Alexa Hits the Classroom

Teachers are starting to use voice-powered devices like Alexa in the classroom, though privacy advocates have raised some concerns. Michael Horn considers some of the larger ways that voice assistants might disrupt the classroom.

EdStat: In 2016, Raising Blended Learners Chose Five “Demonstration Sites” to Receive Grants of up to $500,000 Over Three Years

These sites had mixed to modest gains in student achievement, though educators report greater student ownership of learning and fewer disciplinary problems.

EdStat: The Next Generation Learning Challenges Have Allocated More than $25 Million across Seven Regional Funds

But has NGLC funding expanded the adoption of personalized learning in those regions?

Kickstarters for Personalized Learning

Local funds promote innovation—but for how long?

EdStat: According to the 2017 EdNext Poll, 69 Percent of Respondents Support the Idea of Schools Providing Students with Laptops for Classroom Use

Approval is higher among parents and still higher among teachers.

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year

Georgia Tech’s online program is the largest computer-science master’s degree program in the United States—and possibly the world.

In 2015, 14 Percent of U.S. College Students Were Enrolled in Online-Only Programs

Who takes online classes? Does online education simply substitute for in-person education or does it serve students who would not otherwise enroll in an educational program?

In the News: I’d Be an ‘A’ Student if I Could Just Read My Notes

When college professors ban laptops, students complain about hand cramps and an inability to read their own handwritten notes.

EdNext Podcast: Could Voice-Activated Technology Transform the Classroom?

As the use of smart speakers like Google Home and Amazon Echo becomes widespread in homes, some wonder whether voice-activated technology technology could prove useful in the classroom. Michael Horn joins Marty West to discuss how this might work and what the challenges might be.

Can Digital Also Mean Low-Tech? Yes, and It Can Enhance Teaching

Simple innovations, like digital lesson plans, can go a long way toward improving teacher effectiveness and student outcomes

Providing Computers Does Not Improve College Enrollment, Employment, or Earnings

A new study examines the effects of an experiment in which some community college students received free computers and others did not by lottery.

In the News: Inside the $28,000-a-year private school where children of tech workers learn to become the next Mark Zuckerberg or Elon Musk

BASIS runs a small handful of private schools in addition to its 25 public charter schools.

Hey Alexa, Can You Help Kids Learn More?

The next technology that could disrupt the classroom

Can Online Credit Recovery Recover?

We must try to set rigorous outcome-based standards for credit-recovery courses with rigorous assessments.

New Research Answers Whether Technology is Good or Bad for Learning

There’s been an infuriating log-jam between those who argue technology is a distraction at best and those who argue it is an extremely positive force.

Without the Right Curriculum, Personalized Learning Is Just Another Fad

Personalizing learning will be most powerful when it is coupled with intentional, coherent and rigorous instruction.

Online Schooling: Who Is Harmed and Who Is Helped?

A review of studies that measure the causal impact of online courses.

When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

Today’s frenzied enthusiasm for computer-assisted “personalized learning” could lead us to charge into some all-too-predictable pitfalls.

Should We Limit “Screen Time” in School?

Debating the wisest use of technology in the classroom

Putting Dialogue over Devices Shapes Mind and Character

As we sober up from the tech-infused party of the past 20 years, we should think about what should come first in our schools: shaping not just our students’ ability to persevere and solve difficult problems but also their character—their empathic connection with others, their capacity to see our shared humanity, and their ability to problem solve with others for a common good.

The Problem Is Wasted Time, not Screen Time

The emerging generation of educational technology has the power to accelerate learning productivity in ways we can scarcely imagine. If we can ensure that students are connected to it through the help of teachers, a natural balance between online and offline experiences will develop.

Big Data Transforms Education Research

Can machine learning unlock the keys to great teaching?

How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off by Ed-Tech Vendors

Ten tips for school districts from an industry insider

Should Teachers Be Allowed to Promote Commercial Products?

The New York Times ran an interminable front-page piece on Sunday raising doubts about the ethics and propriety of teachers who promote commercial products.

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