Member Since 2009


BRYAN C. HASSEL is Co-Director of Public Impact. He consults nationally with leading public agencies, nonprofit organizations and foundations working for dramatic improvements in K-12 education. He is a recognized expert on charter schools, school turnarounds, education entrepreneurship and human capital in education. Dr. Hassel’s recent work includes a chapter on how cutting-edge data strategies could transform public education in the book A Byte at the Apple: Rethinking Data Systems for the Post-NCLB Era and co-authoring “The Big U-Turn: How to bring schools from the brink of doom to stellar success” for Education Next.  Dr. Hassel has also served as a consultant to leading efforts to create high-quality charter school systems, including the Mayor of Indianapolis’s charter school office and, more recently, Rhode Island’s creation of a network of mayor-led charter schools.  He also authored the Brookings Institution Press book The Charter School Challenge: Avoiding the Pitfalls, Fulfilling the Promise, co-edited the Brookings volume Learning from School Choice, and co-authored Picky Parent Guide: Choose Your Child's School with Confidence.Dr. Hassel received his doctorate in public policy from Harvard University and his masters in politics from Oxford University, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He earned his B.A. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which he attended as a Morehead Scholar.

Published Articles & Media

High-Poverty Schools With No Trouble Attracting Great Teachers

Higher pay is one currency, but hope is just as powerful for attracting great educators to serve in the schools that need them most.

How a State Could Achieve Major Gains in Learning, Pay, Economy

Redesigning jobs to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students by having them work in collaborative teams will bring benefits to teachers, students, and the state as a whole.

Refreshing the Vision of an Opportunity Culture—for All

New school models that allow all teachers to succeed in teams increase the odds of widespread improvement in teaching and learning.

How One Leading Educators Fellow Extends Her Reach

How can schools redesign jobs and use technology to reach more students with excellent teachers? And how can they offer teachers more pay, within budget?

Teachers Say ‘Yes!’ to Opportunity Culture

A year ago, Public Impact began working with school design teams of pilot schools to choose and tailor school models for extending the reach of excellent teachers to more students.

Authorizers: See What Replacing Failing Charter Schools, Replicating Great Ones Can Do

How could cities see their charter school sectors take off in quality, matching or besting the performance of their district schools, and the state?

How to Pay Teachers Dramatically More, Within Budget

Schools could free funds to pay excellent teachers in teaching roles up to 40 percent more and teacher-leaders up to about 130 percent more, within current budgets and without increasing class sizes.

Current Strategies Won’t Solve Our Teacher Quality Challenges

In our new report, Opportunity at the Top: How America’s Best Teachers Could Close the Gaps, Raise the Bar, and Keep Our Nation Great, Emily Ayscue Hassel and I asked a simple question: "Will our nation’s bold efforts to recruit more top teachers and remove the least effective teachers put a great teacher in every classroom?” We ran the numbers and discovered a disappointing answer: No. Even if these reforms were wildly successful, most classrooms still would not have great teachers.

The Big U-Turn

How to bring schools from the brink of doom to stellar success

Fixing School Funding

School finance reform continues to light up debates whenever it arises. The Holy Grail here is a system that gets incentives right, allocating funding in ways that encourage schools and districts to do what’s best for kids, AND addresses the immense equity challenge posed by the various yawning achievement gaps.

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