Courts and Law

The Education Exchange: Why Did the Supreme Court Change Course on Agency Fees?

On the last day of its 2017-2018 term, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Janus vs. AFSCME that public employee unions can no longer collect agency fees from non-members. Clint Bolick, an associate justice of the Arizona Supreme Court, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss why the U.S. Supreme Court felt it was necessary to overrule a decision from the 1970s allowing agency fees.

EdStat: 54% of Public School Teachers are Opposed to Agency Fees

Only 25% of the public favor collecting union dues from non-members.

EdStat: Following the Janus Supreme Court Decision, Unions in 22 States Can No Longer Collect Agency Fees

Six states had already passed right-to-work legislation removing unions’ rights to assess agency fees.

Q&A: Rebecca Friedrichs

Reflections on the Janus v. AFSCME ruling, from the plaintiff in a similar case

EdStat: In the Five Years After Right-to-Work Reform, Union-Dues Revenue per Teacher Decreased by $316 in Wisconsin

These figures suggest that, in right-to-work states, teachers unions lost power not only in numbers, but also in terms of dollar resources.

EdStat: Six States have Passed Right-to-Work Legislation in the Past Eight Years

An upcoming Supreme Court decision might end the controversial practice of allowing public-sector unions to collect agency fees.

After Janus

A new era of teachers union activism

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