The Blog

Behind the Headlines: In Search of Education Leaders

On Top of the News In Search of Education Leaders 12/05/09 | The New York...

Behind the Headlines: Obama pushes to turn around failing schools

On Top of the News Obama pushes to turn around failing schools 12/03/09 | boston.com Behind...

New Ed Next Podcast: Biggest Spender in Politics: The NEA

Education Next’s Paul Peterson and Chester E. Finn, Jr. talk this week about what...

Is the Decline of the Mainstream Press Bad for Education?

Education is the top in only 1.4 percent of news coverage by television, radio, newspapers and news web sites, a report issued by the Brookings Institution tells us. Should we be distressed? Perhaps, but we shouldn’t be surprised.

Race to the Top Versus the Money Chase

The National Education Association (and its local affiliates) gave $56.3 million dollars to state and federal election campaigns in 2007 and 2008, more than any other entity. The much smaller American Federation of Teachers tossed in another $12 million dollars into political campaigns. This enormous cash nexus that swamps anything any business entity has contributed creates a huge problem for Arne Duncan.

Behind the Headlines: Legislature Passes Measures on Budget and Pensions, but Critics See Only Half Steps

On Top of the News Legislature Passes Measures on Budget and Pensions, but Critics See...

Behind the Headlines: Montgomery reports AP test surge

On Top of the News Montgomery reports AP test surge 12/02/09 | The Washington Post Behind...

Behind the Headlines: Katherine Kersten: At U, future teachers may be reeducated

On Top of the News Katherine Kersten: At U, future teachers may be reeducated 11/22/09 ...

A “Race to the Top” Flip-Flop

The Wall Street Journal editorial page has already taken the Administration to task for backing away from some of its tougher “Race to the Top” provisions, but check out this morsel, thanks to Education Daily...

No Reader Left Behind: Improving Media Coverage of Education

A Brookings panel discussion Wednesday afternoon should be interesting.

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