The Blog

The Decline of the Stately School

On the road in America, it has become hard to distinguish a public school from a post-industrial factory.

Polls Seem to Differ on Charters, But In Fact They Agree

According to the Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll, 64 percent of all Americans “favor the idea of charters.” But according to the Ednext poll, only 39 percent “support the formation of charter schools.”

A Little Context Needed for Complaints about School Revenue Shortfalls

The general public is woefully uninformed as to how much is spent on K-12 public education and, by extension, how much that spending has grown. Why would this be the case? No mystery, really.

Russ Whitehurst Reviews Crossing the Finish Line

Russ Whitehurst, former director of the Institute for Education Sciences at ED, has reviewed...

Why Don’t More College Students Cross the Finish Line?

A book released today takes a close look at why only 60 percent of students entering four-year colleges are graduating. One finding: scores on the SAT and ACT tests are not good predictors of whether students are likely to graduate from college.

The Real Reason Why English Educators Don’t Like Classic Reading Lists

The idea of selecting certain works for study, creating a canon of novels and poems and plays, fashioning a lineage, however multi-racial and filled with women writers it is, strikes all-too-many curriculum designers as a bad, bad idea.

SAT Scores: A Distraction from the Urgent Need for Massive Reform

The College Board has recently released its 2009 SAT results. These results increasingly are a distraction, a national narcotic that dulls the collective senses into believing that there are reform programs deserving of being evaluated.

Mostly Harmless

Beneath the over-reactions and counter-over-reactions on Obama’s speech today is a real issue — Who should have primary responsibility for raising (educating) children?

Bringing High-Quality Charter Schools to Scale

There are more than 4500 charter schools across the United States today, but in...

The College Cruise

The New York Times this week hosted a forum on summer homework, and while I voted "Yea!" many contributors and commenters thought summer homework a terrible intrusion on June, July, and August.

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