Curriculum

Book Alert: Intelligence and How to Get It

There is no end to the debate over intelligence. The latest book-length entry into this debate is University of Michigan psychology professor Richard Nisbett’s "Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count."

Happy T-1 Peoples Day

Controversies surrounding the celebration of Columbus Day raise a number of interesting questions. Unfortunately, many of the new answers offered are at least as simplistic and historically false as the established answers they are meant to replace.

Does Teaching More Science Content Produce Better Scientists?

A new study does not demonstrate what the authors believe it demonstrates: that teaching more science content leads only to more content knowledge, not to higher-level science competence.

If Students Are Career-Oriented, It Doesn’t Show Up in Majors

With all the talk about workplace-readiness in education reform, one would think that students who enter college would look carefully at the coursework that leads to high-paying jobs.

Bahrain, Exeter Offer Clues About the Gender Gap in Math

Why do boys outperform girls in math, especially at the highest levels of math achievement? Two sets of economists released papers this summer examining the size of the gender gap in math achievement and investigating some possible contributing factors.

More and More, School Just Isn’t ‘Meaningful’

Most educators probably aren't surprised that more than two-thirds of high school seniors don't recognize the value of what they have to learn.

The College Cruise

The New York Times this week hosted a forum on summer homework, and while I voted "Yea!" many contributors and commenters thought summer homework a terrible intrusion on June, July, and August.

No More Revenge of the Nerds

According to the Wall Street Journal, Texas high school students can now receive additional course credit toward graduation for participation in athletics.

New Book by E.D. Hirsch Challenges Reformers of All Stripes

This provocative new book by E.D. Hirsch (dedicated to the late Al Shanker) poses fundamental challenges to both of the dominant reform movements in American education--challenges that their leaders would do well to ponder.

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