Courts and Law

Supreme Court Denies Review but Offers Roadmap for High School Coach Who Prayed

Four justices hint they might be willing to overturn a Scalia opinion some saw as curtailing the free exercise of religion.

Can Schools Commit Malpractice? It Depends

Recently seven students attending public schools in Detroit sued the state of Michigan, arguing that their schools should have grounded literacy instruction in evidence-based practices.

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

In the News: ‘Access to Literacy’ Is Not a Constitutional Right, Judge in Detroit Rules

On Friday, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by Detroit students who argued that they had been denied access to literacy because of the condition of their schools.

EdStat: 54% of Public School Teachers are Opposed to Agency Fees

Only 25% of the public favor collecting union dues from non-members.

EdStat: Following the Janus Supreme Court Decision, Unions in 22 States Can No Longer Collect Agency Fees

Six states had already passed right-to-work legislation removing unions’ rights to assess agency fees.

Both Teachers and the Public Back Janus Decision by Supreme Court

When it comes to agency fees, the nays have it by a clear majority. No less than 56% of the general public and 54% of public school teachers are opposed.

EdStat: In the Five Years After Right-to-Work Reform, Union-Dues Revenue per Teacher Decreased by $316 in Wisconsin

These figures suggest that, in right-to-work states, teachers unions lost power not only in numbers, but also in terms of dollar resources.

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