The Education Exchange: What Goes Into Choosing the Right College?

Michael Horn, co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new book “Choosing College,” co-written with Bob Moesta, and the different questions prospective college applicants should ask themselves as they work through the application process for college.

In the News: The College of New Rochelle Is For Sale — and Comes With a Castle

The 15.6-acre campus of the College of New Rochelle in New York will be auctioned off on November 21, the New York Post reports. The school filed for bankruptcy protection last month.

Support Builds For Making the SAT Untimed For Everyone

A possible solution to the “Gaming the System” problem

Privilege Worth Perpetuating

A review of “The Years That Matter Most” by Paul Tough

Bipartisan Bill Would Set Rules for Income Share Agreements

Better incentives for colleges, less loan risk for students.

What Colleges Can Learn From Toyota

An excerpt from Education Next executive editor Michael Horn’s new book

Has President Trump Scared Away All the Foreign Students?

The facts behind fears of a higher-education revenue recession

Two Answers to Political Correctness

Review of “The Assault on American Excellence” by Anthony Kronman and “Safe Enough Spaces” by Michael Roth

Does the Baumol Effect Explain Rising College Costs?

Salary data and the academic research undercut the notion that faculty pay is the key driver in price increases.

The Education Exchange: How Rising Costs Have Affected Higher Education

Richard Vedder, an Independent Institute Sr. Fellow and Distinguished Professor of Economics Emeritus at Ohio University, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new book, “Restoring the Promise: Higher Education in America,” and how rising college tuition costs have changed the dialogue around higher education.

The Disruptive Playbook for Bootcamps to Upend Higher Education

An unbundled higher education system could focus on helping learners earn and learn, as opposed to the existing pattern of learn and then later, maybe, earn.

Can We Design Student Loan Forgiveness to Target Low-Income Families?

How different approaches to loan forgiveness, including plans put forward by members of Congress and presidential hopefuls, would distribute benefits to Americans of different income levels and races and ethnicities.

Who Would Benefit from Elizabeth Warren’s Student Loan Forgiveness Proposal?

The plan is likely to disproportionately benefit middle- and upper-middle-income Americans, as well as black families, at an estimated total cost of about $955 billion.

The Corruption Continuum

Name an educated, upper-middle-class parent who hasn’t done a hundred things to advantage their own progeny in the frantic competition for limited spots at elite universities.

Democrats Just Voted AGAINST Free College

On Feb. 27, Democrats in New Hampshire defeated House Bill 673, which would have allocated $100,000 to cover the cost of students taking exams for free college credit.

What Do Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps Mean for Student Loan Policy?

Higher education policy research tends to focus more on income than wealth, not because income is more important, but because it is easier to measure, but income is a poor proxy for wealth, especially for black and Hispanic families.

In the News: Cal State Remedial Education Reforms Help Thousands More Students Pass College-Level Math Classes

After the Cal State system eliminated non-credit, remedial math classes and replaced them with credit-bearing, college-level courses, nearly 7800 students passed the higher-level math classes.

Protecting College Students from Uncomfortable Ideas

A review of “The Coddling of the American Mind” by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt

EdNext Podcast: Identifying the Colleges That Successfully Recruit Low-Income Students

Colleges are trying harder to recruit high-achieving students from low-income families. And some organizations are now ranking colleges on the extent to which they provide opportunities to those students. But new research identifies problems with the way these rankings are calculated, and suggests that colleges should be looking at the numbers differently. Caroline Hoxby joins Marty West to discuss her latest research on this topic.

What We’re Watching: Sen. Lamar Alexander on Reforming the Higher Education Act

On Monday, February 4, the American Enterprise Institute hosted Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) for a speech on the committee’s agenda for reforming the Higher Education Act.

In the News: Another Small College Will Close

Many higher-education experts are concerned about the future of small private colleges in America, which face dwindling enrollment and mounting deficits.

The Right Way to Capture College “Opportunity”

Popular Measures Can Paint the Wrong Picture of Low-Income Student Enrollment

In the News: Colleges have been under pressure to admit needier kids. It’s backfiring

A new study finds that when we rank colleges based on how many Pell grant recipients they enroll, we may not accurately identify the schools that are doing the best job of recruiting low-income students.

Texting Nudges Harm Degree Completion

Students randomly assigned to receive texts to remind them to complete the FAFSA while they are seniors in high school are significantly less likely to complete an AA or BA degree.

Academic Innovation: The Obligation to Evolve

The university has survived because it is dynamic, not static. Its ability to absorb innovations from the outside has been a crucial factor in its success.

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