More Evidence That Benefits of Government-Funded Pre-K Are Overblown

Supporters of increased investments in state pre-K need to confront the evidence that it does not enhance student achievement meaningfully, if at all. It may, of course, have positive impacts on other outcomes.

FAFSA Completion Rates Matter: But Mind the Data

When it comes to analyzing completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), it is important to address several measurement challenges.

The Challenges of Curriculum Materials as a Reform Lever

There is increasing momentum behind the idea that curriculum materials, including textbooks, represent a powerful lever for education reform. This report identifies some specific challenges faced by this approach.

What Accounts for Gaps in Student Loan Default, and What Happens After

Differences in student and family background characteristics can account for about half of the black-white gap in default rates on student loans.

What Works vs. What We Can Evaluate

Pushing schools to use evidence poses a real risk that school leaders will feel pressure to choose approaches that have been easier to evaluate, rather than those that are the most central to improving educational practice.

New Evidence on the Benefits of Small Group Math Instruction for Young Children

Small group instruction is ubiquitous in elementary schools when it comes to reading, but not for math. This study provides some preliminary evidence that small group instruction may be a promising approach for math instruction as well.

Yes, There Really Is a Tax Break for Upper-Income Graduate Students and Congress Won’t Let it Expire

These resources would be better spent on aid that encourages students to enroll in and complete an undergraduate degree.

What Can NAEP Tell Us About How Much U.S. Children Are Learning?

This report presents new analyses of state-average NAEP data that attempt to address the limitation of changing samples of students by following cohorts of students from 4th grade in a given year to 8th grade four years later.

Did Tenure Reform in Florida Affect Student Test Scores?

There is some evidence that Florida’s “game changing” tenure reform law of 2011 slightly increased student test achievement in math and reading, and that the gains were more prominent for the lowest-performing students.

The Financial Stress of Teaching in Regions of Fast Economic Growth

Rising costs are creating substantial economic anxiety among teachers and possibly affecting their teaching practice.

Is the High School Graduation Rate Really Going Up?

We would like graduates to meet standards for graduation and not simply leave the system with a piece of paper and deficient skills.

The Tax Benefits for Education Don’t Increase Education

Taxpayers have filed for over thirty billion dollars in credits and deductions for college expenses they paid in 2017.

What is the Market Price of Daycare and Preschool?

Knowing what families of different income and educational levels are currently paying for daycare can inform policy debates over how much taxpayers should spend to help families afford it.

Who Is in Special Education and Who Has Access to Related Services?

New Evidence From the National Survey of Children’s Health

Evidence-Based Reforms in College Remediation Are Gaining Steam – and So Far Living Up to the Hype

A number of large-scale reforms have given students more options for completing remediation quickly, and more ways to avoid it altogether.

How Life Outside of School Affects Student Performance in School

Approximately 18 percent of Michigan third graders have been formally investigated by Child Protective Services for possible exposure to abuse or neglect.

Simplifying Grants for College Students: Who Wins and Who Loses?

Making federal student aid programs simpler and easier for students to navigate is a key goal of efforts to reauthorize the Higher Education Act .

Influx of Haitian Refugees in Florida Didn’t Hurt Student Outcomes

We present the first evidence on the effects of a large influx of refugees or disaster-fleeing migrants on the educational outcomes of incumbent students.

By and   and  03/05/2018 Blog, Editorial  

Evidence Should Inform But Not Drive Decision Making

Decision makers may end up relying on data about outcomes that happen to be available rather than about outcomes that align with their goals.

Why Is Accountability Always About Teachers?

Teachers do not manage or direct the system. Senior leaders make decisions that affect every aspect of life for teachers in schools.

By   02/21/2018 Blog, Editorial  

ACT/SAT for All: A Cheap, Effective Way to Narrow Income Gaps in College

A universal test opens the door to more effective, targeted efforts to draw talented, disadvantaged students into college.

Building Knowledge to Improve Degree Completion in Community Colleges

Policymakers should take steps to encourage colleges to adopt successful models such as ASAP and the Detroit Promise Path.

When Public Opinion on Policy Is Driven by Misconceptions, Refute Them

Respondents’ conceptions and support toward Common Core were substantially affected a short, easy-to-read text.

Disproportionality in Student Discipline: Connecting Policy to Research

Researchers should consider the importance of implementation research as an integral part of discipline reform program evaluation.

By   01/22/2018 Blog, Editorial  
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