The Education Exchange: Rebecca Friedrichs’ Fight Against Teachers Unions

Rebecca Friedrichs, the lead plaintiff in the Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association case that ended in a four-four split in the Supreme Court, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss her book, “Standing Up to Goliath,” and how teachers feel about national unions.

The Education Exchange: Are the Benefits of a College Education Dwindling?

Robert G. Valletta, Group Vice President at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss whether the earning power of college graduates have flatlined in relation to those without a college degree.

The Education Exchange: Higher Education in the EdNext Poll

Marty West, the editor-in-chief of Education Next, joins Paul E. Peterson to continue their discussion on the 2019 Education Next Poll, focusing on the public’s opinion on higher education.

The Education Exchange: How to Reduce Chronic Absenteeism

Todd Rogers, Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new study that looks to curb chronic absenteeism through randomized experiments.

The Education Exchange: How Pell Grants Expanded to the Middle Class

Jason Delisle, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss how the federal Pell Grant program, initially designed to help low-income students access college, has become available to more and more middle-class families.

The Education Exchange: Winston Churchill’s Lasting Legacy

Andrew Roberts, a Visiting Professor at the War Studies Department at King’s College, London and the Lehrman Institute Lecturer at the New-York Historical Society, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new book, “Churchill: Walking with Destiny,” Winston Churchill’s lasting impact on Western civilization, and how he is taught today in schools.

The Education Exchange: How Does Race Affect Special Education Identification in Schools?

Scott Imberman, a Professor in the Department of Economics at Michigan State University, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new paper which uses data from Florida to explore how the identification of childhood disabilities varies by race and school racial composition.

The Education Exchange: How Rising Costs Have Affected Higher Education

Richard Vedder, an Independent Institute Sr. Fellow and Distinguished Professor of Economics Emeritus at Ohio University, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new book, “Restoring the Promise: Higher Education in America,” and how rising college tuition costs have changed the dialogue around higher education.

The Education Exchange: The State of Parent Choice in 2019

Howard Fuller, a Distinguished Professor of Education, and Founder/Director of the Institute for the Transformation of Learning at Marquette University, joins Paul E. Peterson on the 100th episode of the Education Exchange to discuss the state of school choice and it’s contentious standing in current politics.

The Education Exchange: A New Look at American History

Wilfred McClay joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new book, Land of Hope: An Invitation to the Great American Society, which he describes as a narrative account of the American story that could be used as a high school history textbook.

The Education Exchange: Reforming Education in America’s Prisons

There is new interest in giving adult prisoners greater access to education while they are behind bars. One bill in Congress would allow prisoners access to Pell Grants to pay for higher education, something which has not been possible since 1994. Gerard Robinson, Executive Director of the Center for Advancing Opportunity, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss the importance of education for men and women in prison and some different kinds of programs that could be offered.

The Education Exchange: Social Trust Lower in Neighborhoods Without Amenities

Americans may like to buy things online, but people who live in neighborhoods with stores, libraries, restaurants, schools, and parks nearby have higher levels of community satisfaction and lower levels of social isolation. That’s the finding of a new survey on community and society conducted by the American Enterprise Institute. Daniel Cox of AEI joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss the survey.

The Education Exchange: Students in Large Urban Districts Making Gains

Students attending school in big cities made significant gains on NAEP in the years between 2003 and 2013 but those trend lines have flattened in recent years. Paul Peterson talks with Kristin Blagg, a research associate in the Center on Education Data and Policy at the Urban Institute, about what the data show, and about which districts made the greatest gains.

The Education Exchange: What Explains Gains in Miami-Dade County Schools?

In the most recent ratings put out by the state of Florida, Miami-Dade County Public Schools earned an “A” designation and had no “F” rated schools, unusual achievements for a large urban district. Ron Matus of Step Up For Students sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss some factors behind the school district’s success.

The Education Exchange: School Choice is Plentiful in Milwaukee but Students Still Struggle

Families in Milwaukee gained access to the nation’s first private school vouchers nearly three decades ago. Today the educational landscape in Milwaukee also includes charter schools and many other forms of public school choice. But standardized test scores are still low and the achievement gap between black and white students remains large. Alan Borsuk of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Marquette University talks with Paul E. Peterson about some of the challenges Milwaukee has faced despite the long history of school choice in the city.

The Education Exchange: Working Together for Charter Schools in Indianapolis

Robin J. Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss what Indianapolis has done to make charter schools work.

The Education Exchange: The U.S. Department of Education Touts Tax Credits, Title IX Reform

Jim Blew, assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development at the U.S. Department of Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss some of the work of the department, including a new federal tax credit initiative and proposed changes to Title IX.

The Education Exchange: A Different Desegregation Story in Boston

For over 50 years, a limited number of students of color living in Boston have been able to enroll in schools in the suburbs as part of the METCO program, run by the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity. Charles Glenn sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss who benefits from the program and whether it distracts from larger issues related to urban schools.

The Education Exchange: Private School Participation in School Choice Programs Affected by Regulation

A new study finds that students who receive vouchers to attend private schools in Louisiana are outperformed by students in a control group. Some argue that regulations in Louisiana that discourage many private school leaders from participating in school choice programs are to blame for the poor results. Paul Peterson talks with Patrick Wolf about two recent studies shedding light on these issues.

The Education Exchange: Congress: The Weakest Branch?

Jeff Bergner, author of The Vanishing Congress, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss how Congress has stopped doing its job and how that could change.

The Education Exchange: Finding the Right Role for Social and Emotional Learning

What is social and emotional learning, how does it relate to academic learning, and how much should schools focus on it? Chester E. Finn, Jr. joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “What Social and Emotional Learning Needs to Succeed and Survive,” a new article co-written with Rick Hess.

The Education Exchange: Do Students Learn More with Better Math Textbooks?

Some studies have found that schools can get substantial gains in achievement by changing textbooks. But a new analysis by the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard finds little evidence of differences in achievement gains for schools using different math textbooks. Paul E. Peterson talks with Thomas Kane, of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, about the new study, “Learning by the Book: Comparing math achievement growth by textbook in six common core states.”

The Education Exchange: Fixing the Culture of Contempt

In a new book, “Love Your Enemies,” Arthur Brooks describes the rise of a culture of contempt—a habit of seeing people who disagree with us not as merely incorrect or misguided, but as worthless–and considers what we can do to bridge divides and mend relationships. He talks with Paul E. Peterson about how contempt corrodes our own happiness, about remembering the difference between people we disagree with and the ideas they embrace, and about the role universities can play in repairing our culture.

The Education Exchange: How Declining Birth Rates Could Affect Schools

A decline in birth rates in the U.S. could mean that the school-aged population will spiral downward in the next decade and beyond. Would this be a disaster for schools? Or could there be a silver lining? Mike Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “The Baby Bust Goes to School.”

The Education Exchange: How Much Should We Spend to Tackle Climate Change?

What tradeoffs are involved when we choose to spend huge sums of money to slow global warming? Are there more cost-effective ways to do more good in the world, through spending on education, for instance? Bjorn Lomborg talks with Paul E. Peterson about his research on the impact on global temperatures of goals set in the Paris climate accord and how the funds being used to meet those goals could be better spent.

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