The Education Exchange: Working Together for Charter Schools in Indianapolis

Robin J. Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss what Indianapolis has done to make charter schools work.

The Education Exchange: The U.S. Department of Education Touts Tax Credits, Title IX Reform

Jim Blew, assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development at the U.S. Department of Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss some of the work of the department, including a new federal tax credit initiative and proposed changes to Title IX.

The Education Exchange: A Different Desegregation Story in Boston

For over 50 years, a limited number of students of color living in Boston have been able to enroll in schools in the suburbs as part of the METCO program, run by the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity. Charles Glenn sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss who benefits from the program and whether it distracts from larger issues related to urban schools.

The Education Exchange: Private School Participation in School Choice Programs Affected by Regulation

A new study finds that students who receive vouchers to attend private schools in Louisiana are outperformed by students in a control group. Some argue that regulations in Louisiana that discourage many private school leaders from participating in school choice programs are to blame for the poor results. Paul Peterson talks with Patrick Wolf about two recent studies shedding light on these issues.

The Education Exchange: Congress: The Weakest Branch?

Jeff Bergner, author of The Vanishing Congress, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss how Congress has stopped doing its job and how that could change.

The Education Exchange: Finding the Right Role for Social and Emotional Learning

What is social and emotional learning, how does it relate to academic learning, and how much should schools focus on it? Chester E. Finn, Jr. joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “What Social and Emotional Learning Needs to Succeed and Survive,” a new article co-written with Rick Hess.

The Education Exchange: Do Students Learn More with Better Math Textbooks?

Some studies have found that schools can get substantial gains in achievement by changing textbooks. But a new analysis by the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard finds little evidence of differences in achievement gains for schools using different math textbooks. Paul E. Peterson talks with Thomas Kane, of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, about the new study, “Learning by the Book: Comparing math achievement growth by textbook in six common core states.”

The Education Exchange: Fixing the Culture of Contempt

In a new book, “Love Your Enemies,” Arthur Brooks describes the rise of a culture of contempt—a habit of seeing people who disagree with us not as merely incorrect or misguided, but as worthless–and considers what we can do to bridge divides and mend relationships. He talks with Paul E. Peterson about how contempt corrodes our own happiness, about remembering the difference between people we disagree with and the ideas they embrace, and about the role universities can play in repairing our culture.

The Education Exchange: How Declining Birth Rates Could Affect Schools

A decline in birth rates in the U.S. could mean that the school-aged population will spiral downward in the next decade and beyond. Would this be a disaster for schools? Or could there be a silver lining? Mike Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “The Baby Bust Goes to School.”

The Education Exchange: How Much Should We Spend to Tackle Climate Change?

What tradeoffs are involved when we choose to spend huge sums of money to slow global warming? Are there more cost-effective ways to do more good in the world, through spending on education, for instance? Bjorn Lomborg talks with Paul E. Peterson about his research on the impact on global temperatures of goals set in the Paris climate accord and how the funds being used to meet those goals could be better spent.

The Education Exchange: Looking Beyond Academic Impacts of School Voucher Programs

This week, Paul Peterson speaks with Corey DeAngelis, an education policy analyst at the Cato Institute, and co-author, with Patrick J. Wolf, of the new study, which is described in “Private School Choice Helps Students Avoid Prison and Unplanned Pregnancies.”

The Education Exchange: Subject Tests for Prospective Elementary Teachers Have High Failure Rates

Kate Walsh, president of the National Council on Teacher Quality, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new report by the NCTQ, “A Fair Chance: Simple steps to strengthen and diversify the teacher workforce.”

The Education Exchange: Public Sector Unions Not Devastated by Janus

When the Supreme Court ruled last year in Janus v. Afscme that unions could no longer collect agency fees from employees who choose not to join, many predicted a major decline in union membership. But according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, public union membership declined less than 1% in 2018. In this episode, Paul E. Peterson talks with Daniel DiSalvo.

The Education Exchange: Florida Tax Credit Scholarships Boost College Enrollment

The Florida Tax Credit (FTC) scholarship program is the nation’s largest private school choice program. A new study finds that students who enroll in private schools through the FTC program are more likely to go to and graduate from college than their public school peers.

The Education Exchange: Charter School Effectiveness Growing in Texas

Most studies of charter schooling look at how charter schools compare with traditional schools at one point in time, but the success of the reform depends on whether the charter sector improves over time. So explain Eric Hanushek and his colleagues, the authors of a new study looking at changes over time in the charter school sector in Texas.

The Education Exchange: Public Opinion on Education is Less Polarized Than on Other Issues

Polling data reveal that when it comes to most debates in education policy, the divide between Republicans and Democrats is not growing. Only on issues like teacher tenure and merit pay is public opinion becoming more polarized. David Houston, a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his latest paper, “Polarization and the Politics of Education: What Moves Partisan Opinion?”

The Education Exchange: Remembering Nathan Glazer

Nathan Glazer, urban sociologist and scholar of ethnicity, race and education, died recently at the age of 95. On this episode, Peter Skerry, Professor of Political Science at Boston College, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss Glazer’s work and the ideas he wrestled with.

The Education Exchange: Surge in Non-Teaching Staff Strains School Budgets

As teachers strike or threaten to strike in several cities, one of the key issues is pay. But while teachers want higher salaries, school districts face a number of financial challenges. One source of strain in school district budgets is what economist Ben Scafidi calls the staffing surge, a major increase in non-teaching staff hired over the past few decades.

The Education Exchange: How Teach for America Shapes State Education Policy

Many Teach for America corps members remain in the classroom long-term, but a large number move on to careers involving advocacy. A new study looks at how Teacher for America impacts state-level education policy.

The Education Exchange: Who Benefits from Redshirting?

Many parents choose to wait an extra year before enrolling a child in elementary school, a practice known as redshirting. Does this practice benefit the children who are held back? This week, Paul E. Peterson talks with Phillip Cook of Duke University, the co-author of a new study on the impact of delayed entry on student achievement.

Exchange Replay: High School Grade Inflation on the Rise

A study based on data from North Carolina found that grade inflation increased over the last decade and that grade inflation was more severe in schools attended by affluent students than in those attended by lower-income pupils. Seth Gershenson joined Paul E. Peterson last summer to discuss the study.

Exchange Replay: A Survey of Teachers by Teachers

How do teachers feel about the changes taking place in American education? In this replay episode, Evan Stone, the co-founder and CEO of Educators for Excellence, joined Paul E. Peterson to discuss his organization’s survey, “Voices from the Classroom: A Survey of America’s Educators.”

The Education Exchange: Parents Satisfied with Florida Tax-Credit Scholarship Program

The Florida Legislature created the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program in 2001. Last year, scholarships from the program were awarded to a total of 108,098 students to attend private schools in the state. Jason Bedrick, director of policy for EdChoice, joins Paul E. Peterson to explain how the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program works and to discuss the results of a new survey of participating families.

The Education Exchange: Test Scores and Long-Term Outcomes: Why the Disconnect?

Researchers and policymakers are often puzzled when a policy like high quality preschool or class size reduction is found to have no impact on student test scores but a positive impact on longer-term outcomes like college graduation or future earnings. A new paper by Eric Nielsen can help explain these different findings. It turns out that the way we calculate test scores may be disguising the true impact of these policies.

The Education Exchange: Inside the U.S. Senate with Erica Suares, Advisor to Sen. Mitch McConnell

Erica Suares, Senior Policy Advisor to the Senate Majority Leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to talk politics and policy.

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