EdNext Podcast: Strong Evidence that School Start Times Matter

A new study finds that later school start times increase achievement on standardized tests. Marty West talks with Jennifer Heissel about the study, which she co-authored with Samuel Norris.

The Education Exchange: Working Together for Charter Schools in Indianapolis

Robin J. Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss what Indianapolis has done to make charter schools work.

The Education Exchange: The U.S. Department of Education Touts Tax Credits, Title IX Reform

Jim Blew, assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development at the U.S. Department of Education, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss some of the work of the department, including a new federal tax credit initiative and proposed changes to Title IX.

What We’re Watching: Is Career and Technical Education Having an Identity Crisis?

On May 14, 2019, Fordham hosted a discussion on the purpose of career and technical education. Career and technical education is enjoying its moment in the sun, but does it actually deserve the acclaim?

EdNext Podcast: Wraparound Services and Student Achievement

Many school districts try to address external obstacles to student learning by offering “wraparound services” in schools. These schools try to connect their students with outside groups that can help them deal with challenges from food insecurity to mental health issues.

In a new article, Michael McShane notes that “While integrated supports may help meet students’ physical and emotional needs, their ability to improve student learning remains unproven.”

McShane sits down with Marty West to discuss his article, “Supporting Students Outside the Classroom.”

What We’re Watching: Sixty-Five Years after Brown v. Board, Where Does School Integration Stand?

On Thursday, May 2, the Urban Institute hosted a discussion on segregation in U.S. schools since Brown v. Board of Education. Rucker Johnson made a presentation based on his new book, Children of the Dream: Why School Integration Works.

The Education Exchange: A Different Desegregation Story in Boston

For over 50 years, a limited number of students of color living in Boston have been able to enroll in schools in the suburbs as part of the METCO program, run by the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity. Charles Glenn sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss who benefits from the program and whether it distracts from larger issues related to urban schools.

EdNext Podcast: Should You Hold Your Child Back from Kindergarten?

Each year, millions of parents nationwide must make a seemingly life-altering decision for their soon-to-be kindergartener: to redshirt or not to redshirt. But is redshirting preschoolers really advantageous, or could it do more harm than good?

The Education Exchange: Private School Participation in School Choice Programs Affected by Regulation

A new study finds that students who receive vouchers to attend private schools in Louisiana are outperformed by students in a control group. Some argue that regulations in Louisiana that discourage many private school leaders from participating in school choice programs are to blame for the poor results. Paul Peterson talks with Patrick Wolf about two recent studies shedding light on these issues.

What We’re Watching: Fostering Student Effort and Virtue

On Wednesday, May 1, 2019, Fordham and Hoover hosted Rod Paige, who argued that school reforms need to focus on boosting student effort, and Pete Wehner, who made a case for reviving old-fashioned character education.

EdNext Podcast: Democracy Prep Schools Boost Civic Participation

Can K-12 schools today make a difference when it comes to their students’ civic attitudes and behavior? A new study finds that attending a public charter school operated by Democracy Prep Public Schools nearly doubles students’ rates of civic participation as young adults. Marty West speaks with Seth Andrew, founder of Democracy Prep Public Schools.

The Education Exchange: Congress: The Weakest Branch?

Jeff Bergner, author of The Vanishing Congress, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss how Congress has stopped doing its job and how that could change.

EdNext Podcast: What Studies Really Show about Social and Emotional Learning

Is social and emotional learning the missing piece in education reform, or is it just another fad that will distract education reformers from ensuring that students are prepared academically for what lies ahead? Grover “Russ” Whitehurst, argues that those looking for a body of evidence to support the recommendations of social and emotional learning advocates will be sorely disappointed.

The Education Exchange: Finding the Right Role for Social and Emotional Learning

What is social and emotional learning, how does it relate to academic learning, and how much should schools focus on it? Chester E. Finn, Jr. joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “What Social and Emotional Learning Needs to Succeed and Survive,” a new article co-written with Rick Hess.

What We’re Watching: The Triumphs and Struggles of Rural Education in America

The Aspen Institute hosted a book talk and panel discussion on a new book, No Longer Forgotten: The Triumphs and Struggles of Rural Education in America, co-edited by Andy Smarick and Michael McShane. EdNext has just published an article by Smarick and McShane based on the book.

EdNext Podcast: Supporting Social and Emotional Development to Boost Academic Success

Some believe that growing interest in social and emotional learning is just a distraction from the academic mission of schools, but Robert Balfanz argues that only by educating the whole child can schools prepare students for adult success. Marty West talks with Balfanz about why he thinks social and emotional learning is a natural outgrowth of the standards and accountability movement and about the research behind his views.

What We’re Watching: Have We Closed Socioeconomic Achievement Gaps?

Has the achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students widened, narrowed, or persisted? Evidence from a new study using 50 years of student achievement was analyzed at an event on April 9, 2019.

What We’re Watching: Closing the Dignity Gap and Reviving Civics

On Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 4 pm, Hoover and Fordham will host two speakers on education policy and building a better society.

The Education Exchange: Do Students Learn More with Better Math Textbooks?

Some studies have found that schools can get substantial gains in achievement by changing textbooks. But a new analysis by the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard finds little evidence of differences in achievement gains for schools using different math textbooks. Paul E. Peterson talks with Thomas Kane, of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, about the new study, “Learning by the Book: Comparing math achievement growth by textbook in six common core states.”

EdNext Podcast: 2020 Presidential Candidates Press For Higher Teacher Pay

Last week, Kamala Harris made headlines with an ambitious—and expensive—plan to raise teacher pay, and she’s not the only Democratic presidential candidate talking about education. Marty West discusses what the candidates have been saying with Ira Stoll, EdNext’s managing editor, who has been reporting from the campaign trail in New Hampshire and who wrote “Teacher Pay Emerges as Democratic Primary Issue.”

The Education Exchange: Fixing the Culture of Contempt

In a new book, “Love Your Enemies,” Arthur Brooks describes the rise of a culture of contempt—a habit of seeing people who disagree with us not as merely incorrect or misguided, but as worthless–and considers what we can do to bridge divides and mend relationships. He talks with Paul E. Peterson about how contempt corrodes our own happiness, about remembering the difference between people we disagree with and the ideas they embrace, and about the role universities can play in repairing our culture.

EdNext Podcast: Reading in the Age of Screens

The rise of digital media has made it harder than ever to engage in deep, contemplative reading. As Maryanne Wolf writes in her new book, Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World, skimming is the new normal. Marty West speaks with Doug Lemov, who reviewed Wolf’s book for Education Next.

The Education Exchange: How Declining Birth Rates Could Affect Schools

A decline in birth rates in the U.S. could mean that the school-aged population will spiral downward in the next decade and beyond. Would this be a disaster for schools? Or could there be a silver lining? Mike Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his new article, “The Baby Bust Goes to School.”

EdNext Podcast: The Persistence of Achievement Gaps between Haves and Have-Nots

The conventional wisdom is that, as income inequality has grown in the United States, inequality in education has increased as well. A new study finds that gaps in student achievement along lines of socioeconomic status have not grown over the past half-century. But neither have they narrowed; rather, they’ve been strikingly persistent.

What We’re Watching: Education 20/20 — William Damon & Robert P. George

On March 26, 2019 at 4 pm, Fordham and Hoover will host two speakers on schools, patriotism, and illiberalism.

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