EdStat: Of the 30 Percent of Undergraduate Students Who Did Not Apply for Federal Student Aid in 2011-12, Roughly a Third were Likely Eligible for Pell Grants

For the purpose of awarding need-based aid, what matters most is increasing financial aid applications among those most likely to be eligible for financial aid.

EdStat: School Districts with Higher Child Poverty Levels Have Lower FAFSA Completion Rates—About 3 Percentage Points for Every 10-Percentage-Point Difference in the Child Poverty Rate

Students in relatively affluent districts are more likely to have access to the one-on-one assistance that helps students submit the FAFSA, enroll in college, and receive more financial aid.

EdStat: 124 Four-Year Private Nonprofit Colleges have Closed in the Past 25 Years, According to Data from the National Center for Education Statistics

Many higher-education experts are concerned that more closures may be looming.

FAFSA Completion Rates Matter: But Mind the Data

When it comes to analyzing completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), it is important to address several measurement challenges.

Private Colleges in Peril

Financial pressures and declining enrollment may lead to more closures

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

Stealing a Page From Disruption to Transform Accreditation

There is a fundamental mismatch between what accreditors value and what external actors want.

Straight Up Conversation: New Harvard Ed School Dean Bridget Terry Long

Bridget Terry Long, recently named dean of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, on the strengths and opportunities of HGSE and what she hopes to accomplish in the role.

What Accounts for Gaps in Student Loan Default, and What Happens After

Differences in student and family background characteristics can account for about half of the black-white gap in default rates on student loans.

EdStat: Seven Regional Accreditors were Responsible for Accrediting More Than 80% of the Public and Private Nonprofit Colleges in the United States as of 2012–2013

Higher-education institutions have to stay accredited for their students to be able to use federal subsidies to pay for college.

EdStat: Between 2010 and 2016, NACIQI Identified Compliance Issues with 80% of the Accreditors Requesting a Status Renewal

Critics have observed that NACIQI and the U.S. Department of Education rarely hold accreditors accountable for their outcomes.

EdStat: Colleges Have Estimated that an Accreditation Review Costs Over $1 Million

A higher-education institution has to participate in an accreditation review every five to ten years to stay accredited.

EdStat: As of 2012-2013, Seven Regional Accreditors Collectively Oversaw the Colleges that Enrolled Over 90% of All U.S. College Students

Over the course of 200 years, accreditors transformed from voluntary college associations into the gatekeepers for billions of dollars of public aid.

College Accreditation, Explained

An EdNext guide to how it works, who’s responsible for it, and more

How Governors Can Give All Students ‘Freshman Year for Free’

As the rising costs of tuition and fees outpace increases in financial aid and student debt skyrockets, there has never been a more critical time to bring innovation to our higher education system.

EdStat: Total State and Local Spending on Higher Education Increased by 13.5 Percent (in Inflation-Adjusted Terms) from 1987 to 2015 Nationwide

The student population increased far more rapidly than state spending during the same period of time.

EdStat: State and Local Funding for Higher Education has Declined to $7,152 per Student Enrolled in a Public Two- or Four-Year School

Even though states are spending more overall on higher education, these increases have not kept pace with enrollment growth.

EdStat: 53 Percent of the Higher-Education Spending Decline is Explained by Public-Welfare Spending

Doug Webber looks at state spending decisions to determine the relationship between higher-education funding declines and increases in other categories.

EdStat: Taxpayers Have Filed for Over Thirty Billion Dollars in Credits and Deductions for College Expenses They Paid in 2017

What impact do these tax benefits have on education?

Higher Ed, Lower Spending

As States Cut Back, Where Has the Money Gone?

The Tax Benefits for Education Don’t Increase Education

Taxpayers have filed for over thirty billion dollars in credits and deductions for college expenses they paid in 2017.

EdStat: Over 1,000,000 Students Drop Out of College Each Year

Students who drop out rack up debt without getting the benefits that come with having earned a degree.

The Forgotten Students

Over one million students drop out of college each year, and colleges do little to bring them back.

Evidence-Based Reforms in College Remediation Are Gaining Steam – and So Far Living Up to the Hype

A number of large-scale reforms have given students more options for completing remediation quickly, and more ways to avoid it altogether.

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year

Georgia Tech’s online program is the largest computer-science master’s degree program in the United States—and possibly the world.

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