EdStat: At Best, Increasing Pre-K Enrollment by 10 Percent Would Raise a State’s Standard Adjusted NAEP Score by a Little Less Than 1 Point Five Years Later

According to new analyses, the positive associations between NAEP scores and earlier pre-K enrollment are small and typically not statistically significant.

Pre-K Helps Test Scores in Short Run But Hurts Them Later

The hard reality is that the process of human development is complex and highly varied, so we just don’t know the optimal arrangements for all children.

EdStat: From 2002 to 2017, the Percentage of Four-Year-Olds Enrolled in State Pre-K Rose from 14 Percent to 33 Percent

But is government-funded pre-K the surest way to provide the opportunity for all children to succeed in school and life?

More Evidence That Benefits of Government-Funded Pre-K Are Overblown

Supporters of increased investments in state pre-K need to confront the evidence that it does not enhance student achievement meaningfully, if at all. It may, of course, have positive impacts on other outcomes.

EdStat: Parents Pay a Median Price of $8,320 a Year for Eight Hours a Week of Center-Based Care for a Child Under Five Who Does Not Have a Disability

Parents spend more in the Northeast and West and less in the South and Midwest.

EdStat: The U.S. Federal Government Spends Roughly $26 Billion Annually on Programs and Tax Expenditures to Support the Care and Education of Young Children

But how much are individual households spending to send a child to a center-based program when no one is helping them pay?

What is the Market Price of Daycare and Preschool?

Knowing what families of different income and educational levels are currently paying for daycare can inform policy debates over how much taxpayers should spend to help families afford it.

EdStat: 48 Percent of Parents Support Testing Preschool Students

Even though controversy has sprung up around the new International Early Learning and Child Well-Being Study, our 2017 EdNext poll found that 48 percent of parents support requiring students in publicly funded preschool programs to take state tests.

Adding Pre-K to Renaissance Charter School

What New York City’s Pre-K For All initiative has meant for a charter school.

Rigorous Preschool Research Illuminates Policy (and Why the Heckman Equation May Not Compute)

Let’s avoid big and irrevocable bets on conclusions and recommendations that are far out in front of what a careful reading of the underlying evidence can support.

Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

Redshirting may do more harm than good

Why the Federal Government Should Subsidize Childcare and How to Pay for It

There is broad public support for more government spending on childcare as long as that spending does not result in another unfunded entitlement that worsens the deficit

The Charter Model Goes to Preschool

Despite obstacles, innovative new programs expand access

In New York City, Mayor Bill De Blasio’s Initiatives Threaten to Widen the Achievement Gap

Mayor de Blasio has shown a good instinct for identifying the right targets—early childhood education and reading. But it’s hard to be encouraged that either he or his chancellor knows how to hit them.

Pre-K and Charter Schools: Where State Policies Create Barriers to Collaboration

Why is it so difficult for America’s high-impact, “no-excuses” charter schools to participate in pre-K programs?

Is a Massive New Set of Federal Regulations the Best Way to Reform Head Start?

Head Start is an example of sound impulses gone missing into the jungles of governmental extravagance and bureaucracy.

Is It Quality Or Quantity That Counts?

Ah, January is upon us: The wind is howling, the thermometer is plummeting, and we are greeted by the nineteenth consecutive edition of Quality Counts, Education Week’s compilation of mostly useful data, analysis, rankings and commentaries.

Pre-Kraziness

What is the benefit conferred by preschool if there’s no school after the pre?

The NCES, NIEER, and Spinning Preschool Data

The job of a statistical agency is to provide people with data by which they can judge these things for themselves. On the preschool front, the National Center for Education Statistics has let the country down.

Now You’re Entitled To Your Own Facts Too

In the preschool realm, the U.S. Department of Education has it outsourced the number-gathering to a prominent interest group in the field and it has allowed that interest group to add its own spin.

Can Pre-K Blaze the Way to Disruption?

Because half of 3 and 4 year olds are not enrolled in pre-K today, we have an opportunity to foster disruptive innovations that could change the way we think about childcare, parenting, and education.

Does Pre-K Work? It Depends How Picky You Are

How is it that different individuals could look at the same research and come to such different conclusions?

The Pre-K Problem: A Great Investment or Passing the Buck?

What should we be talking about when we talk about universal pre-K?

The Trouble With Economists

It turns out that preschool programs are hard to replicate with fidelity or in such a way that each additional preschool student gets the anticipated benefit.

What We’re Watching: Assessing the President’s Preschool Plan

Sara Mead and Russ Whitehurst assess President Obama’s preschool plan at a panel at the Fordham Institute.

By Education Next    Early Childhood and Preschool, Multimedia, Video  
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