The Secret Source of Lost Learning and Educator Burnout

Teachers spend more than a third of their instructional time on tasks other than instruction. And that’s before we add in paperwork done outside the classroom.

The Disruptive Playbook for Bootcamps to Upend Higher Education

An unbundled higher education system could focus on helping learners earn and learn, as opposed to the existing pattern of learn and then later, maybe, earn.

Can We Design Student Loan Forgiveness to Target Low-Income Families?

How different approaches to loan forgiveness, including plans put forward by members of Congress and presidential hopefuls, would distribute benefits to Americans of different income levels and races and ethnicities.

Social-Emotional Learning: What It Is, What It Isn’t, And What We Know

Effective programming focuses on concrete, teachable skills

You Might Be Surprised Which States Prioritize Higher Teacher Salaries

The U.S. is spending dramatically more per pupil than in decades past, yet teacher salaries have barely kept pace with inflation.

Who Would Benefit from Elizabeth Warren’s Student Loan Forgiveness Proposal?

The plan is likely to disproportionately benefit middle- and upper-middle-income Americans, as well as black families, at an estimated total cost of about $955 billion.

AFT Misses a Chance to Demand that Teachers Get Support They Need

Teachers are angry about inadequate training and poor curricula.

Is Wi-Fi a Health Threat in Schools?

Sorting fact from fiction

The Corruption Continuum

Name an educated, upper-middle-class parent who hasn’t done a hundred things to advantage their own progeny in the frantic competition for limited spots at elite universities.

Straight Up Conversation: My Tech High CEO Matt Bowman

My Tech High partners with innovative public school districts to offer tuition-free, home-centered education programs to 5,000 students, primarily in Utah.

Straight Up Conversation: Teaching Matters CEO Lynette Guastaferro

Lynette Guastaferro is the CEO of Teaching Matters, which currently serves 237 urban schools. Their programs include Early Reading Matters, which coaches teachers on how to better teach reading skills.

Great Curriculum Is Important. But It’s Not Enough.

As long as teacher preparation programs, professional development organizations, school systems themselves, and state education agencies do little to help teachers master specific reading, math, and science curricula, we’re likely to see more studies showing minimal effects of curricula.

Democrats Just Voted AGAINST Free College

On Feb. 27, Democrats in New Hampshire defeated House Bill 673, which would have allocated $100,000 to cover the cost of students taking exams for free college credit.

What Do Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps Mean for Student Loan Policy?

Higher education policy research tends to focus more on income than wealth, not because income is more important, but because it is easier to measure, but income is a poor proxy for wealth, especially for black and Hispanic families.

In the News: Cal State Remedial Education Reforms Help Thousands More Students Pass College-Level Math Classes

After the Cal State system eliminated non-credit, remedial math classes and replaced them with credit-bearing, college-level courses, nearly 7800 students passed the higher-level math classes.

Do Smarter Teachers Make Smarter Students?

International evidence on teacher cognitive skills and student performance

Protecting College Students from Uncomfortable Ideas

A review of “The Coddling of the American Mind” by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt

Pension Fix Depends On Accurate Counting

How should we measure teacher longevity?

New ‘Knowledge Mapping’ Tool Evaluates English Language Arts Curricula

Tool allows education leaders to see the degree to which their curriculum builds critical background knowledge and aligns with their vision and priorities.

We Can’t Just Invest in Building Great Curricula

We need to invest in marketing them, too.

EdNext Podcast: Identifying the Colleges That Successfully Recruit Low-Income Students

Colleges are trying harder to recruit high-achieving students from low-income families. And some organizations are now ranking colleges on the extent to which they provide opportunities to those students. But new research identifies problems with the way these rankings are calculated, and suggests that colleges should be looking at the numbers differently. Caroline Hoxby joins Marty West to discuss her latest research on this topic.

Straight Up Conversation: AltSchool Chief Impact Officer Devin Vodicka

AltSchool partners with 25 districts and schools to implement technology-enabled personalized learning. It also operates four tuition-funded lab schools in San Francisco and New York City.

K-12 Schools Aren’t Getting Disrupted, but Markets that Provide Resources to Schools Are

Edtech entrepreneurs and school choice advocates sometimes invoke disruptive innovation as an indomitable force that will redeem and transform broken school systems.

What We’re Watching: Sen. Lamar Alexander on Reforming the Higher Education Act

On Monday, February 4, the American Enterprise Institute hosted Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) for a speech on the committee’s agenda for reforming the Higher Education Act.

In the News: Another Small College Will Close

Many higher-education experts are concerned about the future of small private colleges in America, which face dwindling enrollment and mounting deficits.

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