EdStat: State Spending on Preschool More Than Doubled between 2002 and 2016, from $3.3 to $7.4 Billion

However, a range of research also shows that many early childhood programs do not have positive long-term effects.

In the News: New England’s Smallest Colleges Are Struggling

A review of financial conditions at New England’s small private colleges finds that tuition revenue is failing to keep up with expenses at more than half the schools.

Accountability for Early Education — A Different Approach and Some Positive Signs

Outcomes-based accountability has come to preschools in the form of Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS).

Becoming an Instructional Coach

An interview with two teachers-turned-coaches about how they made the transition.

EdStat: A New Version of the HEA Would Cut the “90/10” Rule, which Requires Colleges to Raise a Minimum of 10 Percent of their Revenues from Sources Other than Federal Financial Aid

As part of our Fall 2018 forum, Kevin Carey discusses rethinking the rules on higher-ed spending.

Rethinking the Rules on Federal Higher-Ed Spending

How can Congress spur innovation while clamping down on fraud?

Change the Rules to Unleash Innovation

Although federal spending on higher education has expanded access, it has also had an unintended effect.

Strong Hand of Regulation Protects Students

Lawmakers charged with writing a new Higher Education Act (HEA) face a dilemma.

EdStat: Every Year, the Federal Government Spends More than $100 Billion on Higher Education, Mainly in the Form of Grants and Subsidized Loans to Students

As part of our Fall 2018 forum, Michael B. Horn and Alana Dunagan discuss rethinking the rules on higher-ed spending.

EdStat: All Else Being Equal, Teachers with Classes in which 20 Percent of Students had an Emotional/ Behavioral Disorder were 2.15 Percentage Points More Likely to Leave Their School or Teaching

Teachers are likely a key element in the successful inclusion of students with disabilities (SWDs), but few studies have investigated how general-education teachers are impacted.

EdStat: Twenty-Seven Percent of Public K‒12 Schools had a Reading Coach on Staff by the 2015‒16 School Year, According to the National Teacher and Principal Survey

Does one-to-one coaching actually help teachers get better?

Taking Teacher Coaching To Scale

Can Personalized Training Become Standard Practice?

EdStat: 10 States Will Have at Least 20 Percent Fewer High-School Graduates in the Pipeline by 2030

Raw population numbers are what matter most in predicting future demand for postsecondary education.

EdStat: The Private Nonprofit Sector Enrolls About 30 Percent of All Students Attending Four-Year Colleges

How will the fiscal crisis impact this sector? And what kind of higher-education system do we want?

Has Inclusion Gone Too Far?

Weighing its effects on students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers

EdStat: At Best, Increasing Pre-K Enrollment by 10 Percent Would Raise a State’s Standard Adjusted NAEP Score by a Little Less Than 1 Point Five Years Later

According to new analyses, the positive associations between NAEP scores and earlier pre-K enrollment are small and typically not statistically significant.

Accreditation’s Insidious Impact on Higher Education Innovation

While Washington, D.C. slams accreditors for not holding colleges and universities accountable for their student outcomes, the more insidious failure of accreditation is the stifling effect on innovation at existing institutions.

Pre-K Helps Test Scores in Short Run But Hurts Them Later

The hard reality is that the process of human development is complex and highly varied, so we just don’t know the optimal arrangements for all children.

Are Teacher Preparation Programs Interchangeable Widgets? An Interview With Paul T. von Hippel

States have imposed a variety of rules on teacher candidates and the programs that seek to license them, with the goal of ensuring that all new teachers are ready to succeed on their first day in the classroom. New research challenges the very assumptions underlying these efforts.

EdStat: From 2002 to 2017, the Percentage of Four-Year-Olds Enrolled in State Pre-K Rose from 14 Percent to 33 Percent

But is government-funded pre-K the surest way to provide the opportunity for all children to succeed in school and life?

EdStat: Of the 30 Percent of Undergraduate Students Who Did Not Apply for Federal Student Aid in 2011-12, Roughly a Third were Likely Eligible for Pell Grants

For the purpose of awarding need-based aid, what matters most is increasing financial aid applications among those most likely to be eligible for financial aid.

More Evidence That Benefits of Government-Funded Pre-K Are Overblown

Supporters of increased investments in state pre-K need to confront the evidence that it does not enhance student achievement meaningfully, if at all. It may, of course, have positive impacts on other outcomes.

EdStat: School Districts with Higher Child Poverty Levels Have Lower FAFSA Completion Rates—About 3 Percentage Points for Every 10-Percentage-Point Difference in the Child Poverty Rate

Students in relatively affluent districts are more likely to have access to the one-on-one assistance that helps students submit the FAFSA, enroll in college, and receive more financial aid.

EdStat: 124 Four-Year Private Nonprofit Colleges have Closed in the Past 25 Years, According to Data from the National Center for Education Statistics

Many higher-education experts are concerned that more closures may be looming.

EdStat: Around the World, There are Approximately 264 Million Children Not in School

Another 330 million are in school but not learning.

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