The Education Exchange: Public Sector Unions Not Devastated by Janus

When the Supreme Court ruled last year in Janus v. Afscme that unions could no longer collect agency fees from employees who choose not to join, many predicted a major decline in union membership. But according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, public union membership declined less than 1% in 2018. In this episode, Paul E. Peterson talks with Daniel DiSalvo.

Teacher Salaries, Benefits, and Incentives All Leading to Strike Talk in Denver

Debate is focused on a pay-for-performance program but benefit costs loom in the background.

Los Angeles Teachers Strike a Deal, But Miss an Opportunity

Every California teacher could see an immediate pay boost of $10,250 per year, if not for the state’s massive pension debt. Yet the Los Angeles teacher strike deal kicks the can on that crucial issue.

In the News: LA Teachers Strike Drags Into Third Day With No End In Sight

As the teachers strike in Los Angeles drags on, there has been no shortage of media coverage. How fair has it been?

In the News: Context on LAUSD’s Potential Teacher Strike

As teachers in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) prepare to go out on strike this Thursday, Chad Aldelman calls attention to the district’s big increase in spending on employee benefits. He notes that one reason benefit costs are so high in LAUSD is that the district has offered generous health care benefits to retired teachers.

Why Los Angeles Teachers May Strike

From 2001 to 2016, the Los Angeles Unified School District increased overall spending by 55.5 percent, but employee benefit costs soared 138 percent.

Q&A: Eleanor Goetzinger

A veteran teacher reflects on the Oklahoma strike

After the Teacher Walkouts

Will unions shift their focus to the statehouse?

Adaptation Could Bring New Strength

Forum: After the Teacher Walkouts

Statewide Strikes Are a Shot Across the Bow

Forum: After the Teacher Walkouts

Sketching a Workable Way Forward on Teacher Pay

There’s a win-win solution to teacher compensation. But it requires a willingness to rethink how teachers are paid and how school dollars are spent.

EdNext Podcast: What It Was Like to Go On Strike

In Oklahoma, teachers walked out for nine days this April to demand better pay and more spending on schools. Eleanor Goetzinger, a special ed teacher and behavior specialist in the Oklahoma City Public Schools, talks with Marty West about what the strike meant for her, for her students, and for schools in Oklahoma.

Health Care for Life

Will teachers’ post-retirement benefits break the bank?

How Did Major Newspapers Cover the 2018 Teacher Strikes?

Tens of thousands of teachers in six states walked out of their schools, attracting media attention across the country.

Straight Up Conversation: Nat Malkus on What’s Next for Teachers’ Unions After Janus

Nat Malkus is a resident scholar in education policy at AEI.

The Education Exchange: Why Did the Supreme Court Change Course on Agency Fees?

On the last day of its 2017-2018 term, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Janus vs. AFSCME that public employee unions can no longer collect agency fees from non-members. Clint Bolick, an associate justice of the Arizona Supreme Court, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss why the U.S. Supreme Court felt it was necessary to overrule a decision from the 1970s allowing agency fees.

EdStat: 54% of Public School Teachers are Opposed to Agency Fees

Only 25% of the public favor collecting union dues from non-members.

In the News: Is This Supreme Court Decision The End Of Teachers Unions?

NPR’s Anya Kamenetz and Cory Turner consider what the Janus ruling will mean for teachers uions in an article that draws on research by Bradley D. Marianno and Katharine O. Strunk that was published recently in Education Next.

Both Teachers and the Public Back Janus Decision by Supreme Court

When it comes to agency fees, the nays have it by a clear majority. No less than 56% of the general public and 54% of public school teachers are opposed.

EdStat: Following the Janus Supreme Court Decision, Unions in 22 States Can No Longer Collect Agency Fees

Six states had already passed right-to-work legislation removing unions’ rights to assess agency fees.

Q&A: Rebecca Friedrichs

Reflections on the Janus v. AFSCME ruling, from the plaintiff in a similar case

EdStat: In the Five Years After Right-to-Work Reform, Union-Dues Revenue per Teacher Decreased by $316 in Wisconsin

These figures suggest that, in right-to-work states, teachers unions lost power not only in numbers, but also in terms of dollar resources.

EdStat: In the Five Years Following Right-to-Work Reform in Wisconsin, the National Education Association (NEA) Affiliate Lost Approximately 52 Percent of its Members

During the same period of time, trends in agency-shop states remained stable.

EdStat: The National Education Association is Currently Estimating Membership Losses at 300,000 Nationwide

Membership losses will result in a steep decline in revenue.

EdStat: Six States have Passed Right-to-Work Legislation in the Past Eight Years

An upcoming Supreme Court decision might end the controversial practice of allowing public-sector unions to collect agency fees.

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