Judging Choice

Court victory for charter schools in Louisiana

EdStat: A Recent Scan Covering the Past 40 Years Found 80 Cases Alleging Education Malpractice

Only one of those cases was successful.

Can Schools Commit Malpractice? It Depends

Recently seven students attending public schools in Detroit sued the state of Michigan, arguing that their schools should have grounded literacy instruction in evidence-based practices.

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

In the News: ‘Access to Literacy’ Is Not a Constitutional Right, Judge in Detroit Rules

On Friday, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by Detroit students who argued that they had been denied access to literacy because of the condition of their schools.

The Education Exchange: Why Did the Supreme Court Change Course on Agency Fees?

On the last day of its 2017-2018 term, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Janus vs. AFSCME that public employee unions can no longer collect agency fees from non-members. Clint Bolick, an associate justice of the Arizona Supreme Court, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss why the U.S. Supreme Court felt it was necessary to overrule a decision from the 1970s allowing agency fees.

EdStat: 54% of Public School Teachers are Opposed to Agency Fees

Only 25% of the public favor collecting union dues from non-members.

Both Teachers and the Public Back Janus Decision by Supreme Court

When it comes to agency fees, the nays have it by a clear majority. No less than 56% of the general public and 54% of public school teachers are opposed.

EdStat: Following the Janus Supreme Court Decision, Unions in 22 States Can No Longer Collect Agency Fees

Six states had already passed right-to-work legislation removing unions’ rights to assess agency fees.

Q&A: Rebecca Friedrichs

Reflections on the Janus v. AFSCME ruling, from the plaintiff in a similar case

EdStat: In the Five Years After Right-to-Work Reform, Union-Dues Revenue per Teacher Decreased by $316 in Wisconsin

These figures suggest that, in right-to-work states, teachers unions lost power not only in numbers, but also in terms of dollar resources.

EdStat: In the Five Years Following Right-to-Work Reform in Wisconsin, the National Education Association (NEA) Affiliate Lost Approximately 52 Percent of its Members

During the same period of time, trends in agency-shop states remained stable.

EdStat: The National Education Association is Currently Estimating Membership Losses at 300,000 Nationwide

Membership losses will result in a steep decline in revenue.

EdStat: Six States have Passed Right-to-Work Legislation in the Past Eight Years

An upcoming Supreme Court decision might end the controversial practice of allowing public-sector unions to collect agency fees.

After Janus

A new era of teachers union activism

Judgment Day for Union Agency Fees

High court hears oral argument in Janus v. AFSCME

Snap Judgment

Should schools act as community hall monitors?

Lynchpin of Teachers Union Power Returns to the Supreme Court

If the Court rules against agency fees it would cause teachers unions’ membership to shrink and the unions’ political and economic wings to be clipped.

In the News: Supreme Court Poised to Deal a Sharp Blow to Unions for Teachers and Public Employees

The Supreme Court announced Thursday that it will hear a case involving the agency fees that teachers and other public employees are required to pay to unions even if they choose not to join the unions.

Narrow Opening for School Choice

But Blaine Amendments stand, for now

The Battle over Blaine Amendments Heads Back to the States

On the heels of its decision yesterday in Trinity Lutheran v. Comer, the Supreme Court today granted cert to and vacated state supreme court decisions out of Colorado and New Mexico that used Blaine Amendments to exclude religious schools from government aid programs.

Broad Majority, Narrow Ruling for School Choice in Trinity Lutheran Case

The Supreme Court closed out its Spring 2017 term this morning by announcing its opinion in a case with potential implications for private school choice.

In the News: What Monday’s SCOTUS Ruling in Trinity Lutheran Preschool Case Could Mean for School Vouchers

The Supreme Court will hand down its final rulings of the term today, including the Trinity Lutheran case.

Is the Trump Education Department Really “Rolling Back” Civil Rights?

Looking behind the hype on sexual assault enforcement

Is the Constitution Colorblind?

Debating Antonin Scalia’s record on race and education

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