Judging Choice

Court victory for charter schools in Louisiana

Rethinking the Rules on Federal Higher-Ed Spending

How can Congress spur innovation while clamping down on fraud?

Change the Rules to Unleash Innovation

Although federal spending on higher education has expanded access, it has also had an unintended effect.

Strong Hand of Regulation Protects Students

Lawmakers charged with writing a new Higher Education Act (HEA) face a dilemma.

EdStat: A Recent Scan Covering the Past 40 Years Found 80 Cases Alleging Education Malpractice

Only one of those cases was successful.

Can Schools Commit Malpractice? It Depends

Recently seven students attending public schools in Detroit sued the state of Michigan, arguing that their schools should have grounded literacy instruction in evidence-based practices.

EdStat: From 2002 to 2017, the Percentage of Four-Year-Olds Enrolled in State Pre-K Rose from 14 Percent to 33 Percent

But is government-funded pre-K the surest way to provide the opportunity for all children to succeed in school and life?

Straight Up Conversation: Nat Malkus on What’s Next for Teachers’ Unions After Janus

Nat Malkus is a resident scholar in education policy at AEI.

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

In the News: ‘Access to Literacy’ Is Not a Constitutional Right, Judge in Detroit Rules

On Friday, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by Detroit students who argued that they had been denied access to literacy because of the condition of their schools.

Stealing a Page From Disruption to Transform Accreditation

There is a fundamental mismatch between what accreditors value and what external actors want.

The Education Exchange: Why Did the Supreme Court Change Course on Agency Fees?

On the last day of its 2017-2018 term, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Janus vs. AFSCME that public employee unions can no longer collect agency fees from non-members. Clint Bolick, an associate justice of the Arizona Supreme Court, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss why the U.S. Supreme Court felt it was necessary to overrule a decision from the 1970s allowing agency fees.

EdStat: 54% of Public School Teachers are Opposed to Agency Fees

Only 25% of the public favor collecting union dues from non-members.

In the News: Is This Supreme Court Decision The End Of Teachers Unions?

NPR’s Anya Kamenetz and Cory Turner consider what the Janus ruling will mean for teachers uions in an article that draws on research by Bradley D. Marianno and Katharine O. Strunk that was published recently in Education Next.

Both Teachers and the Public Back Janus Decision by Supreme Court

When it comes to agency fees, the nays have it by a clear majority. No less than 56% of the general public and 54% of public school teachers are opposed.

EdStat: Following the Janus Supreme Court Decision, Unions in 22 States Can No Longer Collect Agency Fees

Six states had already passed right-to-work legislation removing unions’ rights to assess agency fees.

Q&A: Rebecca Friedrichs

Reflections on the Janus v. AFSCME ruling, from the plaintiff in a similar case

Inspecting the Inspector General

Should Auditors Set the Terms of Debate on Federal Education Policy?

EdStat: In the Five Years After Right-to-Work Reform, Union-Dues Revenue per Teacher Decreased by $316 in Wisconsin

These figures suggest that, in right-to-work states, teachers unions lost power not only in numbers, but also in terms of dollar resources.

EdStat: In the Five Years Following Right-to-Work Reform in Wisconsin, the National Education Association (NEA) Affiliate Lost Approximately 52 Percent of its Members

During the same period of time, trends in agency-shop states remained stable.

College Accreditation, Explained

An EdNext guide to how it works, who’s responsible for it, and more

EdStat: The National Education Association is Currently Estimating Membership Losses at 300,000 Nationwide

Membership losses will result in a steep decline in revenue.

EdStat: Six States have Passed Right-to-Work Legislation in the Past Eight Years

An upcoming Supreme Court decision might end the controversial practice of allowing public-sector unions to collect agency fees.

After Janus

A new era of teachers union activism

EdStat: 69 Percent of Americans Support Laws Allowing States to Take Control of Local Districts Where Academic Performance Has Been Low for Several Years

Teachers are less favorable toward these laws but nevertheless lean toward support.

Sponsored Results
Sponsored by

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Sponsored by

Send me the
education next daily email alert
Notify me when
education next posts a big story