The Title IX Spotlight Shifts from the Campus to the Schoolhouse

New federal rules aim at preventing sexual harassment and assault in elementary and secondary education

A Short-Lived Constitutional Right to Education

Full Sixth Circuit will rehear case of Gary B v. Whitmer

Senator Lamar Alexander on the Response to the Coronavirus

“Washington usually messes it up if they get involved, the way they did with Common Core.”

Public-School Attendance Zones Violate a Civil Rights Law

The Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974 may offer creative litigators a strategy to redraw school-assignment maps.

Justices Hear Arguments in L.A. Catholic Schools Case

A sharp question from Justice Thomas: “don’t you think it’s a bit odd that – that things that violate the Establishment Clause, when done in a public school, are not considered religious enough for Free Exercise protection when done in a parochial school?”

A Blueprint for Back to School

What will it take to get schools ready?

Federal Appeals Judges Discover Constitutional Right to “Basic Minimum Education”

Opinion cites 110-degree classrooms, “rodent feces” in Detroit schools.

Statewide Standardized Assessments Were in Peril Even Before the Coronavirus. Now They’re Really in Trouble.

To survive bipartisan backlash, tests will have to “actually help kids learn”

Should DeVos Ask Congress To Waive Parts of the Special Education Law amid the Coronavirus Pandemic?

The best cases for—and against—changing the rules.

Don’t Waive Rights, Require Districts To Make a Good Faith Effort

Forum: Should DeVos Ask Congress To Waive Parts of the Special Education Law amid the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Waive Away—But Tackle the Big Longstanding Issues, Not Just the Immediate Technical Ones

Forum: Should DeVos Ask Congress To Waive Parts of the Special Education Law amid the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Disrupted

Public-education reform in the nation’s capital

Covid-19 Closed Schools. When Should They Reopen?

Expect more closures in fall 2020

Secretary DeVos, It’s Time to Scratch the 2020 State Tests

It’s time to waive the assessment requirements, everywhere and for everyone.

EdNext Podcast: Reforming a Divided School System in Los Angeles

A professor of education policy at the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education, Julie A. Marsh, joins Education Next editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss how education reform has impacted the Los Angeles Unified School District, how it’s deepened divides between the district and teachers unions.

Building on Shaky Ground

Reforming a divided school system in Los Angeles

On Education, Bloomberg Is Everywhere

Democratic presidential candidate gave more than $63 million to education causes in 2017, 2018.

Sanders Outdoes Warren in Tapping Voter Anger

Similar education policies, different New Hampshire primary outcomes

In the News: Chartering in Kansas City

In a new case study for the R Street Institute, “Chartering in Kansas City,” Michael McShane writes about how, with support from farsighted local philanthropists, charter school enrollment has grown to 47 percent of students within the boundaries of the Kansas City Public Schools.

Trump Call for School Choice Echoes in Campaign Context

Janiyah Davis, meet Landel Shakespeare.

Bernie, Bloomberg, Booker, and the New Politics of Education

For three decades, there was a quiet assumption that education’s growing economic import was pushing education politics toward the pragmatic middle—it turns out that this dynamic was surprisingly fragile.

EdNext Podcast: Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments in Espinoza v. Montana

Joshua Dunn, a professor of political science at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, joins Education Next Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the Supreme Court case Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, which challenges Montana’s ban on tax-credit scholarships to religious schools.

Burying Blaine?

Supreme Court hears a mother’s challenge to Montana’s ban on tax-credit scholarships to religious schools

In the News: Oral Arguments in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue

The Supreme Court on Wednesday posted a transcript of this week’s oral arguments in Espinoza V. Montana Department of Revenue, a closely watched case about a Montana state program that provided tax credits to donors who funded scholarships to private schools, including religious schools.

Bye-Bye, Booker

Gone from the Democratic primary, his education policy voice may yet return somehow.

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