Accreditation’s Insidious Impact on Higher Education Innovation

While Washington, D.C. slams accreditors for not holding colleges and universities accountable for their student outcomes, the more insidious failure of accreditation is the stifling effect on innovation at existing institutions.

Pre-K Helps Test Scores in Short Run But Hurts Them Later

The hard reality is that the process of human development is complex and highly varied, so we just don’t know the optimal arrangements for all children.

A Charter Sector Godfather Steps Back

Linda Brown this week announced she was stepping down as CEO of Boston-based Building Excellent Schools.

Are Teacher Preparation Programs Interchangeable Widgets? An Interview With Paul T. von Hippel

States have imposed a variety of rules on teacher candidates and the programs that seek to license them, with the goal of ensuring that all new teachers are ready to succeed on their first day in the classroom. New research challenges the very assumptions underlying these efforts.

Straight Up Conversation: Leading Educators Departing CEO Jonas Chartock

Leading Educators is a nonprofit working with over 700 teacher leaders to transform professional learning for over 2,400 teachers.

More Evidence That Benefits of Government-Funded Pre-K Are Overblown

Supporters of increased investments in state pre-K need to confront the evidence that it does not enhance student achievement meaningfully, if at all. It may, of course, have positive impacts on other outcomes.

Straight Up Conversation: Nat Malkus on What’s Next for Teachers’ Unions After Janus

Nat Malkus is a resident scholar in education policy at AEI.

Where Education Reform Goes from Here

Education reform may be down, but it’s surely not out.

FAFSA Completion Rates Matter: But Mind the Data

When it comes to analyzing completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), it is important to address several measurement challenges.

What Do a Musician, Actor, and Teacher All Have in Common? Guided Instruction

Detailed lesson guides are an effective way to approach instructional design and an empowering way to support teachers.

Why We Get Tech-Enabled Personalized Learning Wrong

Steve Peha explains why digital representations and skill mappings can’t account for the varied ways kids learn

40 Years After the Bakke Decision, What’s the Future of Affirmative Action in College Admissions?

Colleges need to be ready for a world in which considering race in college admissions is no longer legal.

Stealing a Page From Disruption to Transform Accreditation

There is a fundamental mismatch between what accreditors value and what external actors want.

How Education Philanthropy Can Accidentally Promote Groupthink and Bandwagonism

When ambitious foundation efforts go south in ways that cause headaches and problems for the rest of us, it can be hard to tell if anyone is ever held accountable.

Quelle Horreur! New York Times Shocked to Learn That People Who Disagree with the New York Times Have Constitutional Rights

Conservatives didn’t weaponize the First Amendment; the authors of the Bill of Rights did.

The Challenges of Curriculum Materials as a Reform Lever

There is increasing momentum behind the idea that curriculum materials, including textbooks, represent a powerful lever for education reform. This report identifies some specific challenges faced by this approach.

Do Specialized Teaching Roles Help or Hurt Students?

In addition to being content instructors, we also expect teachers to be curriculum designers, assessment creators, and experts at evaluating student work and analyzing student learning data, not to mention experts in classroom management and culture, coaching students on self-management, providing students with social and emotional support, and being the primary school connection with parents and families.

Straight Up Conversation: New Harvard Ed School Dean Bridget Terry Long

Bridget Terry Long, recently named dean of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, on the strengths and opportunities of HGSE and what she hopes to accomplish in the role.

Both Teachers and the Public Back Janus Decision by Supreme Court

When it comes to agency fees, the nays have it by a clear majority. No less than 56% of the general public and 54% of public school teachers are opposed.

Four Things I Wish Incredibles 2 Had Asked About Gifted Kids

The first film was spot-on when it came to exploring adolescent angst, giftedness, and how parents wrestle with simultaneously protecting their kids and pushing them out into the world.

What Have We Learned from the Gates-Funded Teacher Evaluation Reforms?

The real story here is the many insights about implementation—what actually happened on the ground—based on rich qualitative and survey data.

What Accounts for Gaps in Student Loan Default, and What Happens After

Differences in student and family background characteristics can account for about half of the black-white gap in default rates on student loans.

The Gates Effective Teaching Initiative Fails to Improve Student Outcomes

Rand has released its evaluation of the Gates Foundation’s Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching initiative and the results are disappointing.

Straight Up Conversation: TalkingPoints Founder Heejae Lim

TalkingPoints is a messaging app used by 150,000 families and teachers in over 3,000 schools that aims to improve parent-teacher communication—especially for parents who are non-English speakers.

Seven Top Decisions For Leaders Scaling Innovation

While there is no one right pathway to implementing blended or personalized learning, systems do seem to face a consistent set of implementation challenges, regardless of context.

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