A Nobel for Education Next

The editors of Education Next congratulate Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer, two of the three economists who won the 2019 Nobel Prize in economics.

Straight Up Conversation: Can Technology Help Districts Improve Teacher Hiring?

Rick talks with the CEO of Nimble, a venture that uses tech-based solutions to help about 50 school districts (with nearly half a million students) find the teachers they want.

The Metric That Matters Most: Ask Kids, “Are You In?”

The first and most important relationship most children have with a civic institution is with a school.

What Jobs Do Learners Hire Education To Do After High School?

Interviews shed light on student motives, from ‘get away’ to ‘step it up.’

Five Signs Your Reform Has Become Another Education Fad

Eager vendors, early-adopting educators, and media adulation can be taken as evidence that a reform is going swimmingly—but these signs are frequently misread.

Education Prime Minister?

Boris Johnson takes a side in the reading wars.

Straight Up Conversation: Can Outschool Bring the Gig Economy to K-12?

Rick talks with the CEO of Outschool, which is a marketplace for live online classes connecting over 30,000 students with over 1,000 teachers in 50 U.S. states and 35 countries.

Exploring Education Data Reveals Increasing Diversity in Maryland Schools

A new tool makes historical education data easier to find.

Ban Public Schools

The best defense against recent proposals to ban private schools? A good offense.

Straight Up Conversation: Microsoft Chief Talks Augmented Reality in Schools

Dan Ayoub, who helms Microsoft’s education team after a decade leading the famed Halo gaming franchise, discusses the possibilities and pitfalls of bringing augmented and virtual reality to the classroom.

States Can Foster Economic Opportunity by Promoting High-Value Credentials

The choices states make about which industry-recognized credentials “count” will either encourage learners down a meaningful career path or unwittingly steer them toward low-wage, low-skill jobs.

‘Adjunct Underclass’ Author Responds To Review

‘Our tax starvation of public higher ed is a choice we’ve made.’

4 Poll Results That’ll Shape the 2020 Election Education Debates

Parents prize academics, strict discipline.

Straight Up Conversation: The Woman Who’s Trying to Reimagine Testing

Rebecca Kantar leads Imbellus, which has raised more than $24 million to build simulation-based assessments.

The Appeal of Alternative Education

A path outside the conventional structure can save costs, enrich lives.

Bipartisan Bill Would Set Rules for Income Share Agreements

Better incentives for colleges, less loan risk for students.

Three Factors Critical to Rural Charter Schools’ Success

Visitors to charter schools in Questa, New Mexico; Quincy, Florida; Starbuck, Minnesota; and Prescott Valley, Arizona, found some common ingredients.

No, “Personal Responsibility” Is Not Inherently a Racist, Classist Construct

An encounter at Columbia University Teachers College tells a story.

As New York Charters Turn 20, Let Good Schools Flourish

Twenty years ago this summer, I was a founder of the first charter school in New York state: the Sisulu-Walker Charter School of Harlem.

The “Left Behind” Kids Made Incredible Progress From the Late 1990s Until the Great Recession. Here Are Key Lessons for Ed Reform.

A look at a quarter-century of student outcomes is a reminder of the importance of patience.

Straight Up Conversation: Bridge in Nigeria Chief Oladapo Olarinmoye

Bridge in Nigeria is upskilling the teachers of around 300,000 children in 1,500 schools over four years, a rate of scaling which may be unprecedented in African history.

Kids Who Had Been “Left Behind” Are Doing Much Better Today Than 25 Years Ago. But What About the Middle Class?

Achievement is mostly flat, while attainment is up.

The Parable of the Teacher and the Experts

It’s the dawn of a new school year. As I sat down to write about it, I got a premonition of how this school year will once again go for so many.

What Do Education Reform Failures Have in Common?

Education is like parenting — the correct approaches are highly context-specific.

Segregation and the School Choice Movement

When the Ku Klux Klan wanted to outlaw private schools

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