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New Title IX Rules Require Hearings, Cross-Examinations in Colleges But Not High Schools

Comment Deadline Nears For Proposed DeVos Policy

Entree to Freshman Year

Online programs offer low-cost courses for college credit

SPRING 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 2

Turkey’s Fight Against U.S. Charters

An autocrat declares war on high-performing American schools

SPRING 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 2

Turkey wages multimillion-dollar takedown of U.S. charters

Gülen-linked schools suspected of funding global political movement

Online Learning Goes Hollywood

Using video storytelling to motivate learning

SPRING 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 2

Remembering an Education President

George H. W. Bush led by enabling, not mandating, state and local reform

SPRING 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 2

A Novel Take on K–12 Schooling

A review of Roxanna Elden’s Adequate Yearly Progress

SPRING 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 2

The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2018

The most popular articles based on readership

Community Colleges and Career Education

New non-degree programs skip the general education requirements

Election 2018: The Voters Have Spoken

But what did they say about education?

The Benefits of Borrowing

Evidence on student loan debt and community college attainment

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Student borrowers earn more credits, better grades

Being offered federal loans increases academic and long-term success for community college attendees

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Q&A: Eleanor Goetzinger

A veteran teacher reflects on the Oklahoma strike

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

How Personalized Learning Can Support Equity and Excellence

Driving on-grade-level learning, promoting rigorous problem-solving, and more

After the Teacher Walkouts

Will unions shift their focus to the statehouse?

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Adaptation Could Bring New Strength

Forum: After the Teacher Walkouts

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Statewide Strikes Are a Shot Across the Bow

Forum: After the Teacher Walkouts

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Good Advice

Trump overturns Obama guidance on race in public schools

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Teachers’ impact on student behavior matters more for student success than their impact on test scores

Current value-added models are insufficient to identify truly excellent educators

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

The Full Measure of a Teacher

Using value-added to assess effects on student behavior

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Can For-Profit Colleges Rebound?

A second chance to innovate, amid tough market conditions

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Develop and Validate — Then Scale

Lessons from the Gates Foundation’s Effective Teaching Strategy

Looking Past the Wreckage of a Disgraceful Confirmation Process

By securing a conservative majority on the court for the foreseeable future, Kavanaugh’s confirmation can be expected to accelerate ongoing shifts to the right in constitutional doctrine.

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

The Case for (Quality) Homework

Why it improves learning, and how parents can help

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Quality homework shapes students’ learning beliefs and behaviors

Especially for disadvantaged students, homework is a tool for long-term success

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

From Cat Videos and Cooking Tips to the History of the Punic Wars

Educational content comes to YouTube

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Reflections on the Legacy of Bush-Obama School Reform

Why did initially promising, seemingly popular efforts at federal leadership lose their luster?

Health Care for Life

Will teachers’ post-retirement benefits break the bank?

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Unfunded teacher health benefits reach $231 billion nationwide

Amid soaring obligations, expert offers recommendations for states to reduce financial burden

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

The Better Question: How Can We Improve Inclusive Education?

A response to “Has Inclusion Gone Too Far?”

How Can We Improve Special Education Without Asking Uncomfortable Questions?

A response to “The Better Question”

High Expectations Demand High Support

Strengthening college readiness at the California State Universities

Not Just What But Who You Know Matters

An Excerpt from Julia Freeland Fisher’s book “Who You Know”

How Did Major Newspapers Cover the 2018 Teacher Strikes?

Tens of thousands of teachers in six states walked out of their schools, attracting media attention across the country.

The 2018 EdNext Poll–Public support grows for increasing teacher salaries

Plus, charter schools and vouchers gain favor

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Public Support Climbs for Teacher Pay, School Expenditures, Charter Schools, and Universal Vouchers

Results from the 2018 EdNextPoll

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Judging Choice

Court victory for charter schools in Louisiana

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

No, One Limited Study Does Not Prove School Vouchers Don’t Work

Students in the sample weren’t even participating in school-voucher programs

Rethinking the Rules on Federal Higher-Ed Spending

How can Congress spur innovation while clamping down on fraud?

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Change the Rules to Unleash Innovation

Although federal spending on higher education has expanded access, it has also had an unintended effect.

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Strong Hand of Regulation Protects Students

Lawmakers charged with writing a new Higher Education Act (HEA) face a dilemma.

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Privatization in American Education: Rhetoric vs. Facts

Given the recent rhetoric of education reform’s critics, one might be forgiven for thinking that American private schools are at the peak of their influence.

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Where Title IX Went Wrong

A review of “The Transformation of Title IX” by R. Shep Melnick

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Taking Teacher Coaching To Scale

Can Personalized Training Become Standard Practice?

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Teacher coaching improves instruction and student achievement more than other forms of professional development

But larger programs less effective, suggesting difficulty of successfully taking them to scale

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Mainstreaming does not equal access for students with disabilities, who often still lag behind peers

Evidence in favor of inclusion also fails to account for impact on peers and teachers

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Has Inclusion Gone Too Far?

Weighing its effects on students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Who Goes to Private School?

Long-term enrollment trends by family income

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

America’s private elementary schools increasingly serve the affluent

As the number of Catholic schools drops, fewer middle-income families enroll

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Arne Duncan’s Unlearned Lessons

A review of “How Schools Work” by Arne Duncan

WINTER 2019 / VOL. 19, NO. 1

Private Colleges in Peril

Financial pressures and declining enrollment may lead to more closures

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Private colleges vulnerable to more closures amid financial pressure

Predicted drop in number of high school graduates forecasts mounting trouble for small schools

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Q&A: Rebecca Friedrichs

Reflections on the Janus v. AFSCME ruling, from the plaintiff in a similar case

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

A Stubborn Excellence Gap

Despite efforts, diversity stalls at an elite public high school

Elite public high school struggles to diversify student enrollment

Decades of failed admission and outreach procedures offer unexpected insight

Inspecting the Inspector General

Should Auditors Set the Terms of Debate on Federal Education Policy?

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

ED’s Office of Inspector General not a neutral source of ed policy recommendations

By design, OIG prioritizes financial propriety above all else when examining complex issues

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

College Accreditation, Explained

An EdNext guide to how it works, who’s responsible for it, and more

Putting School Budgets in Teachers’ Hands

What if end-users in the classroom made purchasing decisions?

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

After Janus

A new era of teachers union activism

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Kickstarters for Personalized Learning

Local funds promote innovation—but for how long?

Have States Maintained High Expectations for Student Performance?

An analysis of 2017 state proficiency standards

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Despite retreat from Common Core, states set high proficiency standards for students

But rising expectations for performance fail to translate into learning gains

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

The Case for Holding Students Accountable

How extrinsic motivation gets kids to work harder and learn more

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Rating Teacher-Preparation Programs

Can value-added make useful distinctions?

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Ranking teacher-prep programs on value-added is usually futile

New analysis finds program rankings based on graduates’ value-added scores are largely random

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

EVENT: Are State Proficiency Standards Falling?

A new analysis using the latest NAEP data

Higher Ed, Lower Spending

As States Cut Back, Where Has the Money Gone?

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Where has state funding for public colleges gone?

New analysis points to its displacement by soaring spending on public-welfare, particularly Medicaid

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Strengthening the Roots of the Charter-School Movement

How the mom-and-pops can help the sector diversify and grow

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Why the charter movement can’t survive on networks alone

As independent charter schools struggle to grow, expert calls for return to roots

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Trump and the Nation’s Schools

Assessing the administration’s early impact on education

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

A Strong Start on Advancing Reform

Forum: Trump and the Nation’s Schools

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Harmful Policies, Values, and Rhetoric

After little more than a year, President Donald J. Trump’s policies, values, and rhetoric have had a negative impact on our nation’s most vulnerable schoolchildren, particularly low-income students and students of color. This adverse effect is especially pronounced in five areas: oversight of federal education law; enforcement of federal guarantees of educational equity; budget and […]

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Assessing the Trump administration’s early impact on education

Have the President’s policies helped or harmed U.S. students?

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Three Hoover Fellows on NAEP, A Nation at Risk, and the Future of Education Reform

On April 10, the U.S. Department of Education will release the latest results of the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), which will tell us how fourth- and eighth-grade students are faring nationally, in every state, and in most big cities in math and reading. That week also marks the thirty-fifth anniversary of A Nation at Risk.

Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think

A new proposal for reforming teacher education

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Expert in child cognition recommends teacher preparation reforms

“Prepare teachers to be teachers, not scientists”

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

An Elite Grad-School Degree Goes Online

Can Georgia Tech’s virtual master’s increase access to education?

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Online degree expands educational access for mid-career Americans

Georgia Tech’s online version of elite master’s degree in computer science fills gap in higher ed market

Debating Obama-Era Guidance on School Discipline

Should the Trump administration retain, revise, or rescind?

Don’t Walk Back Needed Discipline Reform

In 2014, the Obama administration’s Departments of Education and Justice took an important step to respond to the excessive and racially disparate removal of students from schools across America.

A Supposed Discipline Fix Threatens School Cultures

This wasn’t just routine guidance. Instead, by applying a shambolic version of disparate impact theory to school discipline, the letter marked an enormous shift in federal policy and set up the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) to be both judge and jury.

Judgment Day for Union Agency Fees

High court hears oral argument in Janus v. AFSCME

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

The New Mexico Reform Story

Will Hanna Skandera’s legacy last?

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Closing the Achievement Gap on Chicago’s South Side

A review of The Ambitious Elementary School: Its Conception, Design, and Implications for Educational Equality by Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen

Taking Stock of Private-School Choice

Scholars review the research on statewide programs

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Programs Benefit Disadvantaged Students

School voucher programs, which allow eligible families to send their children to private schools with the help of public funds, have sparked controversy since the first such initiative was launched in Milwaukee in 1991. Today, 28 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) operate 54 private-school-choice programs, which include not only government-issued vouchers but also […]

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Still Waiting for Convincing Evidence

Do public-school students who move to a private school with a government-funded voucher benefit from making this switch? A growing body of research is shedding light on this question. Of particular interest are findings coming out of three states and the District of Columbia, all of which have implemented ambitious voucher programs over the past […]

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Lessons Learned from Indiana

The Indiana Choice Scholarship Program, launched in 2011, offers a rich opportunity to study how a large-scale tuition-voucher program works and to analyze the results it has produced in its first few years. As we consider the merits of private-school choice and what it would take to make it succeed, this initiative deserves particular attention: […]

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Experts debate the merits and design of statewide private school choice programs

A new forum for Education Next brings together experts to assess the research on these programs and the implications for whether and how states should design and oversee statewide choice programs.

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Parenting in the iPhone Age

A review of The Art of Screen Time by Anya Kamenetz and Be the Parent, Please by Naomi Schaefer Riley

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Snap Judgment

Should schools act as community hall monitors?

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Pensions Under Pressure

Charter innovation in teacher retirement benefits

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Charter schools increasingly choose alternative pension plans when given the choice

New retirement options offer teachers portability and shorter vesting periods

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Hey Alexa, Can You Help Kids Learn More?

The next technology that could disrupt the classroom

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Education Myth-Busting in the Age of Fake News

A review of “You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones!” by William Ayers, Crystal Laura, and Rick Ayers

Why Is Charter Growth Slowing?

Lessons from the Bay Area

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

The Main Purpose of Schooling

A review of “The Case against Education,” by Bryan Caplan

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

Researchers identify top three reasons for charter growth slowdown in Bay Area

Lessons from California can inform expansion efforts nationwide

In Defense Of Education’s “Wild West”

Charter schools thrive in the Four Corners states

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Charters and the Common Good

The spillover effects of charter schools in New York City

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Charter schools benefit students in neighboring district schools

Positive effects found on test scores, grade completion, and more, increasing with proximity

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

A Bigger Slice of the Money Pie

Charters in Colorado and Florida win share of local tax dollars

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Colorado and Florida pass breakthrough laws to close charter-school funding gap

States’ differing experiences can inform similar efforts nationwide

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

A Contemplative Approach to Education Policy

A review of Educational Goods: Values, Evidence, and Decision-Making by Harry Brighouse, Helen F. Ladd, Susanna Loeb, and Adam Swift

FALL 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 4

The Schoolhouse Network

How school buildings affect teacher collaboration

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

New research shows teachers’ physical proximity boosts collaboration

Thoughtful classroom assignment can contribute to teacher development strategy

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

The Politics of Choice When the Public School was Born

A review of Public vs. Private by Robert N. Gross

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

Educating Independent Children in a Technologically Dependent World

An excerpt from Be the Parent, Please: Stop Banning Seesaws and Start Banning SnapChat

A Place of Hope in the Segregated South

An excerpt from Eric L. Motley’s memoir Madison Park: A Place of Hope

The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2017

Every December, Education Next releases a list of the most popular articles we published over the course of the year based on readership.

An American Perspective on Chinese Schooling

Michelle Rhee talks with Lenora Chu about her new book, Little Soldiers

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

A Gloomy Perspective on High-Stakes Testing

A review of “The Testing Charade” by Daniel Koretz

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

(Re)Searching for a School

How Choice Drives Parents to Become More Informed

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Expanded choice increases parents’ demand for school-quality information

Having more educational options creates incentive for families to seek out data

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

The Biggest Little Election You’ve Never Heard Of

How a Colorado School-Board Vote Could Boost Vouchers Nationwide

Partisanship and Higher Education: Where Republicans and Democrats Agree

In our most recent public-opinion survey, we find sharp differences between Democrats and Republicans about the value of a bachelor’s degree (as distinct from a two-year associate’s degree).

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

A Pragmatic Approach to Systems Reform

A review of Reinventing America’s Schools by David Osborne

The Power of Teacher Expectations

How racial bias hinders student attainment

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Racial bias hinders college degree attainment

U.S. teachers on average have lower expectations for black students than for white students

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Q&A: Hanna Skandera

New Mexico’s former state chief talks ed reform

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Uncommon Sense for Education Reformers

A review of Commitment and Common Sense by David P. Driscoll

Should We Limit “Screen Time” in School?

Debating the wisest use of technology in the classroom

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Putting Dialogue over Devices Shapes Mind and Character

As we sober up from the tech-infused party of the past 20 years, we should think about what should come first in our schools: shaping not just our students’ ability to persevere and solve difficult problems but also their character—their empathic connection with others, their capacity to see our shared humanity, and their ability to problem solve with others for a common good.

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

The Problem Is Wasted Time, not Screen Time

The emerging generation of educational technology has the power to accelerate learning productivity in ways we can scarcely imagine. If we can ensure that students are connected to it through the help of teachers, a natural balance between online and offline experiences will develop.

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Should K-12 schools limit students’ screen time?

Two educators consider the wisest use of technology in the classroom

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Success Story

A review of “The Education of Eva Moskowitz: A Memoir”

SPRING 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 2

Big Data Transforms Education Research

Can machine learning unlock the keys to great teaching?

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

A Rosy Vision for the Public Schools

A review of “Addicted to Reform” by John Merrow

SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 3

K-12 Accreditation’s Next Move

A storied guarantee looks to accountability 2.0

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Narrow Opening for School Choice

But Blaine Amendments stand, for now

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

CUNY’s New Approach to Transferring College Credit

An excerpt from Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at the City University of New York

How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off by Ed-Tech Vendors

Ten tips for school districts from an industry insider

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Rethinking Federal Regulation of Sexual Harassment

The need for deliberation, not demagoguery, in the Age of Trump

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Policy expert explains why Title IX needs an overhaul

Current “heavy-handed” rules threaten freedom of speech, due process

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Should Professors Ban Laptops?

How classroom computer use affects student learning

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Computer use in college classes reduces final-exam grades

  Computer use in college classes reduces final-exam grades New study finds that technology can be more of a distraction than a learning tool August 17, 2017—The vast majority of college students carry laptops or tablets from class to class. But in between notetaking and consulting references, students are also often sending personal emails or […]

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

The 2017 EdNext Poll on School Reform

Public thinking on school choice, Common Core, higher ed, and more

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Event: The 2017 EdNext Poll on School Reform

What does the public think about school choice, Common Core, and other key issues?

The 2017 EdNext Poll–including the Trump Effect on public opinion about education

Charter schools lose favor but opposition to vouchers declines; Opposition to Common Core plateaus and support for using the same standards across states gains ground

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Taking a Chance, Finding a New Path

An entrepreneur discovers his calling in education

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

A Lasting Impact

High-stakes teacher evaluations drive student success in Washington, D.C

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

D.C.’s high-stakes teacher evaluations raise teacher quality, student achievement

  D.C.’s high-stakes teacher evaluations raise teacher quality, student achievement 90% of the turnover of low-performing teachers occurs in high-poverty schools July 27, 2017—Though the Every Student Succeeds Act excludes any requirements for states about teacher evaluation policies, the results from a once-controversial high-stakes system in Washington, D.C., make a strong case that states should […]

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Louisiana Threads the Needle on Ed Reform

Launching a coherent curriculum in a local-control state

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

The Open Access Dilemma

How can community colleges better serve underprepared students?

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Paying More for Less

A review of “Lower Ed” by Tressie McMillan Cottom

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Competency-Based Education, Put to the Test

An inside look at learning and assessment at Western Governors University

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Changing Our Teens One Family at a Time

A review of “The Vanishing American Adult” by Ben Sasse

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Is the Constitution Colorblind?

Debating Antonin Scalia’s record on race and education

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Equal Protection Bars Racial Favoritism

In his 30 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote surprisingly few opinions in education cases, and even when he did, he seldom mentioned education.

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Choosing Judicial Activism Over Originalism

Justice Antonin Scalia was a staunch proponent of “originalism” in constitutional jurisprudence, an approach to deciding cases based on constitutional text as it was originally understood by its authors.

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Is the U.S. Constitution colorblind?

Revisiting the meaning of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision through the lens of Justice Scalia’s rulings

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Is the Internet Changing Kids’ Brains?

An excerpt from The Reading Mind: A Cognitive Approach to Understanding How the Mind Reads

The Tangled World of Teacher Debt

Clashing rules and uncertain benefits for federal student-loan subsidies

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

The Rich Get Richer

A review of “Dream Hoarders” by Richard V. Reeves

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Lifting the veil on the complex world of teacher debt

Experts offer alternative plan as the Trump administration looks to cut loan forgiveness programs

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO, 4

Pacesetter in Personalized Learning

Summit charter network shares its model nationwide

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Learning from the Science of Learning

A review of “Learn Better,” by Ulrich Boser

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

U-turn on Vouchers

Florida courts uphold tax credits

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Now Trending: Personalized Learning

Can a buzzword deliver on its promise?

FALL 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 4

Why Most Teachers Get a Bad Deal on Pensions

State plans create more losers than winners, and many get nothing at all

Pensions are empty promises for most public-school teachers nationwide

Only 20% of teachers ever receive full benefits, while more than half receive nothing

Reading and Wronging

A review of “Language at the Speed of Sight” by Mark Seidenberg

WINTER 2018 / VOL. 18, NO. 1

Measuring Up

Assessing instructor effectiveness in higher education

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

First-of-its-kind study measures college instructor quality

Effective teachers boost grades and test scores, in both their own and subsequent courses

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

More Options in Indianapolis

Mayoral charters and innovation schools expand choice

School Desegregation in Washington, D.C., in the 1950s

An excerpt from the memoir This African-American Life

Boosting Hispanic College Completion

Does high-school recruiting help more students graduate?

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Boosting college quality and success for high-scoring Hispanic students

Recognition program facilitates targeted higher-ed recruitment, improves outcomes

Summer 2017 / Vol. 17, No. 3

Justice Gorsuch, Meet James G. Blaine

The Supreme Court has a new opportunity to clarify matters in a case scheduled for oral argument on April 19, just days after Justice Neil Gorsuch’s arrival on the bench.

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Reform is a State of Mind

An excerpt from Letters to a Young Education Reformer

Special Education Standards

Supreme Court raises level of benefit

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Clown School

A review of “Class Clowns: How the Smartest Investors Lost Billions in Education” by Jonathan A. Knee

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

Redshirting may do more harm than good

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

‘Redshirting’ preschoolers may do more harm than good

Educator and researcher agree that it’s generally not worth it to delay kindergarten start time

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

A $20 Billion Federal School Choice Tax Credit Program: Yes, no, maybe, how so

The Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Education Next, and the Hoover Institution have teamed up to bring forth two pointed discussions, each centered around a critical question.

On Teaching Controversy

A review of “The Case for Connection” by Jonathan Zimmerman and Emily Robertson

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Hamilton Goes to High School

How students are learning U.S. history from the hottest show on Broadway

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Is Test-Based Accountability Dead?

Three experts weigh in, and look to the future

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Why Accountability Matters, and Why It Must Evolve

Try to think of an education policy that 1) has been shown, in dozens of studies across multiple decades, to positively affect student outcomes; 2) has the overwhelming support of parents and voters; 3) reinforces many other policies and facilitates quality research; and 4) has been used widely at the district, state, and national levels for decades or more.

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Futile Accountability Systems Should Be Abandoned

Is test-based accountability “on the wane”? The question is based on a fallacy. For something to be on the wane, it has to exist, and test-based accountability has never truly existed in the United States.

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

If Parents Push for It, Accountability Can Work

The greatest trick the devil ever pulled in education is convincing the American public that we have had test-based accountability. The media and politicians adopted the rhetoric of “high stakes” tests without bothering to ask the question: what, exactly, are the stakes?

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Vague Answers to Pointed Questions

A teacher-parent-wonk shops for a school

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

New Blueprints for K–12 Schools

Innovative design supports blended learning

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

The Trump Administration’s $20 Billion School Choice Plan

Debating the wisdom of this idea, and what it might look like in reality

Go Big on School Choice for All 50 States

Forum: The Trump administration’s $20 billion school choice plan

For the Love of Choice, Don’t Federalize It

Forum: The Trump administration’s $20 billion school choice plan

A Common Core Curriculum Quandary

For Eureka Math, open-source leads to a revenue stream

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Gorsuch, the Judicious Judge

A Common-Sense Approach to Education Issues

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

What could we expect from a Justice Gorsuch on key education issues?

Arizona Supreme Court Justice Clint Bolick reviews the nominee’s major cases

Competency-Based Learning for Teachers

Can micro-credentials reboot professional development?

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Reconsidering the Supreme Court’s Rodriguez Decision

Is there a federal constitutional right to education?

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Inequitable Schools Demand a Federal Remedy 

Rodriguez will one day be considered as erroneous as the court’s approval of the “separate but equal” doctrine in Plessy v. Ferguson.

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Federal Courts Can’t Solve Our Education Ills

As a matter of constitutional law, Rodriguez was correctly decided.

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Experts consider a federal constitutional right to education

  Experts consider a federal constitutional right to education Should the Supreme Court’s 1973 Rodriguez decision be overturned? February 16, 2017—In its 1973 decision in San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez, the Supreme Court ruled that the U.S. Constitution does not guarantee a right to education. The 5-4 decision left issues of educational inequality […]

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Hands Off My Tenure!

Unions challenge constitutionality of reforms

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

The Long Path to ESSA

An excerpt from “The Every Student Succeeds Act: What It Means for Schools, Systems, and States”

Making Evidence Locally

Rethinking education research under the Every Student Succeeds Act

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

ESSA could fund crucial shift in education research

Small-scale studies are the only path to sustained improvement, says expert

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Undoing Irrational Thinking

A review of The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis

Scholar, Teacher, and Revisionist

Remembering David Tyack, who showed contemporary education reformers a nuanced view of American schooling’s past

Reforming Remediation

College students mainstreamed into statistics are more likely to succeed

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

College students assessed as needing remedial algebra more likely to succeed by instead taking credit-bearing statistics with additional support

The study, which was conducted at three community colleges at the City University of New York, represents the first controlled test of an alternative to traditional remediation.

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Opposing Perspectives on Student Debt

Is the college loan crisis reality or myth?

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

How I Became a D.tech Dragon

Learning to think in a new way

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Under New Administration, Small Measures Could Foster Big Change

The best solution may be to offer federal support for programs that the states themselves design, advancing the cause of school choice while respecting the principle of local control that Trump has also championed.

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Will the XQ “Super Schools” Live Up to Their Name?

A new philanthropy’s competition to reinvent high school

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

A New Path to a College Degree

Match Beyond helps low-income students succeed

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

School Disruption on the Small Scale

Can micro-schools break out of an elite niche?

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

The Teacher Evaluation Revamp, In Hindsight

What the Obama administration’s signature reform got wrong

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

What Obama’s Signature Education Reform Got Wrong

Four lessons offer guidance for next administration

A Judicious Overview of the Charter Movement

A review of “Charter Schools at the Crossroads” by Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, and Brandon L. Wright

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Betsy DeVos, the (Relatively Mainstream) Reformer

A long record refutes the radical image of the education secretary

SUMMER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 3

Lessons on Common Core

Critical books offer more folly than wisdom

The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2016

Here are the most popular articles we published over the course of the last year.

The Top 10 Education Next Blog Entries of 2016

This year’s runaway hit was How We Make Teaching Too Hard for Mere Mortals by Robert Pondiscio.

What Do Parents Think of Their Children’s Schools?

EdNext poll compares charter, district, and private schools nationwide

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

How Satisfied are Parents with Their Children’s Schools?

New evidence from a U.S. Department of Education survey

SPRING 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 2

Two National Surveys find Charter-School Parents More Satisfied than Those with Children in District-Operated Schools

Private school parents most satisfied of all

Old Legal Wine in New Remedial Bottles

Plaintiffs seek to overturn Rodriguez

How Do Parental Perceptions of Schools Vary Across Sectors?

Evidence from two national surveys comparing charter, district, and private schools

The Charter Model Goes to Preschool

Despite obstacles, innovative new programs expand access

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Remembering an Academic, Entrepreneur, and Leader

John Chubb’s pioneering work in education policy

Teacher Race and School Discipline

Are students suspended less often when they have a teacher of the same race?

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Open Educational Resources

Is the federal government overstepping its role?

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

The Problem with Pencils

Using computers — and creativity — to customize instruction

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Nobel Lessons for Education Researchers and Policymakers

Bengt Holmstrom’s work shows that no incentives are often preferable to poorly-designed incentives.

Raising More Than Test Scores

Does attending a “no excuses” charter high school help students succeed in college?

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

No-excuses charter students more likely to enroll in competitive, four-year colleges

Controversial educational approach leads to postsecondary success for Chicago students

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Education Reform’s Race Debate

An Education Next Forum

Let’s Build a Modern Reform Coalition

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Judge Reformers by Results, Not Race

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Make Diversity a Key Value in Reform

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

School Reform Must Serve Social Justice Goals

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Reform Leaders: You’re Fired

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Engage Communities, But Stay Focused on Results

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

School Reform Family Feud

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

New Priorities for Equity in Reform

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Chauvinism versus Social Justice

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

Debunking the Myth of the “Teacher Pay Gap,” Again

After adjusting for pensions and other benefits, teacher compensation is neither low nor falling

What Do We Know About School Discipline Reform?

Assessing the alternatives to suspensions and expulsions

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Research lacking on school discipline reforms

Thin evidence on causes of and alternatives to suspensions, expulsions

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

How Should States Design Their Accountability Systems?

Education Next talks with Jeb Bush, Heather Hough, and Michael Kirst

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Florida’s Intuitive Letter Grades Produce Results

In Florida, where I served as governor from 1999 to 2007, a bold, new direction was required. And so in 1999, we overhauled our school system through accountability legislation that made student learning the focus of education.

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

California’s Dashboard Data Will Guide Improvement

In California, we’ve moved beyond assigning schools a single number score each year and are implementing a “dashboard” accountability system, to better capture and communicate multiple dimensions of school performance.

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Rich Insights on Poverty

A review of “Coming of Age in the Other America,” by Stefanie DeLuca, Susan Clampet-Lundquist, and Kathryn Edin

Common Confusion

Most kids in America aren’t on track for success. Why don’t they and their parents know it?

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

The Not-So-Golden Mean

A review of “The End of Average” by Todd Rose

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Ed Reform Rollback in New York City

Mayor de Blasio’s efforts remain a work in progress

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Averaging in Education

It’s how you use it that counts

What’s Holding Back the Growth of the Best Charter Schools?

An excerpt from The Founders by Richard Whitmire

American Public Opinion on K-12 Education Policy: Lessons from a decade of polling

Sponsors Sept. 16, 2016, 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM Hoover Institution in Washington, D.C., The Johnson Center 1399 New York Avenue NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005 This year Education Next celebrates the tenth anniversary of its annual survey of public opinion on K-12 education policy. This year’s results from the 2016 survey are discussed […]

Ten-year Trends in Public Opinion From the EdNext Poll

Common Core and vouchers down, but many other reforms still popular

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Graphic: Results from the 2016 Education Next Poll

An interactive graphic displaying results from this year’s survey.

Graphic: Trends in the EdNext Poll Over Time

An interactive look at the EdNext poll through the past decade

The 2016 EdNext Poll – including 10-year trends in public opinion

Common Core and vouchers lose ground; growing opposition to tenure; charter schools and testing retain support

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

How and Why Districts and Charters Engage

Lessons from Cleveland

Street-Savvy School Reform

Lessons learned from six big-city school systems

An Open Letter to Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan

Focus your philanthropy on innovation outside the system

School Closures In New York City

Did students do better after their high schools were closed?

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Study finds school closures in NYC benefitted rising ninth-graders

Students enrolled in higher performing high schools, more likely to earn Regents diploma

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Continuing Change in Newark

To protect reform, Chris Cerf builds collaborative relationships

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Change takes a positive turn in Newark

Superintendent Cerf fosters bipartisan support to improve student achievement

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Strictly Discrimination

Supreme Court favors race-based policies

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Think Big, Go Small

A different approach to starting a school

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

The Politics of the Common Core Assessments

Why states are quitting the PARCC and Smarter Balanced testing consortia

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

States curb Common Core opposition by leaving testing consortia

Thirty-eight states have left either PARCC, Smarter Balanced, or both since 2010

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

The Promise and Pitfalls of Virtual Charter Schools

A forum by Tom Vander Ark and Greg Richmond

Online Charters Expand Learning Options

With the rise of options for anywhere, anytime digital learning, statewide schools play an important role in providing equitable access to a variety of quality learning pathways.

Online Charters Mostly Don’t Work

Nearly every study of virtual school performance has found their performance to be lacking.

When Practice Does Make Perfect

A review of “Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise” by Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool

WINTER 2017 / VOL. 17, NO. 1

Ed Reform Battle in Los Angeles

Conflict escalates as charter schools thrive

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Reaping the Whirlwind

Union victory on tenure may be short-lived

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Making Sense of the Opt-Out Movement

Education Next talks with Scott Levy and Jonah Edelman

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Opt-Out Reflects the Genuine Concerns of Parents

Forum: Making Sense of the Opt-Out Movement

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

This Issue Is Bigger Than Just Testing

Forum: Making Sense of the Opt-Out Movement

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

New analyses of opt-out movement offer fresh perspectives

Although less likely to be economically disadvantaged, opt-out students tended to be lower-achieving than test takers in New York State last year

FALL 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 4

Incomplete Reform in Baltimore

A shift in authority to school leaders falls short

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

Once promising reforms stall in Baltimore

Student performance low, principal attrition high in Charm City

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

Icahn Charter Schools build background knowledge to drive learning

Student achievement places Icahn among NYC’s top performing charter networks

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

The Bronx is Learning

Content-rich curriculum drives achievement at Icahn Charter School

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

Virtual Reality Disruption

Will 3-D technology break through to the educational mainstream?

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

One Hundred Miles and a World Apart

A review of “The Battle for Room 314” and “The Secret Lives of Teachers”

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

Teaching Character

A review of “Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance” by Angela Duckworth and “Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why” by Paul Tough

Fall 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 4

Not Leaving, Just Changing Jobs

This is the last issue of Education Next for which I will serve as editor-in-chief.

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Testing College Readiness

Massachusetts compares the validity of two standardized tests

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

PARCC and Massachusetts state exams predict college success equally well

In math, PARCC’s college-ready cutoff score is set at a higher level than the MCAS proficiency cutoff

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

The End of the Bush-Obama Regulatory Approach to School Reform

Choice and competition remain the country’s best hope

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Bush-Obama regulations fail to generate sustained gains in student achievement

School choice and competition remain the best hope for improving schools

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Entrepreneurs in the Ed Tech Market

An excerpt by Stacey Childress from Educational Entrepreneurship Today, Hess and McShane, eds.

High School of the Future

Cutting-edge model capitalizes on blended learning to take personalization further

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Should Reformers Support Education Savings Accounts?

Education Next talks with Matthew Ladner and Nelson Smith

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

The Next Step in School Choice

Should Reformers Support Education Savings Accounts?

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Two school choice proponents argue the merits of education savings accounts

Education savings account (ESAs) provide parents with most or all of funds the state would have spent on a child’s education, allowing parents to pay for public school alternatives, such as tutoring, online courses, private school tuition, or a combination of other educational services.

SUMMER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 3

Expand Choice, but Keep the Public Interest in Mind

Should Reformers Support Education Savings Accounts?

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

It Pays to Improve School Quality

States that boost student achievement could reap large economic gains

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Massive economic gains for states that invest in student achievement

Fifty-state effort could increase GDP by $76 trillion over next 80 years

SUMMER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 3

Justice Deferred

Supreme Court lets agency fees stand

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Denver Expands Choice and Charters

Elected school board employs portfolio strategy to lift achievement

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

School choice, charters propel achievement in Denver schools

Principals and schools use autonomy to drive results

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

The EdNext Podcast

The EdNext Podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Soundcloud, Stitcher and here every Wednesday.

A Flipping Experiment

Innovative teaching strategies rev up learning

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Innovation in Catholic Education

New approaches to instruction and governance may revitalize the sector

Using Blended Learning to Design Schools that Motivate Students

An excerpt from “Blended” by Michael B. Horn and Heather Staker

Teacher Home Visits

School-family partnerships foster student success

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Why Background Knowledge is Crucial for Literacy

An excerpt of “Reading Reconsidered” by Doug Lemov, Colleen Driggs and Erica Woolway

The Trouble with Texting

A review of “The 160-Character Solution,” by Benjamin L. Castleman

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

“Children, be quiet and watch your lesson”

The case for video time during class

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Ready for Play Time?

A review of “The Importance of Being Little,” by Erika Christakis

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Connecting to Practice

How we can put education research to work

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Teacher, Mentor, Colleague

James Coleman generously shared his knowledge and expertise

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

How Family Background Influences Student Achievement

Can schools narrow the gap?

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

The Immensity of The Coleman Data Project

Gaining clarity on the report’s flaws will improve future research

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

School choice benefits extend far beyond test scores

Urban minority students enrolled in district school alternatives more likely to graduate high school, enroll in college

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

Schools of Choice

Expanding opportunity for urban minority students

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

In Schools, Teacher Quality Matters Most

Today’s research reinforces Coleman’s findings

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Let My People Go

Teachers fight to end forced union contributions

After Common Core, States Set Rigorous Standards

Forty-five states raise the student proficiency bar

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Forty-five States Increased Academic Proficiency Standards between 2011 and 2015

Commitments to Common Core generate record gains in state standards, no states receive failing grade

Summer 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 3

Desegregation Since the Coleman Report

Racial composition of schools and student learning

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Are U. S. Schools Really Resegregating?

Segregation still in decline despite decreasing black exposure to white students

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Equality of Educational Opportunity Today: Reconsidering the Coleman Report on its 50th Anniversary

An Education Next Event

Game Plan for Learning

Building on Coleman’s early theories, new academic competitions motivate students to achieve

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

New academic games motivate students to achieve

Coleman’s early theories on competition increase student engagement

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

Work Within and Outside Traditional Schooling

A review of “The Split Screen Strategy,” by Ted Kolderie

What Matters for Student Achievement

Updating Coleman on the influence of families and schools

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Black-White Achievement Gap Makes Little Progress Since 1960s

Greatest gains in South which has caught up with the rest of the country

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

The Life and Times of James S. Coleman

Hero and villain of school policy research

Spring 2016 / Vol. 16, No. 2

Revisiting the Coleman Report

“Equality of Educational Opportunity” on its 50th Anniversary

How States Should Navigate New Opportunities Under ESSA (Part 1 of 2)

Advice from Nina Rees, Greg Richmond, Aimee Rogstad Guidera, and Mike Magee

More on How States Should Navigate New Opportunities Under ESSA (Part 2 of 2)

Advice from Charles Barone, Bill Jackson, Dane Linn, and Linda Darling-Hammond

The Top 10 Education Next Blog Entries of 2015

Each year we publish a list of the most popular entries on the Education Next blog. There’s usually a surprise or two and the 2015 list is no exception.

The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2015

Which topics were most popular with Education Next readers in 2015?

High-Achieving Countries Leave America Behind

A review of “Failing Our Brightest Kids” by Chester E. Finn Jr. and 
Brandon L. Wright

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

In Newark, a Gift Wasted?

A review of “The Prize: Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools?” by Dale Russakoff

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

Uncommon Confusion

Washington Supreme Court strikes down charter schools

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

A Bad Bargain

How teacher collective bargaining affects students’ employment and earnings later in life

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Voucher Victory

“Disingenuous” federal officials lose battle to shut down Louisiana Scholarship Program

Collective bargaining has negative impact on students’ future earnings and employment

New study offers first evidence of the long-term effects of duty-to-bargain laws

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Learning English

Accountability, Common Core, and the college-for-all movement are transforming instruction

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

States Move Toward Dual-Immersion and English-Immersion Instruction

Rising standards and accountability initiatives have spotlighted weak ELL programs

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

America’s Mediocre Test Scores

Education crisis or poverty crisis?

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Does Poverty Explain the Mediocre Performance of American Schools?

U.S. students from both affluent and low-income homes underperform their peers in other countries

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

When Does Accountability Work?

Texas system had mixed effects on college graduation rates and future earnings

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Test-based accountability has beneficial long-term effects on the graduation rates and future earnings of disadvantaged Texas students attending schools at risk of failing, new study finds

But disadvantaged students at schools seeking recognition for high performance suffer education and income losses.

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

America’s Smart Kids Left Behind

Catching up to our global peers will require changing education policy and culture

Should Community College Be Free?

Education Next talks with Sara Goldrick-Rab and Andrew Kelly

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

The Economy Needs More Workers with Associate Degrees

Forum: Should Community College Be Free?

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Tuition Is Not the Main Obstacle to Student Success

Forum: Should Community College Be Free?

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Moving Edtech Forward

School networks AltSchool and Summit are betting on a breakthrough

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

History Lessons from a Policy Insider

A review of Presidents, Congress and The Public Schools, by Jack Jennings

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Teachers Unions at Risk of Losing “Agency Fees”

Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association could fundamentally alter the education labor landscape

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

A Different Kind of Military School

A review of “Strugglers into Strivers: What the Military Can Teach Us about How Young People Learn and Grow” by Hugh B. Price

SUMMER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 3

One Point Short

Let’s not define students by their test scores

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

The Ideal Blended-Learning Combination

Is one-third computer time about right?

SPRING 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 2

Heading for a Fall

State restrictions on voucher programs rest on shaky foundation

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Learning about Learning

A review of Knowledge Capital of Nations by Eric A. Hanushek and Ludger Woessmann

Education Department Letter Strays Far From Civil Rights Act

Education mandate will create paperwork, not improve minority education

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Civil Wrongs

Federal equity initiative promotes paperwork, not equality

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

High Marks for Games in the Classroom

A review of The Game Believes in You, by Greg Toppo

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

The 2015 EdNext Poll on School Reform

Public thinking on testing, opt out, common core, unions, and more

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

2015 EdNext Poll: Public Backs Testing, Opposes “Opt-out” Movement

Support for Common Core State Standards slips, but opponents are still in the minority; a majority opposes requirements to balance discipline rates across race; only a minority backs union fees for non-union teachers; support for charter schools and tax credits to fund private school scholarships dips, but a majority still favors them

WINTER 2016 / VOL. 16, NO. 1

Next Generation Virtual Programs

Through Course Access, students choose from a range of providers

Good News for New Orleans

Early evidence shows reforms lifting student achievement

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

The New Orleans OneApp

Centralized enrollment matches students and schools of choice

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Many Options in New Orleans Choice System

School characteristics vary widely

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

New Orleans Reforms Boost Student Performance

Families have many options as 93 percent of public school students attend charter schools

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

The Myth About the Special Education Gap

Charter enrollments driven by parental choices, not discriminatory policies

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Charter Schools Do Not Appear to Discriminate Against Special Education Students

Students with disabilities more likely to remain in charters than in district schools

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Results of President Obama’s Race to the Top

Win or lose, states enacted education reforms

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

What Did Race to the Top Accomplish?

Education Next talks with Joanne Weiss and Frederick M. Hess

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Lofty Promises But Little Change for America’s Schools

In July 2009, it wasn’t just about the money. The $4 billion (to be spent over four years) amounted to less than 1 percent of what K‒12 schooling spends each year.

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Innovative Program Spurred Meaningful Education Reform

Much has been said about the impact of the Race to the Top program—some good, some not so good, some accurate, some less so.

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Race to the Top Competition Changes State Education Policies

Winners enact new initiatives, strengthen standards and expand charters

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Wisconsin High School Reaches High International Benchmarks in Math and Reading

Participating in international testing motivates both educators and students

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Wisconsin High Schools Learn from New PISA Test

International comparison drives efforts to improve

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

A Day at the Khan Lab School

Inquiry and self-direction guide student learning

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Digital Games Promise to Improve Math Skills

An excerpt from Greg Toppo’s The Game Believes in You

Disparate Impact Indeed

Court’s latest ruling will hurt minority students

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Tracking Is a District Problem

A review of “On the Same Track” by Carol Corbett Burris

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Taking On the Opportunity Gap

A review of “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis” by Robert D. Putnam

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Increased Per-Pupil Spending Yields Improved Educational Attainment and Higher Future Wages for Students from Low-Income Families

How money is spent matters; school districts use unexpected increases more productively than they use other resources

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings

Does school spending matter after all?

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

CREDO Reveals Successful Charters’ Secret Sauce

What are the general lessons to be learned from the many case studies of successful chartering?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

New York City’s Small-Schools Revolution

Breaking up large high schools improved graduation rates

Power to the People

A review of “The School Choice Journey” by Thomas Stewart and Patrick J. Wolf

The Origins of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

Excerpts from No Struggle, No Progress: A Warrior’s Life from Black Power to Education 
Reform

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Should Personalization Be the Future of Learning?

Benjamin Riley and Alex Hernandez square off

At Success Academy, Strong Content and Curriculum are Keys to Success

Progressive education techniques and innovative teacher training help the charters outperform NYC public schools

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Explains Success at Success Academy?

Charter network focuses on what is being taught, and how

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Twitter Says about the Education Policy Debate

And how scholars might use it as a research tool

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Breaking the Mold

A review of A Democratic Constitution for Public Education, by Paul T. Hill and Ashley E. Jochim

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

How NYC Expanded Its Charter Sector

An excerpt from Joel Klein’s Lessons of Hope

States Raise Proficiency Standards in Math and Reading

Commitments to Common Core may be driving the proficiency bar upward

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

More Middle-Class Families Choose Charters

A political game changer for public school choice?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The Rise of AltSchool and Other Micro-schools

Combinations of private, blended, and at-home schooling meet needs of individual students

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Turnaround School Districts

States try managing lowest-performing schools

Boot Camps for Charter Boards

Finding and training civic-minded leaders

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

School Reform for Rural America

Innovate with charters, expand career and technical education

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

School Closings Due to Bad Weather Have Little to No Effect on Student Achievement

But individual absences caused by weather when schools don’t close have negative effects on achievement

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

In Defense of Snow Days

Students who stay home when school is in session are a much larger problem

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

We’re All Art Teachers

Don’t try to quantify its worth

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Twenty States Increased Academic Proficiency Standards between 2011 and 2013

For the first time since the passage of No Child Left Behind, state standards have risen; all states that show strong improvements have adopted Common Core

A Breakout Role for Teachers

Excerpts from The Cage-Busting Teacher

How Many Charter Schools is Just Right?

Education Next talks with Scott Pearson, John H. “Skip” McKoy, and Neerav Kingsland

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The New Orleans Case for All-Charter School Districts

Across the country, children in urban districts are being denied rich, rigorous educational opportunities.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

D.C. Students Benefit from Mix of Charter and Traditional Schools

Charter schools are revolutionizing public schooling in Washington, D.C. In just 18 years, charter schools have grown from an initial 5 to 112 schools today, managed by 61 nonprofit organizations.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Education Gap Grows for Adolescents from Single-Parent Families

Young people raised in one-parent homes complete fewer years of schooling and are less likely to receive a B. A. degree

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to children of unmarried mothers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

One-Parent Students Leave School Earlier

Education attainment gap widens

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Fool’s Gold

Office of Civil Rights takes on school finance

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Match Corps Goes National

Successful high-dosage tutoring model spreads to other schools

How Can Schools Address America’s Marriage Crisis?

Prepare young people for rewarding careers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Purposeful Parenthood

Better planning benefits new parents and their children

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

The Meaning of Community at Democracy Prep

School culture supports students and their families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Black Men and the Struggle for Work

Social and economic barriers persist

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

More Harm Than Good

A review of “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed,” by Jason L. Riley

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

A Tribute to Martha Derthick

With Martha Derthick’s passing on January 12, 2015, America lost one of its preeminent scholars of American politics.

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

New Hampshire’s Journey Toward Competency-Based Education

State lifts barriers to innovation, allowing districts and charters to personalize learning

Family Breakdown and Poverty

To flourish, our nation must face some hard truths

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Race and Poverty in Baltimore

A review of “The Long Shadow” by Karl Alexander, Doris Entwisle, and Linda Olson

Spring 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

U.S. Students from Two-Parent Families Achieve a Grade Level Higher than Peers from Single-Parent Families

The United States has one of the highest percentages of single-parent families among developed countries

An International Look at the Single-Parent Family

Family structure matters more for U.S. students

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

What Does Online Learning Look Like?

Examples from Florida and Pennsylvania

50 Years after the Moynihan Report, More than One-Quarter of Young Black Males Are Neither Employed nor Enrolled in School or Vocational Training

The incarceration rate for young black men without a high school diploma rose from 10 percent in 1980 to 37 percent by 2008

Government Should Subsidize, Not Tax, Marriage

Social policies have influenced the rate of growth in single-parent families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Wrong Diagnosis on Homework Help from Parents

A review of “The Broken Compass: Parental Involvement with Children’s Education” by Keith Robinson and Angel L. Harris

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Single-Parent Families: Revisiting the Moynihan Report 50 Years Later

An event will take place on March 5 in Washington, D.C.

An Uncommon Leader

A review of No Struggle, No Progress by Howard Fuller

Does Better Observation Make Better Teachers?

New evidence from a 
teacher evaluation pilot in Chicago

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

NYC’s Former Schools Chancellor Recounts Struggles and Successes

A review of Joel Klein’s “Lessons of Hope”

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Moynihan and the Single-Parent Family

The 1965 report and its backlash

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

In the U.S., Nearly a Quarter of All Children Live with an Unmarried Mother

50 years after the Moynihan Report, the percentage of children in mother-only families has risen from around 25% to 50% among blacks, and around 7% to 19% among whites.

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Revisiting the Moynihan Report on its 50th Anniversary

Education Next is running a series of articles on the state of the American family.

Modern Maturity for Charter Schools

Litigation shows they have arrived

The Top Education Next Articles of 2014

Just the facts, please!

Moving Toward a Teaching Profession

A review of The Teacher Wars by Dana Goldstein

Fixing Detroit’s Broken School System

Improve accountability 
and oversight for district and charter schools

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Jeb Bush Speaks Out

Talking education policy with Florida’s former governor

Common Core in the Classroom

New standards help teachers create effective lesson plans

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, No. 1

Disruptive Innovation in Practice

A review of Michael B. Horn’s and Heather Staker’s “Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Teachers Unions and the Common Core

Standards inspire collaboration and dissent

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

A New Breed of Journalism

Education coverage is on the rise

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Experimental Study Shows Major Benefits for Students Who Attend Live Theater

Culturally enriching field trips increase knowledge, tolerance, and the ability to read emotions of others

Learning from Live Theater

Students realize gains in knowledge, tolerance, and more

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Methodological Appendix for the Live Theater Experimental Study

Learning from Live Theater Education Next, Winter 2015 Empirical Strategy Because the randomized controlled trial approach has the important feature of generating comparable treatment and control groups, we can use a straightforward set of analytic techniques, designed for use in social experiments, to estimate the impact of a school field trip to see live theater […]

Criticizing Charter Schools for Lacking Diversity and Unions Misses the Point

A review of A Smarter Charter by Richard D. Kahlenberg and Halley Potter

What Effective Schools Do

Stretching the cognitive limits on achievement

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Teachers Unions and the War Within

Making sense of the conflict

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Diplomas Must Recognize College and Career Readiness

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Hold Students Accountable and Support Them

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Different Kids Need Different Credentials

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Rethinking the 
High School Diploma

Education Next talks with 
Chester E. Finn, Jr., Richard D. Kahlenberg and Sandy Kress

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Does Student Attrition Explain KIPP’s Success?

Evidence on which students leave KIPP middle schools and who replaces them

FALL 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 4

Disrupting 
the Education 
Monopoly

A conversation with
 Netflix CEO Reed Hastings

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

The Philadelphia School District’s Ongoing Financial Crisis

Why the district has a money problem

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Collective Panic

Court decision terrifies unions

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Substantial Opportunities for Improving Teacher Evaluations Lie in the Area of Classroom Observations

Researchers recommend adjusting classroom observation scores for student demographics, using observations conducted by trained external observers

The Force Behind Sisulu-Walker

A review of Mary C. Bounds’ “A Light Shines in Harlem: New York’s First Charter School and the Movement It Led”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Effective Schools Help Students Outperform Expectations Based on Cognitive Skills

Differences in school effectiveness have important consequences for students’ academic achievement.

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Support for Common Core Slips, But Majority of Public Still In Favor

2014 EdNext poll finds while the public, on average, gives 50% of teachers in their local schools an A or a B grade, 22% are given a D or an F

Inside Successful District-Charter Compacts

Teachers and administrators collaborate to share best practices

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Also teacher grades, school choices, and other findings from the 2014 EdNext poll. Full results also available at education next.org/edfacts

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Cracking the Code of Effective Teaching

A review of Elizabeth Green’s “Building a Better Teacher”

Student Achievement Gains at KIPP Schools Cannot Be Explained by Student Attrition

Study finds students are similar to those in other local schools and most patterns of attrition are no different

Accountability for Students: Exit Exams

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools, a new book edited by Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Richard Sousa

Expand Your Reach

New-world role combines coaching teachers and teaching students

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Reporting Opinion, Shaping an Agenda

A review of ‘Teachers Versus the Public,’ by Paul E. Peterson, Michael Henderson and Martin R. West

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Beyond the Factory Model

Oakland teachers learn how to blend

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Standards and Testing in the Obama Administration

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools

Catholic School Closures and the Decline of Urban Neighborhoods

A review of ‘Lost Classroom, Lost Community’ by Margaret F. Brinig and Nicole Stelle Garnett

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Ending Our Neglect of Gifted Students

It’s a matter of fairness, equal opportunity , and long-term societal well-being.

Addressing Race Disparities in K‒12 School Discipline

Does the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education’s “Dear Colleague Letter” miss the mark on civil-rights enforcement?

Civil Rights Enforcement Gone Haywire

The federal government’s new school-discipline policy

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Learning in the Digital Age

Better educational apps are coming

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Still Reforming after All These Years

A conversation with Houston Independent School District Superintendent Terry Grier

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Charters Should Be Expected to Serve All Kinds of Students

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

School Quality Matters Most, Whether District or Charter

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Education Next talks with Robin J. Lake, Gary Miron, and Pedro A. Noguera

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

The Key Is Innovation, Not Regulation

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Facing the Union Challenge

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead

Script Doctors

A compelling play on the wrong stage?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Early Teacher Retirement Program Does Not Adversely Affect Student Achievement

Program costly, but in low-income schools small learning gains observed

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Expanding the Options

The United States has expanded school choice in the last few decades, and much of the published world’s research has been carried out in this country.

U.S. Students from Educated Families Fall Short in Math Proficiency on Global Stage

U.S. ranks 27th out of 34 OECD countries overall; 28th among students with at least one college-educated parent

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Credit Recovery Hits the Mainstream

Accountability lags for online options

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

How Private Schools Adapt to Vouchers: Eden Grove Academy

This case study is drawn from “Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.”

Early Retirement Payoff

Incentive programs for veteran teachers may boost student achievement

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Despite Success in New York City, It’s Time for Charters to Guard Their Flanks

School districts and teachers unions are fighting charters with renewed energy.

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Texas Ten Percent Plan Brings More Students to State’s Flagship Universities

But automatic admission causes drop in comparable private and out-of-state colleges

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Texas Ten Percent Plan’s Impact on College Enrollment

Students go to public universities instead of private ones

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

No Progress Report

A review of Christina Hoff Sommers’ ‘The War Against Boys’

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Evidence In Education: A Look to the Future

The education research community needs to create a supply of research findings that are of immediate relevance to workaday decision-making

College Prep for All?

Education Next talks with Cynthia G. Brown and Robert Schwartz

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Multiple Pathways Can Better Serve Students

Part of a forum on College Prep for All?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

All Students Need Common Foundational Skills

Part of a forum on College Prep for All?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Transforming Via Technology: Competition and Choice

What happens when choice is extended to cyberspace

Teacher of the Year to Union President

Lily Eskelsen García is poised to take over at the NEA

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Education Iron Triangle

An excerpt from Teachers Versus the Public

Making the Trade

Offering noncollege options to students

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Can We Get Governance Right?

How to fix public education governance in the United States is not a new question.

California’s Districts of Choice

A handful of entrepreneurial superintendents compete for students

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

How Private Schools Adapt to Vouchers: St. Patrick of Heatherdowns

This case study is drawn from “Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.”

Comparing Public Schools to Private

Lubienskis’ conclusions rely on flawed research design

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Evidence-based Debates on Teacher Quality

The world of education is moving steadily toward reliance on evidence, even with the possibility for misinterpretation.

Uncommon Success

A conversation with Brett Peiser

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Are the States Implementing Common Core?

Two experts identify implementation challenges and offer different assessments of progress thus far.

Summer 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 3

Navigating the Common Core

Complexities threaten implementation

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Common Core Takes Hold

Implementation moves steadily forward

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Bayou Backdown?

Obama administration retreats on vouchers

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

MOOCs for High School

Unlocking opportunities or substandard learning?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Rewarding and Employing Teachers Based on Their Value-Added

Paying teachers in a manner that is competitive with private sector rewards

The Curriculum Wars Live On: Two Contemporary Flash Points

An excerpt from ‘What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools’

Mayoral Control in the Windy City

Emanuel battles to improve Chicago schools

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Ballots Not Barristers

Arizona case shows limits of litigation

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Supplementing College Tuition Improves Grades of African American Students

Study finds promise of non-merit-based academic college scholarship significantly decreases school-wide suspensions in urban school district.

The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship

College funds boost grades of African American students

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Should Pell Grants Target the College-Ready?

Education Next talks with Isabel Sawhill and Sara Goldrick-Rab

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Target Aid to Students Most Likely to Succeed

The cost of college has been rising at an unsustainable rate. The federal government has tried to soften the impact of these increases on families and students by providing more assistance in the form of loans, grants, and tax credits.

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Conditional Pell Dollars Miss Students Who Need Them Most

If the goal is to increase the cost-effectiveness of the Pell Grant program rather than simply cheapening it, policymakers should refocus their sights on the real problem: we spend a lot on financial aid but spending alone is insufficient to make college truly affordable.

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Moving the Education Needle

A conversation with Scott Hamilton

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Which Student Growth Method Should Policymakers Use to Evaluate Schools?

Measuring student performance correctly helps set the right expectations for students and teachers in both high-poverty and advantaged schools.

Choosing the Right Growth Measure

Methods should compare similar schools and teachers

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

For Education Entrepreneurs, Innovation Yields High Returns

Learning from Larry Berger, Jonathan Harber, and Ron Packard

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Schooling Rebooted

Turning educators into learning engineers

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Common Core and the War on Self-Deception

Learning the truth about schools helps the school reform cause

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Poll Data Show Information on School District’s National Ranking Boosts Support for School Reform

Public supports Common Core, and when given national ranking of local schools, Americans give those schools lower grades and express greater support for vouchers, charters, and teacher tenure reform

Information Fuels Support for School Reform

Facts about local district performance alter public thinking

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Try Being a Student

An English teacher’s journey into Spanish class

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Charter Schools Survive a Biting ‘Rain of Terror’

Charter schools, once little more than glass miniatures, are proving to be the toughest, most enduring of all education reforms.

Winter 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 1

Examining High-Stakes Testing

Education Next talks with Joshua P. Starr and Margaret Spellings

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Assessments Are Vital for Healthy Schools

Putting a moratorium on testing is akin to shooting the messenger.

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

A Testing Moratorium Is Necessary

Great instruction needs great assessments

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Making Connections

A conversation with Barbara Dreyer

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Historian Ravitch Trades Fact for Fiction

Latest book indifferent to the standards of social science

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Competitive Kids

College admissions game starts early

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Mayoral Election May Threaten Progress in NYC Schools

Will academic success and public support protect charters and small high schools under a de Blasio administration?

More Graduates with High Academic Scores Now Enter Teaching

Average SAT performance of first-year teachers rose between 1993 and 2008

Gains in Teacher Quality

Academic capabilities of the U.S. teaching force are on the rise

WINTER 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 1

The Impenetrable Classroom

Mark Bauerlein reviews Larry Cuban’s “Inside the Black Box of Classroom Practice.”

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

The Softer Side of ‘No Excuses’

A view of KIPP schools in action

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Coming Soon: ‘Car-Key Kids’

What autonomous automobiles will mean for adolescence

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

The San Diego Story

A review of Tilting at Windmills: School Reform, San Diego, and America’s Race to Renew Public Education by Richard Lee Colvin

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

The Mayors’ Charter Schools

Innovation facilitates socioeconomic integration and high performance in Rhode Island

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Toddlers and Tablets

Emerging apps take cues from learning science

Winter 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 1

Will Mayor de Blasio Turn Back the School Reform Clock?

New York City’s charters and small high schools at risk

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Rising Expectations in Brazil and Chile

Reforms lift student performance but middle-class families want more

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Study Finds Louisiana Voucher Program Improves Racial Diversity in Public Schools

Contrary to allegations by the U.S. Department of Justice, the scholarship program improves racial integration in public schools in 34 districts under desegregation orders

The Louisiana Scholarship Program

Contrary to Justice Department claims, student transfers improve racial integration

WINTER 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 1

Paycheck Protection

Court upholds Michigan law forbidding public schools from collecting union dues through payroll deductions

Winter 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 1

High Scores at BASIS Charter Schools

Arizona students outperform Shanghai on international exams

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Education Next Reader Survey

Take our reader survey and tell us a little about yourself.

Field Trips to Art Museums Improve Critical Thinking, Promote Historical Empathy, and Increase Tolerance

Though school field trips to culturally enriching institutions are in decline, study finds positive educational effects; students from rural regions and minorities benefit most.

The Educational Value of Field Trips

Taking students to an art museum improves critical thinking skills, and more

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Methodological Appendix for the Crystal Bridges Experimental Study

“The Educational Value of Field Trips” Education Next, Winter 2014 Empirical Strategy Because the randomized controlled trial approach has the important feature of generating comparable treatment and control groups, we can use a straightforward set of analytic techniques, designed for use in social experiments, to estimate the impact of a school tour to an art […]

Supplemental Study: Long-Term Benefits of Field Trips to the Walton Arts Center

Supplemental Study and Methodological Appendix

Mayoral Election Could Open Door to More Charter Schools in Boston

Charter school growth in Boston is at a standstill, even though studies show strong academic results and the schools have popular support

Boston and the Charter School Cap

Politics halts growth of top-notch schools

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Underachieving in America

Researchers document international gaps, a journalist seeks the cause

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Graduations on the Rise

The 2000s saw boost in U.S. students completing high school

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

High School Graduation Rates Increase after 30 Years of Stagnation

Increased K‒8 math skills, decreased teen birth rates, and lower incarceration rates may have lifted completion rates between 2000 and 2010

Expanding College Opportunities

Intervention yields strong returns for low-income high-achievers

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Equity Trumps Excellence

Among news media, competition less important than achievement gap

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

A Majority of Public Supports Common Core, but Opposition is Growing

National survey finds declining support for increased school spending and teacher salaries; thinks schools do not do as well at attending to the needs of the less-talented as those of the more-talented.

The 2013 Education Next Survey

Americans React to Common Core and Other Education Policies

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

The Quest for Better Educators

Education Next talks with David Chard and James G. Cibulka

Strengthen State Oversight of Teacher Preparation

Forum: The Quest for Better Educators

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Training Must Focus on Content and Pedagogy

Forum: The Quest for Better Educators

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

School Choice Prompts Positive Reactions, Motivation in Traditional Public Schools

Evidence shows constructive district reactions to presence of charter schools in urban districts

Competition with Charters Motivates Districts

New political circumstances, growing popularity

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Lessons in Cyberspace

Teachers adapt what they find to what their students need

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Digital Roundup

States legislatures scramble to boost, or in some cases block, online learning

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

School Administrators Benefit the Most from Teacher Pension Plans

Beginning teachers subsidize handsome payoffs to superintendents, guardians of the public interest

The Promise of Personalized Learning

Blending the human touch with technological firepower

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

The School Administrator Payoff from Teacher Pensions

The “stewards” of the system benefit the most

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Despite Common Core, States Still Lack Common Standards

Students proficient on state tests but not national

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Despite Common Core’s Call for Increased State Standards, 26 States Lower Proficiency Bar

Authors Paul Peterson and Peter Kaplan find that even though 37 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) received a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education as incentive to join the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) consortia and raise their standards in 2009, standards still declined in rigor in 26 states and D.C. between 2009 and 2011.

Cultural Exchange

“The Immigrant Advantage: What We Can Learn from Newcomers to America about Health, Happiness, and Hope” by Claudia Kolker, as reviewed by Nathan Glazer

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

Armed With Flexibility and Control, Wisconsin School Districts Reduce Debt

2011 legislation opened opportunities for education reform and debt reduction in Wisconsin’s schools

Limits on Collective Bargaining

Wisconsin succeeds in cutting costs

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

The Quest for Rationalization

“The Allure of Order” by Jal Mehta, as reviewed by David Steiner

Fall 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 4

The Courage to Act

“Radical: Fighting to Put Students First,” by Michelle Rhee, as reviewed by Mark Bauerlein

FALL 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 4

More School Dollars!

School finance claims shuffle back to life

FALL 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 4

The School Inspector Calls

Low ratings drive improvements for schools in England

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Teach For America Keeps Forward Momentum After 24 Years

Growth is fueled by a common vision, regional independence, data-driven improvement, and pioneering alumni

What Works Clearinghouse Gives Voucher Study Highest Rating

Study Finds School Vouchers Boost College Enrollment for African Americans by 24%

Pulling the Parent Trigger

Education Next talks with Ben Austin and Michael J. Petrilli

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

The Transformational Potential of Flipped Classrooms

If 2012 was the year of MOOCs (massive open online courses) in higher education, then the flipped classroom was the innovation of the year for K–12 schools.

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Learning Optimized

A conversation with Diane Tavenner

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Charter Authorizers Face Challenges

Strong authorizing can create and support high-quality charter schools, and weak authorizing can enable lousy charter schools to open or stay open.

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

The 2013 Edu-Scholar Public Presence Rankings

The Edu-Scholar Rankings seek to recognize those university-based academics who are contributing most substantially to public debates about K–12 and higher education

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Still Teaching for America

Common vision creates forward momentum

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

“Parent Trigger” Laws Spark Debate Over Strategies for School Reform

Laws give parents more leverage for demanding school improvement, but will they result in legal battles or better schools?

Empowered Families Can Transform the System

Forum: Pulling the Parent Trigger

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

There’s a Better Way to Unlock Parent Power

Forum: Pulling the Parent Trigger

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Funding Phantom Students

State leaders too often overlook a common practice that inhibits both efficiency and productivity: funding students who do not actually attend school in funded districts.

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

School Funding Practices Keep Dollars in Districts for “Phantom Students”

Protection clauses and hold-harmless provisions discourage districts from adapting to make the best use of funds when enrollments decline

Middle Class Students Trail Peers Abroad

The America Achieves study reveals in an alternate way an international achievement gap that my colleagues and I have been identifying over the past three years.

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Teacher Preparation Programs Face More Scrutiny as Common Core Era Begins

New analysis points to the importance of training and transparent assessments of teacher preparation programs as keys to improving quality

21st-Century Teacher Education

Ed schools don’t give teachers the tools they need

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

The Impact of School Vouchers on College Enrollment

African Americans benefited the most

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Study Finds School Vouchers Boost College Enrollment for African Americans by 24%

First systematic analysis of long-term results for voucher recipients tracks 99% of students in original program.

Trial by Format

Is it ever possible to prove that all pupils have learned in a given hour what the teacher set out to teach?

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Online Teacher Education a “Disruptive Innovation” that Delivers Quality at Lower Cost

Programs open doors to teaching for talented candidates who need alternatives to campus-based model

Disrupting Teacher Education

High costs for brick-and-mortar degrees create opportunities for online programs

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

The Hazards of the Great Example

A review of Tony Wagner’s new book, Creating Innovators

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

To YouTube and Beyond

“The One World School House” by Salman Khan, as reviewed by Nathan Glazer.

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Digital Discipline

We aren’t sure if you can say that

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Do We Need a New Education Policy for Hispanics?

Debate focuses on how best to foster academic success for youth in the nation’s fastest growing immigrant group

Emphasize Civic Responsibility and Good Citizenship

Part 1 of Forum: How Can Schools Best Educate Hispanic Students?

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Focus on Higher-Order Literacy Skills

Part 2 of Forum: How Can Schools Best Educate Hispanic Students?

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

College Courses Can Use Technology To Improve Access and Reduce Costs

Experimental study shows students learn as much online as do peers in traditional courses

Action Civics

A review of No Citizen Left Behind by Meira Levinson

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

School district costs for teachers’ health insurance rose at an average annual rate of 4 percent above inflation from 2004 to 2012

Early results from Wisconsin’s Act 10 indicate promise of significant savings

It Can Be Done

A review of Born to Rise, by Deborah Kenny, and Mission Possible, by Eva Moskowitz and Arin Lavinia

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Substitute Teachers are a Large Presence in American Schools

Regular teacher absences are costly to school budgets and student learning

Revelations from the TIMSS

Half or more of student achievement gains on NAEP are an illusion

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

‘No Excuses’ Kids Go to College

Will high-flying charters see their low-income students graduate?

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

“No Excuses” Charter Schools Confront High Bar of Expectations as Graduates Enter College in Record Numbers

KIPP and others focus on factors critical to raising their students’ college-completion rates

No Substitute for a Teacher

The average child has substitute teachers for more than six months of his school career

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

How Can Schools Best Educate Hispanic Students?

Education Next talks with Nonie Lesaux and Juan Rangel

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Online Learning in Higher Education

Study finds that students enrolled in a large “hybrid” course learned as much as students in a traditional course, at substantial cost savings

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Taking Back Teaching

Educators organize to influence policy and their profession

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

New Generation of Teachers Seeks Greater Role in Education Reform

Changing demographics and ideas fuel challenges to conventional teachers union positions

Combating the ‘Culture of Can’t’

When it comes to reforming American education, school officials have far more freedom to transform, reimagine, and invigorate teaching, learning, and schooling than is widely believed.

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Coach, Collaborator, Learner

A veteran teacher leaves his own classroom to support first-year educators

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Grammarians in Hoodies

Sloppy English usage may seem like a modern problem, but the laxness that has led to this moment in grammar’s history bears a strong resemblance to the atmosphere in early-18th-century England.

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Education Activist Pursues an Ambitious Agenda

A conversation with Laura Bush

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

The Rising Cost of Teachers’ Health Care

Insurance costs for teachers are 26 percent higher than they are for private-sector professionals

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Tweet Thine Enemy

How “narrowcast” is the education policy debate?

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Desegregation Redux

Desegregation cases affecting hundreds of districts haven’t been concluded.

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Questioning the Quality of Virtual Schools

NEPC report uses flawed measures

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Widely Publicized Critique of Virtual Schools Seriously Flawed

Evidence used in report on K12 Inc. presents misleading information about how much students learn

SPRING 2013/ VOL. 13, NO. 2

School Leaders Matter

Measuring the impact of effective principals

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Can Digital Learning Transform Education?

Education Next talks with Chester E. Finn, Jr., and Michael B. Horn

A Double Dose of Algebra

Intensive math instruction has long-term benefits

WINTER 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Reform Agenda Gains Strength

The 2012 EdNext-PEPG survey finds Hispanics give schools a higher grade than others do

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Schools and the City

Young professionals are moving to the city and sticking around to raise families. Are urban school districts ready for them?

Solving America’s Math Problem

Tailor instruction to the varying needs of the students

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Belmont and Fishtown Part Ways

A review of Charles Murray’s Coming Apart

WINTER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 1

The Elephant in the Classroom

Why is diversity so hard to manage?

WINTER 2013 / VOL. 13, No. 1

Diverse Charter Schools

Popular, controversial, and a challenge to run successfully

WINTER 2013 / VOL. 13, No. 1

Setting Students Up for Success

Create the path of least resistance

WINTER 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Increasing Instructional Time for Algebra Boosts Student Performance and Graduation Rates

Taking two periods of Algebra in 9th grade has long-run positive effects on lower-achieving students

WINTER 2013 \ Vol. 13, No. 1

Exam Schools from the Inside

Racially diverse, subject to collective bargaining, fulfilling a need

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Study Quantifies Individual Principals’ Contributions to Student Achievement Growth

A new study has found that highly effective principals raise the achievement of a typical student in their schools by between 0.05 and 0.21 standard deviations.

First, We Need a Brand New K–12 System

Part 1 of a forum on whether digital learning can transform education

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

As Digital Learning Draws New Users, Transformation Will Occur

Part 2 of a forum on whether digital learning can transform education

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Digital Learning Sparks Debate over the Pace of Change Needed in American Schools

The potential for digital learning to boost student achievement seems boundless, but will the long-established organization of schooling embrace or hinder it?

Newark’s Superintendent Rolls Up Her Sleeves and Gets to Work

A conversation with Cami Anderson

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Capturing the Dimensions of Effective Teaching

Student achievement gains, student surveys, and classroom observations

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

School Choice Marches Forward

2011 a year of new laws and new lawsuits

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

School Choice Expands in Variety and Scope, Despite Tumultuous Legal Landscape

Thirteen states enacted new K-12 school choice programs in 2011 and more than two dozen states are considering similar bills

A River of Data

Making the learning experience more effective

WINTER 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Can Teacher Evaluation Improve Teaching?

Evidence of systematic growth in the effectiveness of midcareer teachers

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Can Carrots Become Sticks?

Court knows coercion when it sees it

WINTER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 1

A Takeover Tale

A review of the new movie “Won’t Back Down”

Winter 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 1

Primer on Success

A Review of Paul Tough’s How Children Succeed

Winter 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 1

New Survey Shows Majority of Independent Voters Favor Charter Schools, feel Unions do 'More Harm than Good'

Overall, public says teacher salaries and tenure should be based heavily on student test performance; public has less confidence in teachers than previously reported

Game Changer

Might it be “social learning”?

Fall 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 4

Is the U.S. Catching Up?

International and state trends in student achievement

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

A New Type of Ed School

Linking candidate success to student success

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

The Compensation Question

Are public school teachers underpaid?

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Culture Clash

Is American education racist?

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Florida Defeats the Skeptics

Test scores show genuine progress in the Sunshine State

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Review of Florida Test Scores Confirms Substantial Gains over Past Decade

After the end of social promotion in 3rd grade, Florida shown to have boosted student performance

Teacher Evaluations Found to Improve Midcareer Effectiveness

When teachers in Cincinnati were evaluated rigorously, student performance on math tests improve

Worms for Dinner

Travel offers cultural enrichment for teachers

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

New Report Identifies 165 Public High Schools That Admit Students Based on Top Academic Records

Schools disproportionately serve Asians and African Americans; Whites and Latinos underrepresented

Public Schools and Money

Strategies for improving productivity in times of austerity

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Public Schools still have more money and employees per pupil than they did in 2000, but are now feeling a financial squeeze

Bold action is needed to protect students without raising costs

Running in Place

Americans are learning more but are not catching up to the rest of the world

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12. NO. 4

Student Achievement Gains in U.S. Fail to Close International Achievement Gap

U.S. ranks 25th out of 49 countries in student test-score gains over 14-year period, report 3 scholars at Harvard, Stanford and the University of Munich

States and Cities Taking Steps to End the District Monopoly on Public School Facilities

Movement growth prompts districts to accommodate charter needs – but bigger structural changes are needed

Grading the President

With Race to the Top, Obama earns a B+ in ed reform

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Not All Teachers Are Made of Ticky-Tacky, Teaching Just the Same

The true import of the Chetty study

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Teaching the Teachers

Achievement Network offers support for data-driven instruction

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

School Start Times Found to Affect Student Achievement

North Carolina study suggests a one-hour later start time in middle school would reduce achievement gaps

Researchers Report Findings Showing Lasting Impacts of Effective Teachers

Teachers who raise test scores have long-term effects on students’ college enrollment and earnings as adults

Fight Club

Are advocacy organizations changing the politics of education?

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Great Teaching

Measuring its effects on students’ future earnings

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Advice for Education Reformers: Be Bold!

A conversation with Jeb Bush

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Whose School Buildings Are They, Anyway?

Making public school facilities available to charters

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Title IX at Trial

If you schedule it, will they come?

FALL 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 4

Door Still Closed

Alabama plaintiffs lose federal school finance challenge

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

When Education Reform Gets Personal

Confessions of a policy-wonk father

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Do Schools Begin Too Early?

The effect of start times on student achievement

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Best Practices Are the Worst

Picking the anecdotes you want to believe: A book review of Marc Tucker’s “Surpassing Shanghai”

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Low Family Income Not a Major Reason For Poor Student Achievement

Although income and achievement are correlated, the Broader, Bolder Approach to school reform errs in ignoring other, more important factors

Policy Obstacles Stall, But Do Not Stop, Progress of Charter Schools in South Carolina

Lessons from past 15 years show difficult political and financial path charter schools face

Special Choices

Do voucher schools serve students with disabilities?

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Milwaukee School Voucher Program has more Students with Disabilities than Previously Reported

Study shows that 7 to 14 percent of voucher students have disabilities, as compared to 2 percent estimate by Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Students who attend middle schools at risk of dropping out of high school

As compared to students in K-8 elementary schools, middle school students also score lower on achievement tests. Losses amount to as much as 3.5 to 7 months of learning

Moynihan Redux

Sadly, still more single-parent families. A review of Mitch Pearlstein’s “Shortchanging Student Achievement: The Educational, Economic, and Social Costs of Family Fragmentation”

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Michigan’s Chartering Strategy

Choice and competition are good for authorizers, too

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

The Common Core Math Standards

Are they a step forward or backward?

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

The Battle Over Common Core Math Standards: Will A Larger Federal Role Help or Hinder Curriculum Improvement?

Standards raise the bar in many, but not all, states, and still do not reach the highest international level

Neither Broad Nor Bold

A narrow-minded approach to school reform

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

The Newsroom’s View of Education Reform

Surprise! The press paints a distorted picture

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

Hyper Hype

Will digital learning be killed by kindness?

SUMMER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 3

The Middle School Plunge

Achievement tumbles when young students change schools

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Edunomics

For better teachers, change the incentives

Spring 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 2

More Facts, Fewer Hopes

Evidence fails to sway in testing policies

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Great Teachers in the Classroom?

It depends on raising the competence of a workforce of millions

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Obama’s Education Record

Does the reality match the rhetoric?

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Does School Choice Reduce Crime?

Evidence from North Carolina

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

School Choice Program Found to Reduce Crime and its Related Social Cost Among High-Risk Youth

High-risk middle- and high-school students who transfer to their preferred school are less likely to be arrested and spend less time incarcerated, pointing to impact of school choice

Experts Envision New Federal Role Advancing Equity and Choice in Education

NCLB reauthorization offers possibility for federal redirection, if it focuses on providing parents more accurate information and greater choice rather than requiring top-down compliance

Cheating the Charters

Political and financial lessons from South Carolina

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Putting the Schools in Charge

An entrepreneur’s vision for a more responsive education system

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Can Khan Move the Bell Curve to the Right?

Math instruction goes viral

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Mickey Mouse Strikes Back

Voucher wars heat up in Colorado

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Top 20 Blog Entries of 2011!

A rundown of the top posts on the Education Next blog in 2011

Let the Dollars Follow the Child

How the federal government can achieve equity

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Taking on New Jersey

A conversation with Chris Cerf

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

For Digital Learning, the Devil’s in the Details

State planning is key to progress

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Top Education Next Articles of 2011!

A rundown of the most read Education Next articles of the past year

The Accountability Plateau

In Texas and across the nation, high-stakes testing regimes produced real gains for a few years, then flat-lined

December 15, 2011

Obama’s NCLB Waivers: Are they necessary or illegal?

Education Next talks with Martha Derthick and Andy Rotherham

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Budget Buster

Teachers sue to protect pensions

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Unions and the Public Interest

Is collective bargaining for teachers good for students?

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Grinding the Antitesting Ax

More bias than evidence behind NRC panel’s conclusions

SPRING 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Achievement Gains under No Child Left Behind Test-Based Accountability Projected To Yield Large, Long-Term Economic Returns

Fact-checking analysis of recent National Research Council report shows that seemingly modest gains are significant

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Green Dot Takeover

The Locke school story leaves questions unanswered

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Obama Administration’s Conditional Waivers from No Child Left Behind Provisions Spark New Legal, Policy, and Constitutional Debate

Are waivers that require states to accept “principles” necessary or do they constitute rewriting law?

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 2

Academic Value of Non-Academics

The case for keeping extracurriculars

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

“Hedge-Fund Guy” Emails Support to School Reformers

A conversation with Whitney Tilson

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

When the Best is Mediocre

Developed countries far outperform our most affluent suburbs

View the Global Report Card
View the Methodological Appendix

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

A Different Role for Teachers Unions

Cooperation brings high scores in Canada and Finland

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

The International Experience

What U.S. schools can and cannot learn from other countries

Photos: Additional images from the Education Next-PEPG Conference

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Seeing the Forest Instead of the Trees

Nuance needed when studying teachers unions

Winter 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Practical Research for Teachers is in Short Supply

Need for Research on Effective Choices That Work in the Classroom

Studying Teacher Moves

A practitioner’s take on what is blocking the research teachers need

WINTER 2012 / VOL. 12, NO. 1

Advocacy Groups Empower Parents to Act as Catalysts for School Reform

A growing number of nonprofit organizations bypass PTAs to force change in public education

NOT Your Mother’s PTA

Advocacy groups raise money, voices, hopes

Photos: Additional images of school advocacy groups

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

Study Finds Gifted and Talented Programs in Middle-Schools Have Little Impact on Math and Reading Achievement

However, science scores improve from attending a gifted and talented magnet program

Poor Results for High Achievers

New evidence on the impact of gifted and talented programs

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

Shortchanging Extracurriculars Might be Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish

Student involvement in sports, arts, and civic activities linked to higher academic achievement and persistence

The Flipped Classroom

Online instruction at home frees class time for learning

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

Study Shows That Wealthy Suburban School Districts Are Only Mediocre by International Standards

Sixty-eight percent of all U.S. districts have average math achievement below the 50th percentile when compared to achievement in 25 developed nations

Low Expectations

An insider’s view of ed schools

Winter 2012 / Vol. 12, No. 1

The New Superintendent of Schools for New Orleans

A conversation with John White

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Trouble in Kansas

Parents in a wealthy district sue to pay more taxes

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Florida Reformers Got It Right

Hybrid schoolers reap the benefits

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

U.S. Proficiency in Math and Reading Lags Behind That of Most Industrialized Nations, Endangering Long Term Economic Growth

Harvard Study shows large variation in each state’s international standing in math and reading achievement

Are U.S. Students Ready to Compete?

 
The latest on each state’s international standing

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Fixing Teacher Pensions

Is it enough to adjust existing plans?

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Behind the Headline: States Fail to Raise Bar in Reading, Math Tests

On Top of the News States Fail to Raise Bar in Reading, Math Tests Wall Street Journal | 8/11/11 Behind the Headline Few States Set World-Class Standards Education Next | Summer 2008 A new NCES report finds that, while some states have raised their standards for proficiency in math and reading, most states still fall […]

Performance Learning Centers Give At-Risk Students New Chances to Succeed

Combining online learning and teacher coaching, PLCs enable students to learn at their own pace and earn their diplomas

Getting At-Risk Teens to Graduation

Blended learning offers a second chance

Photos: Additional images of Performance Learning Centers (PLCs) in Hampton and Richmond, Virginia.

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Public and Teachers Increasingly Divided on Key Education Issues

National Survey shows increased support for vouchers, but public’s views on merit pay, charters, and other policies have not changed, though teacher opposition to reforms intensifies

The Public Weighs In on School Reform

Intense controversies do not alter public thinking, but teachers differ more sharply than ever

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

The 2011 Education Next-PEPG Survey

Complete Results

The 2012 Republican Candidates (So Far)

What they’ve said and done on education in the past, and what they might do about our public schools if elected

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Republican Governors Running on Strong Education Records as Candidates for President

Romney and Pawlenty earn high marks for student achievement, Perry can spotlight Hispanic performance

Chicago Study Shows Principals Focus on Retaining Highly Effective Teachers in Dismissal Decisions – if Policies Permit

Reform improves student achievement by providing principals with the tools to manage the quality of personnel in their classrooms

Principled Principals

New evidence from Chicago shows they fire the least effective teachers

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Charter School Forges Ahead with Expansion

On Top of the News Charter School Forges Ahead with Expansion Wall Street Journal | 7/14/11 Behind the Headline Future Schools Education Next | Summer 2011 Rocketship Education hopes to open 20 additional hybrid schools in California by 2017, a plan opposed by the local union and school district. The charter organization, which already runs […]

Success is in the Details at High-Performing Charter Management Organizations

A “no excuses” approach to teaching and learning and tight management make the difference

Unlocking the Secrets of High-Performing Charters

Tight management and “no excuses”

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Don’t Ditch Testing After Atlanta Cheating, Boost Test Security

On Top of the News Don’t Ditch Testing After Atlanta Cheating, Boost Test Security CNN.com | 07/13/11 Behind the Headline Cheating to the Test Education Next | Spring 2001 Cheating should not lead us to abandon assessments, writes Chester Finn on CNN.com. Instead, listen to testing expert Greg Cizek, who participated in the investigation of […]

Managing the Teacher Workforce

The consequences of “last in, first out” personnel policies

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Seniority Rules Lead Districts to Increase Teacher Layoffs and Undermine Teaching Quality

“Last in, first out” reduction-in-force policies give greater weight to teacher longevity than effectiveness

All A-Twitter about Education

Improving our schools in 140 characters or less

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Cautionary Tale

Review of Schoolhouse of Cards by Eugene Hickok and Collision Course by Paul Manna

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Behind the Headline: D.C. School Ratings Up Among System Parents, But Doubts Remain

On Top of the News D. C. School Ratings Up Among System Parents, but Doubts Remain Washington Post | 06/22/11 Behind the Headline Mismatch Education Next | Fall 2011 According to a new survey by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation, former D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee is viewed more favorably now than […]

Mismatch

Review of The Bee Eater by Richard Whitmire

Fall 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 4

Behind the Headline: The German Example

On Top of the News The German Example The New York Times | 06/08/11 Behind the Headline Teaching Math to the Talented Education Next | Winter 2011 On the occasion of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s visit to the White House, the New York Times’ David Leonhardt writes about what Germany is getting right these days, […]

Behind the Headline – World-beating: A weird school measure

On Top of the News World-beating: A weird school measure Class Struggle (blog) | 06/07/11 Behind the Headline The NRC Judges Test-Based Accountability Education Next (blog) | 06/03/11 Jay Mathews critiques the new NRC report on test-based accountability, arguing that the NRC has an unreasonable standard for evaluating the reform strategy. Jay’s column quotes Rick […]

Behind the Headline: Pa. girl wins Bee with ‘cymotrichous’

On Top of the News Pa. girl wins Bee with ‘cymotrichous’ USA Today | 06/03/11 Behind the Headline Competition Makes a Comeback Education Next | Summer 2010 The 84th Scripps National Spelling Bee has a winner! June Kronholz wrote about spelling bees and other academic competitions in the Summer 2010 issue of Ed Next. Also […]

Behind the Headline: GOP questions federal rules on healthier eating

On Top of the News GOP questions federal rules on healthier eating U.S. News & World Report | 05/31/11 Behind the Headline The School Lunch Lobby Education Next | Summer 2005 Republicans in Congress are fighting the Obama administration over new rules that would require healthier school lunches. An article by Ron Haskins that appeared […]

Virtual Schoolteacher

Online education works for teachers and students

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Teachers Swap Recipes

Educators use web sites and social networks to share lesson plans

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Diagnosing Education Reform

Review of The Same Thing Over and Over by Frederick M. Hess

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Whatever Happened to Integration?

Review of Five Miles Away, A World Apart by James E. Ryan

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Sage on the Stage

Is lecturing really all that bad?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Future Schools

Blending face-to-face and online learning

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Creating a Corps of Change Agents

What explains the success of Teach For America?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Through Dual Enrollment, High School Students Get an Early Start on College and Careers

Students have the chance to accelerate and gain workforce skills, but roadblocks to dual enrollment remain

High Schoolers in College

Dual enrollment programs offer something for everyone

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Thou Shalt Not Say Jesus

Do elementary school students have free-speech rights?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Are We Lifting All Boats or Only Some?

Equity versus excellence and the talented tenth

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Study Finds Rigorous Classroom Observations Can Identify Effective Teachers

Cincinnati’s teacher evaluation system pinpoints link between teaching practices and student achievement

Evaluating Teacher Effectiveness

Can classroom observations identify practices that raise achievement?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Harvard Study Shows that Lecture-Style Presentations Lead to Higher Student Achievement

Widely-used problem-solving pedagogy as implemented in practice is not as effective for raising achievement levels

Eighth-Grade Students Learn More Through Direct Instruction

Students learned 3.6 percent of a standard deviation more if the teacher spent 10 percent more time on direct instruction. That’s one to two months of extra learning during the course of the year.

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Valuing Teachers

How much is a good teacher worth?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Assessing New York’s Commissioner of Education

With Steiner’s sudden resignation, will the state continue its Race to the Top?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Assessing David Steiner’s Short Reign as New York State’s Education Commissioner

The state won the Race to the Top but his resignation leaves doubts that there will be any will to fulfill its promises

Behind the Headline: Holes in the case against Michelle Rhee

On Top of the News Holes in the case against Michelle Rhee The Washington Times | 04/11/11 Behind the Headline The Case Against Michelle Rhee Education Next | Summer 2011 In the Washington Times, Paul Peterson scrutinizes two recent studies of student achievement in the District of Columbia, and concludes that “the case against Michelle […]

Michelle Rhee’s DC Record Survives Scrutiny

The case against Rhee evaporates in fact-checking analysis of two critiques of her record

The Case Against Michelle Rhee

How persuasive is it?

Summer 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 3

Higher Teacher Quality Would Catapult U.S. Toward Economic Growth

Analysis examines direct link between teacher effectiveness and lifetime earnings

Behind the Headline: House passes Boehner’s school vouchers bill

On Top of the News House passes Boehner’s school vouchers bill USA Today | 03/30/11 Behind the Headline Lost Opportunities Education Next | Fall 2009 On Wednesday, the House passed a bill that would revive the school voucher program for students in Washington, D.C. Patrick Wolf, the principal investigator of the evaluation of the D.C. […]

Behind the Headline: L.A. elementary schools to switch reading programs

The Los Angeles school board has dumped Open Court, a reading program for elementary school students which provided scripted, phonics-intensive lessons. Many teachers hated the program, the L.A. Times reports. In the Winter 2007 issue of Ed Next, Diane Ravitch traced the history of the Open Court readers.

Behind the Headline: Virginia Gov. Robert Mc­Don­nell vetoes P.E. bill

Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell vetoed a bill that would have required elementary and middle school students to participate in at least 150 minutes of physical education each week. A study that was published in Ed Next in 2006 found that mandating more time in PE classes does not always result in more exercise for kids.

Schools of the Future Taking Shape through Blended Learning Innovations

Charter models that integrate teacher-directed and digital learning are on the leading edge of school reform

EdNext Book Club

In-depth interviews by Mike Petrilli with authors of new and classic books about education.

Behind the Headline: Detroit Plan Makes Big Charter School Bet

In a bid to prevent massive school closings, Detroit will consider converting nearly a third of its district-run schools into charter schools. In an article that appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Ed Next, Andy Smarick urged charter school advocates to embrace a strategy of large-scale replacement of failing district schools with charter schools.

Behind the Headline: Cuts to Head Start Show Challenge of Fiscal Restraint

Republicans are pushing to cut the budget for Head Start by $2 billion. The program is popular, but studies have raised questions about its effectiveness. The current budget for the program is $7.2 billion. An article by Ron Haskins that appeared in the Winter 2004 issue of Ed Next looked at earlier efforts to reform Head Start.

Behind the Headline: Gates Says Benefits Costs Hit Schools

Bill Gates will outline how flawed pension accounting hampers the ability of states to pay for education, and will call for states to rethink their pension systems, in a talk to be presented at the TED conference tomorrow. Gates has created a website that shows the funding status for pension obligations and retiree health-care benefits for each state. In the Spring 2009 issue of Ed Next, Mike Podgursky and Bob Costrell wrote about the high cost of teacher pensions.

Spring 2011 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Cell Phones Are Ringing

Will educators answer?

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Catholic Ethos, Public Education

How the Christian Brothers came to start two charter schools in Chicago

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

In the United States, Merit Pay Plans for Teachers are Few and Far Between

Even when implemented, the plans are more likely to be symbolic than substantive

Blocked, Diluted, and Co-opted

Interest groups wage war against merit pay

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Post-Katrina Reforms Produce Achievement Gains and Conflict in New Orleans Schools

New school models and governing arrangements at pivotal point as New Orleans looks ahead

New Schools in New Orleans

School reform both exhilarated and imperiled by success

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Tools for Teachers

Review of Doug Lemov’s Teach Like a Champion

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Teach for America Alumni Overrepresented in Entrepreneurial Ventures

Leaders of education organizations often have TFA experience

Countries with Merit Pay Score Highest on International Tests

Significantly better student achievement seen in countries that make use of teacher performance pay

Merit Pay International

Countries with performance pay for teachers score higher on PISA tests

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Behind the Headline: Full-Time E-Learning Not Seen as Viable Option for Many

In Ed Week, Michelle Davis describes what the school day is like for parents whose children attend virtual school full-time. (Hint: it’s a lot of work!) In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Bill Tucker wrote about Florida Virtual School, which offers supplemental courses to students attending brick-and-mortar schools but also allows students to enroll in an online school full-time.

The Ninth Circuit v. Reality

Highly qualified teachers don’t grow on trees

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Does Whole-School Performance Pay Improve Student Learning?

Evidence from the New York City schools

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Study provides evidence that the New York City bonus program did not lead to marked gains in student achievement

New York City’s decision to scrap school-wide bonus pay echoes study findings that school-wide performance pay hampers the incentives for individual teachers to improve performance

Taking Stock of a Decade of Reform

School reformers have made forward strides in the last ten years, and public debate has acquired a bipartisan cast. But just how successful have reform efforts been?

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

A Battle Begun, Not Won

The following essay is part of a forum, written in honor of Education Next’s 10th anniversary, in which the editors assessed the school reform movement’s victories and challenges to see just how successful reform efforts have been. For the other side of the debate, please see Pyrrhic Victories? by Frederick M. Hess, Michael J. Petrilli, […]

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Pyrrhic Victories?

The following essay is part of a forum, written in honor of Education Next’s 10th anniversary, in which the editors assessed the school reform movement’s victories and challenges to see just how successful reform efforts have been. For the other side of the debate, please see A Battle Begun, Not Won by Paul E. Peterson, […]

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Happy 10th Anniversary, Education Next!

Over the decade, we have witnessed—perhaps contributed to—the advance of school reform.

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Behind the Headline: Whittle Starts A City School

Edison Schools co-founder Chris Whittle has announced that he will open a for-profit, elite private school in New York City in September 2012. A study by Matt Chingos and Paul Peterson that was published in Ed Next in 2009 looked at what happened when for-profit firms, including Edison Schools, were given control of some public schools in Philadelphia.

Lessons for Online Learning

Charter schools’ successes and mistakes have a lot to teach virtual educators

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Behind the Headline: GWU launches online prep school

In partnership with K12.com, George Washington University has launched a high school that will operate entirely online. In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Bill Tucker wrote about Florida Virtual School, which offers supplemental courses to students attending brick-and-mortar schools but also allows students to enroll in an online school full-time.

Behind the Headline: Can Rhee’s reforms work without Rhee’s toughness?

In the Washington Post this weekend, Richard Whitmire worries that the race to embrace a style of school reform he calls “Michelle Light” — the kinds of teacher quality reforms identified with Michelle Rhee, but pursued in a gentle, cooperative way–may not be able to accomplish much. Rhee was profiled by June Kronholz in the Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next.

The Truly Talented Soar in Public School Targeting Their Needs

Students with exceptional intellectual ability are well served in an innovative Nevada public school

Challenging the Gifted

Nuclear chemistry and Sartre draw the best and brightest to Reno

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Lights, Camera, Action!

Using video recordings to evaluate teachers

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Behind the Headline: Why Teacher Pensions Don’t Work

In the Wall Street Journal, Joel Klein argues that the structure of traditional pensions discourages talented young people from becoming teachers. The Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next included a study by Bob Costrell and Mike Podgursky that showed how teacher pensions concentrate benefits on teachers who spend their entire careers in a single state, penalizing younger teachers, who change jobs and move more often than did previous generations.

Poll: Predictions for 2011

What will 2011 bring to the world of education reform? Vote now for the two developments you think are most and least likely

The Education Reform Book Is Dead

Long live education reform

Spring 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 2

Behind the Headline – Detroit Public Schools: 40,000 kids to get laptops from stimulus funds

Detroit Public Schools will spend $49 million in federal stimulus funds to buy laptops for 40,000 students in grades 6-12.  In the Fall 2004 issue of Ed Next, Rick Hess wrote about other attempts by states and districts to boost achievement by passing out laptops. ” The tendency,” he noted, “has been to sprinkle computers and Internet connections across classrooms in the pleasant hope that teachers will integrate them into their lessons.”

Poll: Best and Worst Developments for K-12 Education

New Ed Next Readers Poll: Vote now on the best and worst events in 2010 for education.

Diplomatic Mission

President Obama’s path to performance pay

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Winter 2011 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

All Together Now?

Educating high and low achievers in the same classroom

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Tax Credit Scholarships for Low-Income Florida Students to Attend Private Schools Improve Performance at Nearby Public Schools

Private school scholarship program leads to immediate and pronounced achievement improvements at neighborhood public schools, with elementary and middle schools most responsive

Does Competition Improve Public Schools?

New evidence from the Florida tax-credit scholarship program

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Texas Tackles the Data Problem

New system will give teachers information they can use

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Wasting Talent

Everyone’s local school needs to do better

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

The Middle School Mess

If you love bungee jumping, you’re the middle school type

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Percentage of U.S. Students Achieving at Advanced Levels in Math Trails Most Industrialized Nations

New analysis finds U.S. ranked 31st out of 56 countries in the percentage of students performing at a high level of accomplishment, trailing Korea, Canada, the Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Poland and Lithuania, among others

Teaching Math to the Talented

Which countries—and states—are producing high-achieving students?

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Educational Providence

New York courts close one door, federal money opens another

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Truants

The challenges of keeping kids in school

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Behind the Headline: Tough as Nails, but Always Ready for a Bearhug

At De La Salle Academy, a private school in New York City for high-performing low-income children profiled in today’s New York Times, rules are strict and expectations are high, but the school becomes like a family for students. An article by David Whitman that appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Ed Next explored the phenomenon of paternalistic schools, “highly prescriptive institutions that teach students not just how to think, but also how to act according to what are commonly termed traditional, middle-class values.”

The $500 million Question

Can charter management organizations deliver quality education at scale?

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Behind the Headline: Blending Computers Into Classrooms

Barbara Martinez of the Wall Street Journal visits a Bronx elementary school where students spend two hours per day engaged in computer-directed instruction.  In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Gerald Huff and Bror Saxberg imagined what computer-assisted learning might look like in 2025 and described some ways that technology is being used to customize learning today.

Data-Driven and Off Course

An English teacher’s view

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

How Schools Spend Their Money

Review of Marguerite Roza’s Educational Economics

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Behind the Headline: Chicago Public Schools CEO Ron Huberman to step down

Ron Huberman, who was appointed Chicago Schools CEO by Mayor Richard Daley after Arne Duncan became Secretary of Education, has told Mayor Daley that he will leave his position before the mayor leaves office in May rather than serve under another mayor, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. In the Winter 2003 issue of Ed Next, Alexander Russo wrote about the early days of mayoral control of education in Chicago.

Behind the Headline: KIPP leaders unworried by test score drop

Fifth grade test scores are down at KIPP schools in Washington, DC, but KIPP leaders are not concerned, and the network is continuing to add schools and grade levels, reports Jay Mathews. In Spring 2009, Ed Next published an excerpt from Jay’s book about KIPP, Work Hard. Be Nice.

E Pluribus Plures

Review of Jeffrey E. Mirel’s Patriotic Pluralism

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

Behind the Headline: Making Math Lessons as Easy as 1, Pause, 2, Pause …

Winnie Hu writes in the New York Times about school districts adopting Singapore Math, which is thought to provide a better foundation for higher-order math skills by teaching fewer topics but in more depth. Barry Garelick investigated Singapore Math in the Fall 2006 issue of Ed Next.

We Know Our Schools

All school evaluations, like all politics, are local

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Fall 2010 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

2+2=Litigation

New front opens in the math wars

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Study Finds Students in K-8 Schools Do Better than Students in Stand-Alone Middle Schools

Comprehensive analysis of 10 years of data from New York City shows middle-school students experience substantial achievement decline compared to K-8 peers

Stuck in the Middle

How and why middle schools harm student achievement

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Ed Next Poll: Top Books of the Decade

Please vote for the top three books of the decade.

Behind the Headline: Hurricane Katrina swept away years of dysfunction in New Orleans public schools

Five years after Hurricane Katrina hit, Cindy Chang of the New Orleans Times Picayune describes the transformation that has taken place in the city’s school system. In the Fall 2006 issue of Ed Next, Kathryn Newmark and Veronique de Rugy wrote about the changes that were underway.

Lessons from a Reformer

Review of Larry Cuban’s As Good As It Gets

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Public and Teachers Divided in Their Support for Merit Pay, Teacher Tenure, Race to the Top

National Survey also reveals increased support for virtual schooling, support for charter schools rises sharply in minority communities

Meeting of the Minds

The 2010 EdNext-PEPG Survey shows that, on many education reform issues, Democrats and Republicans hardly disagree

Winter 2011 / Vol. 11, No. 1

The 2010 Education Next-PEPG Survey

Complete Results

Behind the Headline: Unions Lose Election Bid

In New York, a judge has rejected a demand by the teachers union that the union be allowed to spend significantly more money on a Senate race than is permitted under the state’s current campaign finance law. In an article that appears in the Fall 2010 issue of Ed Next, Mike Antonucci took a close look at campaign spending by teachers unions.

Behind the Headline: Unions’ Tactics Diverge in Engaging Obama Agenda

In Ed Week, Stephen Sawchuk looks at how the NEA and the AFT are responding to the reforms being advanced by the Obama administration, and at what might explain the different responses from the two unions. In the Winter 2009 issue of Ed Next, Linda Seebach wrote about the two teachers unions, which had just chosen new presidents at their national conventions.

Advocating for Arts in the Classroom

Academic discipline or instrument of personal change?

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Who’s teaching L.A.’s kids?

The Los Angeles Times has obtained seven years worth of test scores for individual students and used them to calculate “value added” scores for over 6,000 teachers. The teachers will be identified by name (and scores) in a series of articles and a database that will be made public. Kati Haycock and Eric Hanushek discussed the importance of identifying ineffective teachers in a forum that appeared in the Summer 2010 issue of Ed Next about strategies for increasing the number of effective teachers in high-poverty schools.

Behind the Headline: E Is for Fail

In Slate, Brian Palmer looks at the history of letter grades for an explanation of why schools assign grades of A,B,C,D, and F—but not E. A study by David Figlio and Maurice Lucas that was published in Ed Next in 2004 found that elementary school students learn more from teachers who are tough graders.

Harvard Study Finds That Parents Grade Their Local Schools on Basis of Student Achievement Not Racial Composition of School

Analysis also debunks popular belief that low-income, minority and less-educated parents are not as informed about school quality

Grading Schools

Can citizens tell a good school when they see one?

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

School on the Inside

Teaching the incarcerated student

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Venture Philanthropy gives $5.5 million for expansion of KIPP DC charter schools

A $5.5 million gift will allow KIPP to more than double the number of students enrolled in its schools in DC (to 3400 students) by 2015. In an article that appeared in Ed Next in 2008, Julie Bennett explored how KIPP has been able to expand while maintaining quality.

Behind the Headline: A food bill we need

First Lady Michelle Obama urges Congress to pass the Child Nutrition Bill, which would bring healthier school lunches to more kids. In an article that appeared in Ed Next in 2005, Ron Haskins wrote about the forces behind the federal school lunch program.

Behind the Headline: Least-Disruptive Turnaround Model Proving Popular

School districts attempting to turn around low-performing schools using federal funds are overwhelming choosing the least disruptive interventions. An article by Andy Smarick that appeared in the Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next argued that turnaround efforts like these are unlikely to succeed.

Behind the Headline: Standards Raised, More Students Fail Tests

Passing rates on state tests plummeted this year in New York after state education officials raised the cut score on the state’s reading and math tests. New York said that the tests had become significantly easier to pass.  A study by Paul Peterson and Carlos Xabel Lastra-Anadón that will appear in the Fall 2010 issue of Ed Next finds that New York is not the only state that had been dumbing down its tests.

Is Desegregation Dead?

Parsing the relationship between achievement and demographics

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Toothless Reform?

If the feds get tough, Race to the Top might work

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Behind the Headline: Rhee aims to build voucher programs

In Washington, schools chancellor Michelle Rhee is considering a plan that would offer vouchers to special ed students in need of full-time placements. Jay Greene and Stuart Buck explained how special ed vouchers work and dispelled myths about the vouchers in an article appearing in the Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next.

Luck of the Draw

Review of The Lottery (2010), Directed by Madeleine Sackler

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: The Case Against Summer Vacation

Summer learning loss is among the most pernicious — if least acknowledged — causes of achievement gaps in America’s schools, notes David von Drehle in this week’s Time Magazine, and lengthening the school year is the answer. In an article published in the Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next, Dave Marcotte and Ben Hansen reviewed the research on the impact of extending the school year on student achievement.

Behind the Headline: ‘Common Core’ standards clearer, more rigorous

The Fordham Institute has released an analysis of the Common Core standards and the state academic standards in all 50 states which finds that the Common Core standards are better than those in three quarters of the states. In an article that appeared in Ed Next in 2009, Chester Finn and Deborah Meier debated the merits of a national curriculum.

Invisible Ink in Teacher Contracts

State policy trumps collective bargaining

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Rare attack on Harlem Children’s Zone

A new Brookings study by Russ Whitehurst and Michelle Croft finds that students attending the charter school connected with the Harlem Children’s Zone do not outperform students at other New York City charter schools, but Jay Mathews warns that it is too soon to draw conclusions about the impact of the HCZ’s services. Cara Spitalewitz reviewed Paul Tough’s book about the Harlem Children’s Zone in the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next.

Behind the Headline: Changes urged for Mass. schools

In Massachusetts, the commissioner of education is recommending that the state replace its highly regarded academic standards with the Common Core Standards. In an article that appeared in Ed Next last year, Charles Chieppo and Jamie Gass worried that Massachusetts might turn its back on the nation’s most successful reform strategy, including its high academic standards.

Behind the Headline: New Evaluation Laws Split Teachers Even More

In Colorado and other states, teachers’ job security will now be tied to how well their students perform on state tests. In an article appearing in the Summer 2010 issue of Ed Next, Rick Hanushek and Kati Haycock debate the best ways to get more effective teachers into high-need schools. They both note that removing poorly performing teachers is an important part of any strategy to boost teacher quality.

School Reform Hits the Big Screen

Why 2010 is a banner year for the education documentary

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

The Long Reach of Teachers Unions

Using money to win friends and influence policy

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Teachers Unions In Five States Spent More Than $100 Per Teacher On Political Campaigns

New Education Next analysis finds two national teachers unions spent $71.7 million on political campaigns in 2007-08 and millions more on policy research to support their agendas

Behind the Headline: NJ teacher drain

In New Jersey, a flood of teachers are retiring this month in response to a proposal to reduce pension benefits for future retirees. In an article that appeared in Ed Next in 2008, Bob Costrell and Mike Podgursky investigated the peculiar incentives that are built into teacher pensions, incentives which can encourage teachers to leave teaching when they are still effective or to remain in their jobs when they have burned out.

Authorizing Charters

Helping mom-and-pops in Ohio

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: How Many Graduates Does It Take to Be No. 1?

On Top of the News How Many Graduates Does It Take to Be No. 1? 06/26/10 | New York Times Behind the Headline Competition Makes a Comeback Summer 2010 | Education Next Many high schools are naming multiple students–sometimes dozens–as valedictorians to reduce pressure and competition among students. An article by June Kronholz in the […]

Behind the Headline: Villaraigosa backs charter school bids, rips Cortines

On Top of the News Villaraigosa backs charter school bids, rips Cortines 06/25/10 | The Los Angeles Times Behind the Headline Palace Revolt in Los Angeles? Summer 2010 | Education Next The mayor of Los Angeles has criticized the L.A. Unified school district for not allowing more charter organizations to take over low-performing district schools […]

Behind the Headline: TAKS grade inflation is nothing new

On Top of the News TAKS grade inflation is nothing new 06/13/10 | Houston Chronicle Behind the Headline State Standards Rising in Reading but Not in Math Fall 2010 | Education Next It has been reported that the “passing” mark for some parts of the Texas state proficiency exam was altered after the results came […]

Behind the Headline: Cincinnati Public Schools to put top teachers at weak schools

On Top of the News Cincinnati Public Schools to put top teachers at weak schools 06/14/10 | Cincinnati.com Behind the Headline An Effective Teacher in Every Classroom Summer 2010 | Education Next Cincinnati teachers who receive special training to serve as “lead teachers” will no longer be able to return to their home schools, but […]

Behind the Headline: Microsoft’s Philly high school traveled rocky road

On Top of the News Microsoft’s Philly high school traveled rocky road 06/15/10 | Forbes Behind the Headline High School 2.0 Spring 2010 | Education Next Philadelphia’s School of the Future graduates its first senior class today, and every graduate is headed for an institution of higher learning. In the Spring 2010 issue of Ed […]

Behind the Headline: Some educators question if whiteboards, other high-tech tools raise achievement

On Top of the News Some educators question if whiteboards, other high-tech tools raise achievement 06/11/10 | The Washington Post Behind the Headline Bye-Bye Blackboards Summer 2010 | Education Next Expensive and interactive, whiteboards are sprouting up in classrooms across the country. But do they improve academic achievement, Stephanie McCrummen wonders in the Washington Post. […]

Behind the Headline: D.C. contract is just the tool to let creative, renegade teachers soar

On Top of the News D.C. contract is just the tool to let creative, renegade teachers soar 06/07/10 | The Washington Post Behind the Headline Palace Revolt in Los Angeles? Summer 2010 | Education Next The new teachers contract in D.C. will give innovative teachers an opportunity to prove that they can help poor kids […]

Behind the Headline: Why should education be exempt from recession budgeting?

On Top of the News Why should education be exempt from recession budgeting? 06/06/10 | The Washington Post Behind the Headline The Phony Funding Crisis Winter 2010 | Education Next George Will writes that before Congress agrees to spend another $23 billion to prevent teachers from being laid off, “it should read ‘The Phony Funding […]

Behind the Headline: 1 competitor, 1 spelling bee — 20,000 note cards

On Top of the News 1 competitor, 1 spelling bee — 20,000 note cards 05/31/10 | The Boston Globe Behind the Headline Competition Makes a Comeback Summer 2010 | Education Next With the National Spelling Bee just days away, attention has turned to its talented and dedicated competitors – including Tim Ruiter, one of the […]

No Federal Case

Court says charter school is not a state actor

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

An Effective Teacher in Every Classroom

A lofty goal, but how to do it?

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Competition Makes a Comeback

Academic bees and bowls attract top students

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

State Standards Rise in Reading, Fall in Math

Most state standards remain far below international level

View the Underlying Data

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

Behind the Headline: Slow learners at the 9th Circuit

On Top of the News Slow learners at the 9th Circuit 05/18/10 | The Washington Post Behind the Headline Credits Crunched Fall 2009 | Education Next On Thursday the Supreme Court will consider whether to reverse a ruling by the 9th Circuit that Arizona’s tax credit program violates the Establishment clause. “Surely this question was […]

Ed Next Research Finds NCLB Has Produced Substantial National Gains In Math Skills

Landmark federal law responsible for gains in math among low-income and Hispanic students, but had no impact on reading achievement.

Evaluating NCLB

Accountability has produced substantial gains in math skills but not in reading

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Behind the Headline: School Factors May Influence Teacher Effectiveness

On Top of the News School Factors May Influence Teacher Effectiveness 05/17/10 | Teacher Beat Behind the Headline An Effective Teacher in Every Classroom Summer 2010 | Education Next A new study by C. Kirabo Jackson finds that teachers who are effective in one school might not be as effective in other kinds of schools–schools […]

Competition and Charters Spur Innovation

School markets are creative, not static

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Summer 2010 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Out of the Mainstream

Staying there isn’t easy

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Edutopian Vision

George Lucas reimagines the American classroom

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Report Raises Questions about Standards of “Race to the Top” Winners

Education Next rates Each State’s Proficiency Standards; finds that Race to the Top Winners Delaware and Tennessee get a ‘C’ and an ‘F’, respectively

Behind the Headline: Mass. hunting for star teachers

On Top of the News Mass. hunting for star teachers 05/10/10 | Boston Globe Behind the Headline An Effective Teacher in Every Classroom Summer 2010 | Education Next Massachusetts will today announce a new effort to recruit hundreds of successful teachers to work in 35 low-performing schools in Boston and other school districts. In the […]

Fueling the Engine

Smarter, better ways to fund education innovators

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Charter Schools, Traditional Public Schools Similarly Segregated

Flawed comparisons lead Civil Rights Project to unwarranted conclusions

A Closer Look at Charter Schools and Segregation

Flawed comparisons lead to overstated conclusions

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Bye-Bye Blackboards

Interactive and expensive, whiteboards come to the classroom

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

School-Finance Reform in Red and Blue

Where the money goes depends on who’s running the state

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Behind the Headline: U.S. Falls Short in Measure of Future Math Teachers

On Top of the News U.S. Falls Short in Measure of Future Math Teachers 04/15/10 | The New York Times Behind the Headline The Mystery of Good Teaching Spring 2002 | Education Next A new study finds that America’s future math teachers have less knowledge of math than their counterparts in other countries. An article […]

Look in the Mirror

Review of William A. Fischel’s Making the Grade

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Behind the Headline: Obama’s plan to reward schools for innovation sparks debate

On Top of the News Obama’s plan to reward schools for innovation sparks debate 04/14/10 | The Washington Post Behind the Headline Toothless Reform? Spring 2010 | Education Next The U.S. Department of Education is embracing an approach to spending that rewards states and districts for innovating instead of simply disbursing funds by formula to […]

Behind the Headline: Teachers agree to shorten LAUSD school year

On Top of the News Teachers agree to shorten LAUSD school year 04/11/10 | Los Angeles Times Behind the Headline Time for School? Winter 2010 | Education Next The teachers union in L.A. has ratified a deal that will shorten the school year this year and next as a cost-saving measure. As reported in the […]

Equal Knowledge

Review of E. D. Hirsch Jr.’s The Making of Americans

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Surviving a Midlife Crisis

Advanced placement turns fifty

Winter 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 1

Palace Revolt in Los Angeles?

Charter school and Latino leaders push unions to innovate

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Behind the Headline: Budget cuts could lead to fewer options at Florida Virtual

On Top of the News Budget cuts could lead to fewer options at Florida Virtual 03/24/10 | The Gradebook Behind the Headline Florida’s Online Option Summer 2009 | Education Next The Florida Legislature is considering cutting Florida Virtual School’s per-student funding and limiting the length of time students may take to complete courses. An article […]

Charter High Schools

Promising results from charters that educate teens

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Spring 2010 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Total Student Load

Review of William Ouchi’s The Secret of TSL

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

New Study Finds State Funded Universal Kindergarten Provides Some Benefits for White Students but no Positive Impact for African American Students

Large state investments in universal early-childhood education programs do not necessarily yield clear benefits for more disadvantaged students

What Happened When Kindergarten Went Universal?

Benefits were small and only reached white children

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Dedicated, Decorated, and Disappointing

Review of Rafe Esquith’s Lighting Their Fires

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Strange Bedfellows

Students find unexpected ally in the Christian Right

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Audio Book Excerpts

Authors reading short excerpts from their recent books

Charter Schools Show Increased Rates of High School Graduation and College Enrollment, According to New Study

In the first-ever analysis of the impacts of charter school attendance on educational attainment, educational researchers find that attending charter high schools is associated with higher graduation rates and college attendance.

The Unknown World of Charter High Schools

New evidence suggests they are boosting high school graduation and college attendance rates

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

A Courageous Look at the American High School

The legacy of James Coleman

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Tale of Two Cities

Review of Gerald Grant’s Hope and Despair in the ?American City

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

High School 2.0

Can Philadelphia’s School of the Future live up to its name?

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Finding Time for Tennis and Thoreau

My online education

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Straddling the Democratic Divide

Will reforms follow Obama’s spending on education?

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Can Catholic Schools Be Saved?

Lacking nuns and often students, a shrinking system looks for answers

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

In the Wake of the Storm

How vouchers came to the Big Easy

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Voucher Supporters Achieve Political Success in Louisiana

In a decade in which many school voucher programs have been limited or rolled back in Washington, DC, Utah, Arizona, and Florida, the Louisiana legislature in 2008 passed a new voucher program for New Orleans. In 2009-10, the second year of the voucher program, 1,324 New Orleans students attended 31 private schools using vouchers with a maximum value of over $7,000.

The Why Chromosome

How a teacher’s gender affects boys and girls

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

The School Lunch Lobby

A charmed federal food program that no longer just feeds the hungry

Summer 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 3

Race to the Top Offers Last Chance to Salvage Stimulus Spending

As states catch their breath after rushing to meet the January 19 deadline for submitting applications for the first round of Race to the Top grants, education researcher Andy Smarick of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute warns that the administration must take steps to ensure that Race to the Top funds are spent in ways that promote reform.

Scrap the Sacrosanct Salary Schedule

How about more pay for new teachers, less for older ones?

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Political Educator

Paul Vallas pays the price of leadership

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

New Education Next Forum: Are Boys Being Shortchanged in K-12 Schooling?

After decades of concern that girls were being shortchanged in male-dominated schools, there has grown a rising chorus of voices worrying about whether boys are the ones in peril. Richard Whitmire, author of Why Boys Fail, and Susan McGee Bailey, principal author of the 1992 report How Schools Shortchange Girls debate whether schools are now shortchanging boys.

Gender Gap

Are boys being shortchanged in K–12 schooling?

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

A Steeper, Better Road to Graduation

It’s time for America to adopt European-style exit exams

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Quality Counts Grades Unfair to Poor States, Researchers Argue

As Education Week magazine prepares to release its annual report card for states, Quality Counts 2010, education researcher Margaret Raymond and a team of researchers from CREDO at Stanford University warn that one set of grades on the report card is not reliable.

Quality Counts and the Chance-for-Success Index

Narrowing its scope to factors schools can control would give the measure greater value

Spring 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 2

Same Old, Same Old

New union leadership does not change a thing

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Demography as Destiny?

Hispanic student success in Florida

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Cheating to the Test

What to do about it

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

The Future of No Child Left Behind

End it? Or mend it?

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Brighter Choices in Albany

Reformers in New York’s capital have brought high-quality charter schools to scale, giving hope to a generation of disadvantaged kids.

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Teacher Training, Tailor-Made

Top candidates win customized teacher education

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Wave of the Future

Why charter schools should replace failing urban schools

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

The Big Stick

How Chicago reversed its descent

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

An Appeal to Authority

The new paternalism in urban schools

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Time for School?

When the snow falls, test scores also drop

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Hope after Katrina

Will New Orleans become the new city of choice?

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Education Data in 2025

Fifteen years hence, we will know exactly how well our schools, teachers, and students are doing

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Supreme Modesty

From strip searches to school funding, the Court treads lightly

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

A Recession for Schools

Not as bad as it sounds

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Virtual Schools

Will education technology change the role of the teacher and the nature of learning?

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Can Tracking Improve Learning?

Evidence from Kenya

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Lost Opportunities

Lawmakers threaten D.C. scholarships despite evidence of benefits

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Learning Separately

The case for single-sex schools

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Security Detail

An inside look at school discipline

Summer 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 3

The Accidental Principal

What doesn’t get taught at ed schools?

Summer 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 3

The Big U-Turn

How to bring schools from the brink of doom to stellar success

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Teacher Retirement Benefits

Even in economically tough times, costs are higher than ever.

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Return of the Thought Police?

The history of teacher attitude adjustment

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Charters as Role Models

The charter school movement turns 14

this year, and its behavior, some might say, is “developmentally

appropriate.”

Summer 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 3

Winter 2010 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Winter 2010 Book Alert

Intelligence and How to Get It; Liberating Learning; Unlearned Lessons; Leading for Equity

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Findings from the City of Big Shoulders

Younger Students Learn More in Charter Schools

Fall 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 4

Poor Schools or Poor Kids?

To some, fixing education means taking on poverty and health care

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Dollars and Sense

What a Tennessee experiment tells us about merit pay

Winter 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 1

Many Schools Are Still Inadequate, Now What?

Is court involvement in school spending essential to reform, or can we use education funding to drive reforms that promise better outcomes for students?

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Portfolio Assessment

Can it be used to hold schools accountable?

Summer 2004 / Vol. 4, No. 3

Fraud in School Lunch Program Not Just About Free Lunches

In a time of penny pinching inspired by tight state and local education budgets, investigative reporter David Bass warns that taxpayers are picking up the tab for a large number of ineligible students who participate in the federal school-lunch program. Even more problematic may be the effect on school funding formulas, on research, and on accountability measures.

The Bostonian

Tom Payzant’s focused approach to school reform

Summer 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 3

Public School Pension Plans Penalize Teachers who Move Jobs across States with Significant Retirement Losses, Researchers Find

In examining pension plans in six states, Costrell and Podgursky find that compared to a neutral cash balance system, the type of defined benefit pension system which covers almost all public school teachers redistributes about half the pension wealth of an entering cohort of teachers to those who subsequently retire in their mid-50s from those who leave the system earlier.

The Turnaround Fallacy

Stop trying to fix failing schools. Close them and start fresh.

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Examining a Massacre

Columbine by Dave Cullen
As reviewed by Nathan Glazer

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

D.C.’s Braveheart

Can Michelle Rhee wrest control of the D.C. school system from decades of failure?

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Dining Family Style

Meaningful dinner conversation can be hard to come by

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

The Case for Special Education Vouchers

Parents should decide when their disabled child needs a private placement

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Fraud in the Lunchroom?

Federal school-lunch program may not be a reliable measure of poverty

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

“Snow Day” Effect Lowers Test Scores, Complicates Accountability, Researchers Find

Researchers Dave Marcotte and Benjamin Hansen summarize new evidence that expanding instructional time is as effective as other commonly discussed educational interventions intended to boost learning.

What Happens When States Have Genuine Alternative Certification?

We get more minority teachers and test scores rise

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Try, Try Again

Forced busing didn’t work the first time

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Accountability Overboard

Massachusetts poised to toss out the nation’s most successful reforms

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Magnet Schools

No longer famous, but still intact

Spring 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 2

Golden Handcuffs

Teachers who change jobs or move pay a high price

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Fueled by Federal Stimulus Package, Education Spending Will Likely Increase over Next Decade despite Lack of Achievement Gains for Students

The nation’s public schools will likely have more money and a larger and better paid labor force than they had in 2009

The Phony Funding Crisis

Even in the worst of times, schools have money to spend

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Florida’s Online Option

Virtual school offers template for reform

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

In Low-Income Schools, Parents Want Teachers Who Teach

In affluent schools, other things matter

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

New York City Charter Schools

Who attends them and how well are they teaching their students?

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

New York City’s Education Battles

The mayor, the schools, and the “rinky-dink candy store”

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Accountability Lost

Student learning is seldom a factor in school board elections

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Few States Set World-Class Standards

In fact, most render the notion of proficiency meaningless

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

The Near End of Bilingual Education

In the wake of California’s Prop 227

Fall 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 4

A Foundation Goes to School

Bill and Melinda Gates shift from computers in libraries to reform in high schools

Winter 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 1

Evidence Doesn’t Support Investment in School Turnaround Efforts

New school start ups and replications of high performing charter school models provide a better solution

A School Built for Horace

Theodore R. Sizer and Nancy Faust Sizer

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Skewed Perspective

What we know about teacher preparation at elite education schools

Winter 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 1

Getting Ahead by Staying Behind

An evaluation of Florida’s program to end social promotion

Spring 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 2

The International PISA Test

States should think twice before paying for more testing. There are easier ways to compare students to their global peers.

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

An A-Maze-ing Approach To Math

A mathematician with a child learns some politics

Spring 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 2

Education Next Profiles D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee

Can Michelle Rhee Wrest Control of the D.C. School System from Decades of Failure?

E Pluribus Unum?

Two longtime school reformers debate the merits of a national curriculum

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Researchers Find Special Education Voucher Programs Ensure Better Services and Outcomes for Students

In a feature article for the winter 2010 issue of Education Next, education researchers Jay P. Greene and Stuart Buck of the University of Arkansas dispel several common myths about these programs and show how they have benefited handicapped children in states where they have been enacted, including those not in private placements.

Why Big Impact Entrepreneurs Are Rare

The dangers of challenging power

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

The Persuadable Public

The 2009 Education Next-PEPG Survey asks if information changes minds about school reform.

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Peterson and Finn Podcast Archive

Archive of Podcasts featuring Paul Peterson and Checker Finn

Work Hard. Be Nice.

The roots and reality of the Knowledge Is Power Program

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

The Vallas Effect

The supersized superintendent moves to the Superdome city

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

No Country for Strong Men

California unions tame the Terminator

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Disappearing Ink

What happens when the education reporter goes away?

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Powerful Professors

Research can change the political agenda…if the circumstances are right

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

New Leaders for Troubled Schools

Jacquelyn Davis works with D.C.’s education bureaucracy

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The Waiting Game

Will school districts hire New Leaders?

Summer 2004 / Vol. 4, No. 3

Teacher Cooperatives

What happens when teachers run the school?

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Can Johnny Graduate from College?

Crossing the Finish Line by William G. Bowen, Matthew M. Chingos, and Michael S. McPherson
As reviewed by Russ Whitehurst

Winter 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 1

Law and Disorder in the Classroom

Emphasis on student rights continues in classrooms even when the Court begins to think otherwise

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Fall 2009 Book Alert

Alternative Routes to Teaching; When Mayors Take Charge; From A Nation at Risk to No Child Left Behind; Inside Urban Charter Schools; The Role and Impact of Public-Private Partnerships in Education; The Latino Education Crisis

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Fall 2009 Correspondence

Readers Respond

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

The Preschool Picture

Universal preschool will be a boon for middle-class parents. How it will help poor kids catch up is not so obvious.

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

“Obama Effect” Strongly Influences Public Attitudes on Controversial Education Topics, according to Education Next–PEPG 2009 National Survey

Findings Show Research Evidence Can Be Equally Significant in Shaping Public Opinion. Read the full article,
The Persuadable Public, by William G. Howell, Paul E. Peterson and Martin R. West.

The 2009 Education Next-PEPG Survey

Download Complete Results Here (PDF).

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Pro-student Court Rulings Decline, Researchers Show

Many think students have more rights than courts have granted. Read the full article, Law and Disorder in the Classroom, by Richard Arum and Doreet Preiss.

Full Immersion 2025

How will 10-year-olds learn?

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Students in D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program Make Significant Improvements in Reading, U.S. Education Department Study Finds

Voucher gains are the largest achievement impacts from any federal education experiment so far. Read the full article, Lost Opportunities, by Patrick J. Wolf.

Credits Crunched

Arizona rulings hit scholarships and special education vouchers

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Reward Less, Get Less

Student performance gaps are easily explained

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Educating African American Boys

Our schools deserve an “F”

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Domino Effect

Domestic violence harms everyone’s kids

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

How to Get the Teachers We Want

Specialization would lead to better teaching and higher salaries

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Breaking Down School Budgets

Following the dollars into the classroom

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell

The answer may be luck, genes, and more

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

Race and Education, 1954—2007, by Raymond Wolters & Steady Gains and Stalled Progress, edited by Katherine Magnuson and Jane Waldfogel

Untangling race and education

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 4

When Schools Compete

Does school choice push public schools to improve?

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Virtual School Succeeds

But can we be sure about the students?

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Readers Respond

Debating Massachusetts; scaling up KIPP; practice-based teacher training; alternative certification; for-profits in Philadelphia; selling success; teacher co-ops

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Young People Are All Right

Book Review: The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Summer 2009 Book Alert

The Beautiful Tree; The Street Stops Here; Reforming Boston Schools, 1930-2006; The Leader in Me; Changing the Odds for Children at Risk

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

New Education Next Forum: Is There a Connection between School Spending and Student Achievement? Should Courts Decide?

U. S. Supreme Court decision puts issue on front burner for states. Read the full article, Many Schools Are Still Inadequate, by Eric Hanushek, Alfred Lindseth and Michael Rebell.

Educating the Public

How information affects Americans’ support for school spending and charter schools

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

The Why Question

Teachers can instill a sense of purpose

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Another Lemon

Florida’s charters under attack

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Piles of Problems

In 2006, we examined the damages from state education budget cuts. We proposed moving students in to charter schools.

When Provided with Accurate Information, Public Support for Increased Spending on Schools and Teacher Salaries Declines, Researchers Find

Read the full article, Educating the Public, by William G. Howell and Martin R. West.

Book Alert

The Beautiful Tree: A Personal Journey into How the World’s Poorest People Are Educating Themselves; The Street Stops Here: A Year at a Catholic High School in Harlem; Reforming Boston Schools, 1930-2006: Overcoming Corruption and Racial Segregation; Changing the Odds for Children at Risk: Seven Essential Principles of Educational Programs That Break the Cycle of Poverty

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

It Takes a Community

A safety net grows in Harlem

Summer 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Young People Are All Right

The problem is adolescence

Fall 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 3

Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Have a Negative Effect on the Behavior and Academic Achievement of Classroom Peers, New Study Finds

Troubled boys have a greater and more adverse impact on other boys. Read the full article, Domino Effect, by Scott Carrell and Mark Hoekstra.

For-Profit and Nonprofit Management in Philadelphia Schools

What kind of management does better than the district-run schools?

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Education Next Forum on the Future of No Child Left Behind: Mend It? Or End It?

Education Scholars Diane Ravitch and John E. Chubb Debate the Pros and Cons of the Controversial Federal Education Policy. Read the full article, The Future of No Child Left Behind, with Diane Ravitch and John E. Chubb

The Anti-intellectual Environment of American Teens

Books and ideas have no deep impact

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

What Is Good for General Motors

For years, our public schools have paid as little attention to personnel costs as General Motors has.

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

State Legislators Consider Bill to Restrict Florida Virtual School despite Growing Enrollment

Florida Virtual School reports 10-fold increase in enrollments over past ten years; nearly 50 percent growth among African-Americans since 2007. Read the full article, Florida’s Online Option, by Bill Tucker.

The Education Factor

Schooling once drove the nation’s rise to the top, but things have changed, unfortunately

Stimulus Windfall for America's Schools May Sharpen Divisions among Democrats over Reform Agenda

The Passing of a Gentle Giant

A personal tribute to John Brandl

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Book Alert

The Seduction of Common Sense:How the Right Has Framed the Debate on America's Schools; Real Leaders,Real Schools: Stories of Success Against Enormous Odds; Mobilizing the Community to Help Students Succeed; School Accountability,Autonomy, and Choice Around the World; The Future of Educational Entrepreneurship: Possibilities for School Reform

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

More Money for Less Accountability?

I don’t think so!

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Finding the Right Remedy

When court-ordered magnet schools don't work, try charters

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

The Education Factor

Schooling once drove the nation’s rise to the top, but things have changed, unfortunately

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Timeout

Schools Win in Court

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Readers Respond

Choice international; IES; Milwaukee finance; home schooling; alternative certification; union watch

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Public School Teacher Retirement Costs Significantly Higher than in Private Sector

The Accreditation Game

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (known broadly as NCATE, pronounced “en kate”) was launched in 1954 by a coalition of professional organizations from across the education community. Previously, teacher-training programs had been accredited by states, regional accrediting bodies, or an association of teacher colleges, each equipped with its own benchmarks and methods […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

School Choice International

Higher private school share boosts national test scores

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

As Popularity of Home Schooling Grows, Greater Numbers and More Diversity among Families Choosing Option

Intellectual Combat

My journey in competitive forensics

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Linky Love, Snark Attacks, and Fierce Debates about Teacher Quality?

A peek inside the education blogosphere

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Team Colors

Film explores racial divide in 1930s America

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Book Alert

So Much Reform, So Little Change: The Persistence of Failure in Urban Schools Charles M. Payne (Harvard Education Press) Payne, a sociologist at the University of Chicago, here sets out to explain “the sociology of failure” of urban reform. Drawing primarily on his experiences in Chicago, Payne considers the effects of social context, poverty, race, […]

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Reality Check

Murray's simple truths not so simple

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Purposeful Youth

Is it asking too much?

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Language Barriers

Arizonans battle federal court order to spend more

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Readers Respond

Front-loading teacher pay; California home schooling; paying students for test scores; academics and discipline; technology education for teachers

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

The Home-Schooling Special

Today's choicest choice

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Who Gains, Who Loses?

The fiscal impact of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Juggling Act

The politics of education science

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

Home Schooling Goes Mainstream

Everybody knows somebody who is teaching a child at home

Winter 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 1

States with Genuinely Alternative Teacher Certification Programs Have Greater Representation of Minority Teachers in Schools and Higher Achievement Gains among Students, New Study Finds

As Presidential Debate Highlights Need for Competition in U.S. Public Education, First-Ever Multi-National Study Shows Competition from Private Schools Improves Achievement for Both Public and Private School Students

For Public School Teachers, Evidence Supports Eliminating Pay for Credentials in Favor of Increasing Starting Salaries and Rewarding Performance Improvements

Are You Smarter Than A 5th Grader?

Fox TV show doesn’t get it

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

What Do College Students Know?

By this professor’s calculations, math skills have plummeted

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Arrested Development

Online training is the norm in other professions. Why not in K–12 education?

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Where Did NCLB Come From?

The true story of the federal role in education

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Something’s Better Than Nothing

Why technology in education doesn’t need to be very good

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Home Schoolers Strike Back

California case centers on parents' rights

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Readers Respond

Disrupting class; Governor Schwarzenegger; Reading First; New York City charters;wrong numbers; charter sector

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

The Next President Had Many School Choices

Will he provide similar opportunities for others?

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Preschool Puzzle

As state after state expands pre-K schooling, questions remain

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Out of Jail and Into Jobs

Maya Angelou Public Charter School offers hope and an education to kids in trouble

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

The Early Education of Our Next President

Not much in public schools

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Cash for Test Scores

The impact of the Texas Advanced Placement Incentive Program

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

The 2008 Education Next-PEPG Survey of Public Opinion

Americans think less of their schools than of their police departments and post offices

Fall 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

The 2008 Education Next-PEPG Survey

Responses to Additional Questions

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 4

Up or Down the Staircase?

Mentors help interns figure it out

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Opinion Leaders or Laggards?

Newspaper editorialists support charter schools, split on NCLB

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

REPN TRI to the FULLEST!!!

Teens write creatively in cyberspace but not in the classroom

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Book Alert

Lessons Learned: What International Assessments Tell Us about Math Achievement Tom Loveless, editor (Brookings Institution Press) While math scores are bandied about in the modern era, how much do we really know about what they mean or what they can teach about practice and policy? In this dense but thought-provoking volume, Brookings scholar Tom Loveless […]

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Preschool Politics

States’ efforts to reach the very young

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Peerless, Indeed

Educator’s diagnosis on the mark, 65 years later

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Court Jousters

Plaintiffs exploit weaknesses in NCLB

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Race to the Top

Business model a guide to replicating quality schools

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Scaling Up in Chile

Larger networks of schools produce higher student achievement

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

The Reading First Controversy

Promise and perils of federal leadership

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Accountability Left Behind

U.S. Court of Appeals sides with the NEA, would free districts from NCLB requirements

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Brand-Name Charters

The franchise model applied to schools

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Computer-Based Learning Could Transform Public Education within a Decade through "Disruptive Innovation," Experts Say

How Do We Transform Our Schools?

Use technologies that compete against nothing

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Vote Early, Vote Often – Figures 2 & 3

Back to the Feature

Summer 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 3

Vote Early, Vote Often – Figure 1

Back To The Feature

Summer 2005 / Vol. 5, No. 3

Americans Vastly Underestimate Spending on Schools and Teacher Salaries, Survey Finds

Is the Price Right?

Probing American’s knowledge of school spending

Summer 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 3

Screens Down

Students teach the wonders of technology

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Wikipedia or Wickedpedia?

Assessing the online encyclopedia’s impact on K–12 education

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Book Alert

The Educational Morass: Overcoming the Stalemate in American Education. Myron Lieberman (Rowman and Littlefield). The equal-opportunity, granddaddy longlegs of all curmudgeons, Myron Lieberman, manages in one volume to savage teachers unions, education schools, the Education Writers Association, the New York Times, the Washington Post, education research, egalitarian school-choice proponents, and conservatives Diane Ravitch, Terry Moe, […]

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

An honest look at union hero Albert Shanker

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Free and Appropriate

Parent's wealth muddies special-education tuition case

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Today’s Education-Industrial Complex

Why aren’t schools an issue in the 2008 election?

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Education and Economic Growth

It’s not just going to school, but learning something while there that matters

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Teachers for America

Catalysts for change or untrained temporaries?

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Voting Down Vouchers

Lessons learned from Utah

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Going for the Gold

Secrets of successful schools

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Troublemaker

The education of Chester Finn

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Charter Politics

Why some places have more students in charter schools and others have fewer

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

No Choice in Milwaukee!?!

Remarkable finding by an un-credible study

Spring 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 2

Campaign 101

Make charters a political advantage

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Let’s Talk About It

Talk radio’s take on K–12 education

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Book Alert

Pay-for-Performance Teacher Compensation: An Inside View of Denver’s ProComp Plan. Phil Gonring, Paul Teske, and Brad Jupp (Harvard Education Press). The authors have delivered a straight-shooting, inside account of the design, politics, and implementation of the much-discussed Denver ProComp teacher pay plan—a plan the Denver Post termed “the nation’s most ambitious.” Widely regarded as the […]

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Creativity Rising

Fewer slide rules, more paint brushes

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Inside the Testing Factory

Some schools make it work

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Doubtful Jurisprudence

Court offers schools little guidance

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Excellence Reformers Need to Make a Choice

Is accountability the reform of the past?

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

The Right Republican Strategy

“By…[selecting] the youths of genius from among the classes of the poor, we hope to avail the State of those talents which nature has sown as liberally among the poor as the rich, but which perish without use if not sought for and cultivated.” —Thomas Jefferson, 1782 “We need to challenge the soft bigotry of […]

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

The Democratic Take

The 2008 presidential election stands as a “change” election. The public’s anxiety over the challenges globalization poses to the future of the American Dream is driving a desire for the country to change direction. The American people understand that what will give the nation a competitive advantage in a global marketplace are the skills, creativity, […]

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Election 2008: The Education Debate

In the 2000 election, President Bush’s pledge to combat the “soft bigotry of low expectations” was a pillar of his compassionate conservatism and crucial to his razor-thin margin of victory. That election begat the now-controversial No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). The law has split the Right between those who cheer accountability and those who […]

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

St. Louis Blues

Tax credits down and out in Missouri

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Peaks, Cliffs, and Valleys

The peculiar incentives of teacher pensions

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Accountability Incentives

Do schools practice educational triage?

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

American Teachers

What values do they hold?

Winter 2008 / Vol. 8, No. 1

Photo Finish

Teacher Certification Doesn’t Guarantee a Winner

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Teacher’s Little Helper

New technologies target teacher performance

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Courts and Choice

Testing the constitutionality of charters and vouchers

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Baby, Think It Over

Technology meets abstinence education

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Urban Hero

Wrong role for school teachers

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Bum Rap

On the debate circuit with Central High

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

What Begat the Achievement Gap?

History of Chicago schools provides few answers

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

The Enforcers

Parents may gain right to sue over NCLB

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Readers Respond

Evidence-based studies; update on Los Angeles; pre-K for all;

Indianapolis needs philanthropy; in defense of

Accelerated Reader

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Good News for Presidential Candidates

The public supports a wide range of education reforms

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

The Odd Couple

Murray and Rothstein find some unexpected common ground

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Do Districts Fund Schools Fairly?

In Texas, differences are larger within districts than between

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Basically a Good Model

NCLB can be fixed

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Testing the Limits of NCLB

Implementation is not the problem

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

A Lens That Distorts

NCLB’s faulty way of measuring school quality

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Crash Course

NCLB is driven by education politics

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Will NCLB Hit the Wall?

Congress hopes to finish work on the reauthorization of the No ChildLeft Behind Act (NCLB) before the presidential primary season beginsin January 2008, though it is unclear whether that deadline will bemet. The six-year-old law was originally passed by Congress with strongbipartisan support, but now faces opposition from both the right andthe left. Can the […]

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

New Kids on the Block

Results from the Moving to Opportunity experiment

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

All Over the Map

Explaining educational outcomes of the Moving to Opportunity program

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

What Americans Think about Their Schools

The 2007 Education Next—PEPG Survey

Fall 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 4

Checking NYC’s Facts

New York’s adequacy case; underground education; North Carolina charters; the Bloomberg revolution

Winter 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 1

Education and the Economy

For more than three decades, the United States has been scoring below the international average among participating nations on tests of math and science achievement. Again and again, civic leaders have pointed to this fact when warning that a crisis in American education may imperil continued growth in economic productivity. Yet after two decades of […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Young Einsteins

Should Head Start emphasize academic skills?

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Defining Merit

How should we pay teachers?

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Politics First, Students Last

A well-heeled commission issues a weak-kneed report

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Confessions from the Classroom

How do teachers know they're working hard enough?

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Curriculum Wars

Ancient and Modern

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Three Rs and a V

Schools should teach the importance of voting

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Pressure Cooker

Teens at the top pay a price

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Readers Respond

Catholic schools; teacher dispositions; private placements; teacher certification

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

The Confidence Men

Selling adequacy, making millions

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Power Struggle in Los Angeles

The Los Angeles Unified School District once again finds itself positioned for great things—or grave disappointment. The district has an ambitious building plan, and a tough-talking retired admiral sits in the superintendent’s chair. The legislature passed a bill in 2006 that gives Mayor Villaraigosa greater control over the schools, but a lawsuit holds up his […]

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

A Ray of Hope

Politics may still save L.A. schools

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

A Murky Picture

An attempted takeover goes awry

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Pre-K 101

Who should control a four-year-old’s education — the government or parents?

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson

The Peyton Manning of charter schools

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

The Lucy Calkins Project

Parsing a self-proclaimed literacy guru

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

The Education Governor

An interview with Florida governor Jeb Bush

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

The 21 studies that generated the findings in “Civics Exam: Schools of Choice Boost Civic Values”

Campbell, David E. 2001a. “Civic Education: Readying Massachusetts’ Next Generation of Citizens.” White Paper 17, Boston: Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research. Available by request of the author, Dave_Campbell@nd.edu. ———. 2001b. “Making Democratic Education Work.” In Charters, Vouchers, and Public Education, edited by Paul E. Peterson and David E. Campbell. Washington, DC: Brookings, pp. 241-67. […]

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Civics Exam

Schools of choice boost civic values

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Adequately Fatigued

Court rulings disappoint plaintiffs

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Texas Hold’em

Secretary Spellings – the ace in Bush’s hand

Summer 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 3

Mutual Selection Beats Random Assignment

Let student teachers and mentors choose the best fit

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

The Key to Research Influence

Quality data and sound analysis matter, after all

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Book Alert

Educating School Teachers. Arthur Levine (The Education Schools Project). In this 140-page report, the former president of Teachers College, Columbia University, seeks to do for teachers what his 2005 report did for administrators: appraise the current state of their professional preparation and suggest needed reforms. The news is mostly glum: “Teacher education in the U.S. […]

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Blink. Think. Blank. Bunk.

Solid snap judgments are deeply grounded

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Readers Respond

Teacher Certification; Adequacy Studies; National Standards; Restructuring Questions; Spotlight on Newark; Kids and Exercise

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

The Entrepreneurs and the New Commission

Changing minds in the education establishment

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Debunking a Special Education Myth

Don’t blame private options for rising costs

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

What Innovators Can, and Cannot, Do

Squeezing into local markets and cutting deals

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

From Aristotle to Angelou

Best practices in character education

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Confessions of a “No Child Left Behind” Supporter

An interview with Sandy Kress

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Selling Software

How vendors manipulate research and cheat students

Spring 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 2

Not Your Father’s PE

Obesity, exercise, and the role of schools

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Readers Respond

Teacher Gender; Hope in New Orleans; Miracle Math; PE in Schools; Newark’s Cory Booker; National Standards

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Reflections on the One-Room Schoolhouse

If children showed any aptitude and ambition for learning, they were not hampered by restrictions [or] rules

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

No Business Like Show Business

Hollywood and Hip-Hop Discover Charter Schools

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Book Alert

Cutting Through the Hype: A Taxpayer’s Guide to School Reforms. Jane L. David and Larry Cuban (Education Week Press). Silver bullets come not here. In this slender, readable volume, veteran educators Jane David (now head of the Bay Area Research Group) and Larry Cuban (emeritus education professor at Stanford) conduct a breakneck tour of almost—but […]

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The “Crits” Capture Presidential Power

Top Education researchers denounce scientific research

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The Triumph of Look-Say

Dumbing-down reading instruction

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The NCES Private-Public School Study

Findings are other than they seem

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Judging Money

When courts decide how to spend taxpayer dollars

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Charters as a Solution?

So far, states and districts have opted for anything but

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Easy Way Out

“Restructured” usually means little has changed

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Preschool Is School, Sometimes

Making early childhood education matter

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Learning Facts

The brave new world of data-informed instruction

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The NCLB Restruct-a-tron

Does the law’s great big machine for overhauling schools produce anything worthwhile?

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Courtroom Alchemy

Adequacy advocates turn guesstimates into gold

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Games Charter Opponents Play

How local school boards–and their allies–block the competition

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Affirmative Action Docketed

The Supreme Court takes up race-based school assignment

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

Misdirected Energy

Schools get an A in resisting reform.

Winter 2007 / Vol. 7, No. 1

The American High School

Can it be saved?

Winter 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 1

Our Schools and Our Future

Assessments of the state of American education on the 20th anniversary of the A Nation at Risk report

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Future of School Boards

Agents of reform or defenders of the status quo?

Summer 2004 / Vol. 4, No. 3

The English Teacher

When the lack of a cohesive curriculum comes back to bite

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

The Cure

Will NCLB’s restructuring wonder drug prove meaningless?

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Book Alert

Collective Bargaining in Education: Negotiating Change in Today’s Schools. Edited by Jane Hannaway and Andrew J. Rotherham (Harvard Education Press). It is not clear what justifies use of “change” in the title of this book. Since the days of the Luddites, it has been in the nature of unions to oppose anything that jeopardizes worker […]

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Beyond the Melting Pot

Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers

By Kwame Anthony Appiah

Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny

By Amartya Sen

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Battling the Progressives

The Knowledge Deficit: Closing the Shocking Education Gap for American Children

By E. D. Hirsch, Jr.

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Thomas Payzant; union politics; Jack Jennings; high school; keeping Christians out

The Bostonian Tom Payzant had an extraordinary ten-year run as superintendent of schools in Boston, as described in Alexander Russo’s fine story (“The Bostonian,” features, Summer 2006). Although it’s hard to remember now, Boston public schools were in free fall a decade ago, with a dysfunctional school committee, a series of short-term superintendents, and a […]

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Virtual Legality

Unions and Home Schoolers Attack Internet Education

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Learning from Catastrophe Theory

What New Orleans Tells Us about Our Education Future

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Is Your Child’s School Effective?

Don’t rely on NCLB to tell you

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Political Realities

To get national standards, leaders will need to be bold

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Hoop Hassles

Incentives, not national control

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

A New New Federalism

The case for national standards and tests

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

National Standards

Should the federal government tell schools what to teach?

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Miracle Math

A successful program from Singapore tests the limits of school reform in the suburbs

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Don’t Sweat It

How some schools do — and don’t do — PE

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Home Is Where the Heart Is

Can Cory Booker save Newark's schools?

Fall 2006 / Vol. 6, No. 4

Raising Black Achievement

Vouchers and the Test-Score Gap

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

More than the Three Rs

The Head Start approach to school readiness

Head Start

The War on Poverty goes to school

The Business Model

Value-added analysis is a crucial tool in the accountability toolbox–despite its flaws

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Graduation Wish

She was asking for the barest of minimums: her child’s safety

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Civics Lesson

Diversity and Distrust: Civic Education in a Multicultural Democracy by Stephen Macedo Asking the schools to mold good citizens—again

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Distorting Dewey

Progressive ideals, lost in translation

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Evidence Matters

Linking scholarship and reform

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

RAND versus RAND

What Do Test Scores in Texas Tell Us? by Stephen P. Klein et al.

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Deconstructing RAND

Improving Student Achievement: What NAEP State Test Scores Tell Us by David W. Grissmer et al.

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Changing the Profession

How choice would affect teachers

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Hidden Demand

Who would choose private schools?

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Romancing the Child

Curing American education of its enduring belief that learning is natural

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Let the Market Decide

A 1962 RAND Corporation study on teacher pay described teacher salary schedules in the following way:

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Rewarding Expertise

For most of the century just past, and into the current one, school districts have paid their teachers according to a “single salary schedule,” a pay scheme that bases an individual teacher’s salary on two factors: years of experience (steps) and number of education credits and degrees (lanes).

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

Bear Market

The recent entry of for-profit schools into the K–12 arena is an intriguing trend.

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

The Private Can Be Public

During the 1999–2000 school year, public school districts spent some $35 billion on goods and services provided by private, for-profit businesses—about 10 percent of the nation’s annual K–12 education budget.

Spring 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 1

A Few Good Schools

Why start a charter school in the style of a military college-prep academy? Put simply, Oakland’s public high schools are a disaster.

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

The Charter Movement

Public education’s new lease on life

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Choice Lite

Learning from the New Zealand experiment

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

RAND versus Hanushek, educational McCarthyism, & more

Readers respond

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Getting a Head Start

Is preschool too early for academic instruction?

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Defrocking the National Board

Will the imprimatur of “board certification” professionalize teaching?

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Flunking ETS

The Educational Testing Service makes divining the methods of good teachers look easy. It’s not.

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Why Students in Some Countries Do Better

International evidence on the importance of education policy

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Significant, but Not Decisive

A critique

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Vouchers in Charlotte

Vouchers and the Test-Score Gap

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Vouchers in New York, Dayton, and D.C.

Vouchers and the Test-Score Gap

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Speaking in Many Tongues

The common stereotypes of Christian schools mask their healthy diversity

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

In Praise of Mediocrity

Tattered Blue Ribbons at the Department of Education

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Early Warning System

How to prevent reading disabilities

Summer 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 2

Much Too Late

Brianna and her four-year-old classmates are sitting in a circle around their preschool teacher. The teacher asks, “Who can tell me what they’re going to do when we go to our play centers?” “I’m going to work with Play-Doh,” Brianna answers. “Tell us what you’re going to make,” her teacher responds. “I want to make […]

Much Too Early

SIDEBAR: Head Start by Tyce Palmaffy.
SIDEBAR: More than the Three Rs by Edward Zigler and Sally J. Styfco.

Life Lessons

The obstacles in my path were perfect training for a teacher

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

The Mismeasure of Learning

Poorly designed high-stakes tests may undermine the standards movement

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Military academies; do teachers matter?

Readers respond

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Education Next

Our name has changed, but our mission has not

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Selective Reporting

Quality Counts 2001, A Better Balance: Standards, Tests, and the Tools to Succeed by the editors of Education Week

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Sciencephobia

Why education rejects randomized experiments

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Bowling Together

Private schools, public ends

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Reform or Be Reformed

A new agenda for the teacher unions

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

A Union by Any Other Name

The NEA and AFT will promote reforms-but only those that serve teachers interests

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Deindustrialization

Why teachers must come to regard-and organize-themselves as mind workers

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Identity Crisis

Can teacher unions really promote reform?

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Seasons Change

The shifting make-up of society and schools has already undermined the common culture

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

High-Stakes Culture

Any attempt to divine the cultural consequences of choice must recognize that the movement for educational choice has not been limited to vouchers.

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Ex Uno Plures

Public schools once taught a common culture. Now they try to teach every culture

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Choice, Testing, and the Jigsaw Society

Will school reform undermine the common culture?

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Digging Deeper

Houston has plenty of unfinished business as it transitions to new leadership an

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Balancing Act

Redefining the district's role under standards-based reform

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Taking Measure

A recent Council of the Great City Schools report hailed Houston for ‘beating the odds’ by generating sizable gains in student achievement.

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Houston Takes Off

Will success survive the Paige promotion?

Fall 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 3

Putting Parents First

A cause worth fighting for

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Choice Words

Religious schools, parental choices

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Vouchers versus class size; phonics versus whole language

Readers Respond

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

The New Education Market

Examining the early responses of public schools to competition

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

The Looming Shadow

Florida gets its “F” schools to shape up

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Rising Tide

New evidence on competition and the public schools

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Fixing Federal Research

Education demands a first-rate R & D shop. The Department of Education isn’t it-yet

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

School @ Home

Fearing conformity, violence, secularism, or simply bad teaching, more and more parents are taking their children’s education into their own hands. And more and more of their children are entering the nation’s finest institutions of higher education. Can home schoolers handle college life?

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Hero Worship

Cities look for a savior to transform their school systems, lasting reform takes a sustained, community-wide effort

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Can’t Let Go

Just a few years back, school-based management was the rage in Cleveland. Except that the central office wasn't all that interested in relinquishing control

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Old Wine, New Bottles

In Baltimore, the mayor’s lack of success at school reform led to a state takeover of the city’s schools. In Washington, D.C., mayoral control has begun to stabilize the system. So what does this tell us about the ability of city hall to run a school system?

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Round and Round They Go

Can new management save urban school districts?

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Finishing Touches

If school vouchers bettered the educational opportunities only of children who use the vouchers to attend private schools or schools in another district, many reformers would be left holding cups half empty.

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

A Work in Progress

After five years, school choice is beginning to have visible effects in Michigan’s education system.

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

The Work Ahead

Does school choice push public schools to improve?

Winter 2001 / Vol. 1, No. 4

Low Expectations

My high school was certified as “college preparatory.” I was able to take introductory calculus, advanced chemistry and biology, and even several English literature courses for college credit. I graduated as valedictorian of my decent-sized class, with just over a 3.9 GPA. However, as my father often observed with great frustration, I rarely spent my […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

“Inside Charter Schools” REVIEWED

Inside Charter Schools: The Paradox of Radical Decentralization Edited by Bruce Fuller Harvard University Press, 2000, $31.50; 288 pages. Reviewed by Patrick J. Wolf The soaring popularity of charter schools among parents, education reformers, and politicians still hasn’t convinced Bruce Fuller of their worth. Fuller, a professor of education and public policy at the University […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

A-plus for Florida?

A-Plus for vouchers? In “The Looming Shadow“ (Research, Winter 2001), Jay P. Greene of the Manhattan Institute examines whether the threat of vouchers under Florida’s A-Plus program forced the state’s failing schools to improve. The A-Plus program is essentially a top-down accountability system with a voucher add-on. The state grades schools from A to F […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Certifying the Intangible

Do we need good teachers? Don’t be silly. Of course we do. We can all recall a teacher who made a big difference in our lives. And now we have research, as reviewed in Dan Goldhaber’s Feature essay “The Mystery of Good Teaching,” which shows more clearly than ever before that the quality of the […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Positive Spin

The evidence for teacher certification.

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Cooking the Questions?

The 33rd Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Teach for America

Since 1990 the New York-based Teach for America (TFA) program has placed more than 7,000 teachers in some of the nation’s most challenging school districts. The nonprofit organization recruits high-achieving seniors from top colleges and asks them to commit themselves to two years of teaching in inner-city or rural schools. TFA currently supplies teachers to […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Randomly Accountable

Failing to account for natural fluctuations in test scores could undermine the very idea of holding schools accountable for their efforts – or lack thereof

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

The Mystery of Good Teaching

Surveying the evidence on student achievement and teachers’ characteristics.

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Tortuous Routes

The urban school districts of California have a well-publicized shortage of teachers. So they’re eager to move well-qualified candidates into the classroom, right? Not always. Nontraditional candidates-namely recent college graduates and career changers who haven’t attended a standard teacher-preparation program-often encounter serious roadblocks, even with the state’s full endorsement of alternative certification programs that allow […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

A New Partnership

The move toward federally imposed accountability standards is necessary to ensure that federal funds are enhancing educational opportunity, especially for poor and minority students. It will all be for naught, however, if Congress doesn't guarantee that states will receive the resources necessary to overhaul failing schools

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Unwarranted Intrusion

Inside the Washington, D.C., beltway, the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is seen as either a sea change in federal education policy or a half-measure designed to demonstrate the political leadership’s willingness to “do something” on education. On one side are supporters of the legislation who point to its substantial tightening […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

The Feds Step In

From his first days in office, President Bush made education reform one of his chief priorities. Congress responded with a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) that requires states to ensure that all students reach a certain level of proficiency within the next 12 years. Schools that fail to meet their achievement […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

Break the Link

Picture Gerard, a 28-year-old business consultant who majored in economics at Williams College and graduated with a 3.7 GPA. Gerard has been working for a consulting firm in Stamford, Connecticut, but is looking for a new, more fulfilling position. He has demonstrated strong interpersonal skills and work habits. In addition, though he didn’t major in […]

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

A Tenuous Hold

Education schools have lost the confidence of the public

and policymakers alike. They'll need to relinquish their

monopoly on teacher preparation in order to gain it back

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

The Certification Connection

Licensure ought to guarantee that every classroom comes

equipped with a skilled, knowledgeable teacher. The new

performance standards for teachers are making that possible

Spring 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 1

In the Shadow of Terror

Life returns to not quite normal at Stuyvesant High

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Surface Wounds

Revolution at the Margins: The Impact of Competition on Urban School Systems By Frederick M. Hess Brookings Institution, 2002, $45.95; 268 pages. As reviewed by Edward B. Fiske For the most part, the language of economics has informed the public debate over school choice. Free-market economist Milton Friedman was the first to develop the concept […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Data Vacuum

School Vouchers: Examining the Evidence By Martin Carnoy Economic Policy Institute, 2002. Rhetoric Versus Reality: What We Know and What We Need to Know About Vouchers and Charter Schools By Brian Gill, P. Michael Timpane, Karen Ross, and Dominic Brewer RAND Corporation, 2001. School Vouchers: Publicly Funded Programs in Cleveland and Milwaukee General Accounting Office, […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

NCATE responds

Quick fix Margaret Raymond and Stephen Fletcher’s findings (“Teach for America,” Research, Spring 2002) from their initial evaluation of Teach for America (TFA) are not too surprising, given the makeup of TFA recruits and the teachers with whom they are being compared. They find that TFA recruits in Houston are “at least as effective as […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Two Steps Forward?

Although September 11 briefly arrested the nation’s work on domestic issues, 2002 is still shaping up as a significant year for education reformers. When President Bush affixed his signature to the No Child Left Behind Act on January 8, 2002, he arguably brought to life the most important piece of federal education legislation since 1965. […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Waiting for Utopia

It’s easy to tell when someone is in the grip of a Big Idea That Explains Everything. Tunnel vision sets in; every analysis, whatever the topic, becomes an occasion for the grand theory to appear. Evidence is read and supplied selectively, in such a way that the theory re-mains unscathed. Skepticism is deployed selectively as […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Unrequited Promise

Tracing the evolution of New American Schools, from feisty upstart to bulwark of the education establishment

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

The Power of Peers

What does the term “peer effects” mean in a school environment? It includes the effects of students’ teaching one another, but that is only the most direct form of peer effects. Intelligent, hard-working students can affect their peers through knowledge spillovers and through their influence on academic and disciplinary standards in the classroom. Alternatively, misbehaving […]

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Monster Hype

School violence, the media’s phantom epidemic

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Swing State

The downs and ups of accountability in California

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Bipartisan Schoolmates

President Bush forges a consensus on federal education policy

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

The Supreme School Board

Vouchers on Trial

A view from inside the courtroom

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Vouchers on Trial

Will the Supreme Court’s decision in Zelman end the debate?

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Enemy of the Good

No standardized test is perfect. But they’re useful nonetheless

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Expert Measures

All the evidence to date shows that value-added techniques are being employed responsibly

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Sizing Up Test Scores

The latest innovation in measuring the performance of schools and teachers holds great promise, but the idea is still way ahead of our ability to execute it

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Accountability Gains

Are we measuring achievement gains accurately enough?

Summer 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 2

Full Court Press

Photograph courtesy of Howard Fuller. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, if you were a black basketball player in Milwaukee and thought you “had game,” there were two playgrounds to establish your credentials: Franklin Square and Lapham Park. I spent many hours on both courts. Although there are new playgrounds today, the tradition continues. I […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Women’s Work

Kingdom of Children

Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement

by Mitchell L. Stevens

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Choice Words

Catholic Schools: Private and Social Effects Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000, $100; 160 pages By William Sander The Education Gap: Vouchers and Urban Schools Brookings Institution, 2002, $28.95; 275 pages By William G. Howell and Paul Peterson, with Patrick J. Wolf and David E. Campbell As reviewed by R. Kenneth Godwin The advantage of reading The Education Gap and Catholic Schools together is in […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

New American Schools; bullying and school violence

New American Schools; bullying and school violence

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Credible Cassandras

High-school graduation rates are slipping? Can this be? Or is Chicken Little at it again? After rising for more than 100 years, reports Duncan Chaplin in our lead feature “Tassels on the Cheap,” graduation rates started to slip during the 1970s. By the turn of the century, the graduation rate had dropped 7 percentage points […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Dodging the Questions

Somehow I expected more. When I challenged Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) and Gallup’s claim that they had discovered a “significant decline” in voucher support, I figured they would respond with detailed justifications of their procedures and findings. But they haven’t done that. Their response reads more like an exercise in public relations than a serious […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Responsible Polling

The issue that Terry Moe raises in his article “Cooking the Questions” in the Spring 2002 issue of Education Next concerns Phi Delta Kappa’s interpretations of findings from the 2001 Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll of the public’s attitudes toward education. In a press release, Phi Delta Kappa concluded, “It is clear that the decade of […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Quantity over Quality

Ever-declining class sizes and teachers’ dwindling pay have a common explanation: the increasing price of skilled labor

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Learning English

New evidence on the effectiveness of bilingual education

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Unruly Crew

Federal legislation can move the states quite far, even if they don’t ally comply with the letter of the law.

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

The Virtues of Randomness

Illustration by Craig Frazier. The principle that social interventions ought to be evaluated has a long pedigree. Eager readers of the Muquadimah know that Ibn Khaldun considered competing explanations for the success of Arab regimes in the 13th century. In the 19th century, Florence Nightingale reproved the English Parliament for failing to weigh seriously the […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Educational Jujitsu

Illustration by Dan Vasconcellos. In their continuing efforts to extract more school spending from state legislatures through the courts, advocacy groups recently acquired a powerful new weapon: the standards movement. Their success provides yet another example of the law of unintended consequences. Recently, plaintiffs in two prominent cases, in New York and North Carolina, successfully […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Tassels on the Cheap

Illustration by John Weber. For more than a century the Department of Education has collected data on the number of high-school diplomas awarded each year. A statistic called the “degree ratio” can readily be calculated by combining these data with population figures from the U.S. Census. The degree ratio is the number of high-school diplomas […]

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Barren Land

During the past four decades, poor countries worldwide have experienced a massive expansion of education. But the global mandarins who thought education would lead to surging economies have been sorely disappointed

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

The Seeds of Growth

The United States became the world’s economic superpower over the course of the 20th century. But can today’s education system be counted on to fertilize growth in the future?

Fall 2002 / Vol. 2, No. 3

Much Ado About Something

Teaching students how to read the classics

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Education Matters: Selected Essays

Education Matters: Selected Essays by Alan B. Krueger

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

The GED; value-added testing; and California accountability

The GED; value-added testing; and California accountability

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Siegfried and the Urban Education Dragon

Illustration by Chris Gall. Few urban school superintendents remain in place for long nowadays. According to the Council of the Great City Schools, they last an average of 2.5 years. Like mythological children sent to appease the ravening monster, the chief education officers are ready sacrifices offered up when things go badly. Replacing the person […]

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Lobbying in Disguise

Do Charter Schools Measure Up? The Charter School Experiment After 10 Years by the American Federation of Teachers

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

The Human Capital Century

Has U.S. leadership come to an end?

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

High Stakes in Chicago

Illustration by Noah Woods. As the first large urban school district to introduce a comprehensive accountability system, Chicago provides an exceptional case study of the effects of high-stakes testing-a reform strategy that will become omnipresent as the No Child Left Behind Act is implemented nationwide. One of the most serious criticisms of high-stakes testing is […]

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Fanatical Secularism

The missionaries in public schools

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Choice & Freedom

Nobel Laureate economist Milton Friedman was among the first (John Stuart Mill made a similar proposal 100 years earlier) to propose that the financing of education be separated from the administration of schools, the core idea behind school vouchers. In a famous 1955 essay, Friedman argued that there is no need for government to run […]

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

The Philadelphia Experiment

The story behind Philadelphia’s Edison contract

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Reaching the Ideal

Special education has its problems, but they mainly follow from the failure of schools to comply fully with the law

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Sisyphean Tasks

Illustration by Elizabeth Lada. In a recent report for the Abell Foundation, Kalman R. Hettleman documented the troubled history of special education in the Baltimore public school system. He attributed the failure to “the compliance maze” that special education teachers and administrators face, which consists of “ever-proliferating procedures, forms to be filled out, micro-managed administrative […]

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Special Needs

Can special ed be held accountable too?

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Yellow Flag

The charter school movement will need to overcome a raft of political obstacles and high-profile scandals

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Friendly Competition

Does the presence of charters spur public schools to improve?

Winter 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 1

Charters Beset

New obstacles to continuing growth

Winter 2003/ Vol. 3, No. 1

Honest Abe

Lincoln taught himself the three R’s and more

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Out of Balance

School Choice Tradeoffs: Liberty, Equity, and Diversity by By R. Kenneth Godwin and Frank R. Kemerer University of Texas Press, 2002, $29.95; 315 pages. America lacks a theory that would explain how its current system of public schooling could function at an acceptable level. Such a theory would describe how the several components of schooling finances, administration, curriculum, teaching, […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Greek Lessons

Gymnastics of the Mind: Greek Education in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt by Raffaella Cribiore Princeton University Press, 2001, $39.50; 288 pages. In Rome, toward the end of the 1st century C.E., Quintus Sulpicius Maximus, an 11-year-old boy, won honorable mention in a poetry contest by improvising some 43 verses in ancient Greek on a mythological […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

AFT and NCATE respond

The AFT responds The American Federation of Teachers’ report Do Charter Schools Measure Up? has been sharply criticized by special-interest groups advocating on behalf of charter schools. In “Lobbying in Disguise” (Check the Facts, Winter 2003), Robert Maranto joins this discordant chorus. But Maranto and the AFT agree on a number of points: • Charter […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Erosion Continues

In 1983, a blue-ribbon education commission appointed by Ronald Reagan’s first Secretary of Education, Terrel H. Bell, announced that America’s “educational institutions seem to have lost sight of the basic purposes of schooling, and of the high expectations and disciplined effort needed to attain them.” In its report, A Nation at Risk, the National Commission […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Lost Opportunity

Increased economic growth, fueled by improvements in student performance, might have funded the nation’s entire K–12 education budget by now

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Ignoring the Market

Photograph by Stephanie Kuykendal. A Nation at Risk‘s most fatal flaw was its faith in the American education system’s ability to act on its recommendations. The authors of Risk believed that the system was mainly in need of internal reforms: tougher coursework and graduation requirements, higher and more flexible salaries for teachers, a longer school […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Accountability Unplugged

Illustration by Stuart Bradford. A Nation at Risk foreshadowed the modern accountability movement. While the word “accountability” never appears in Risk, its call for higher academic standards and its focus on student achievement as the main barometer of quality laid the intellectual groundwork for the rigorous curricula and tests envisioned by the promoters of standards-based […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Least Common Denominator

The effort to push underprepared students into academic courses has driven the rigor out of many textbooks and classrooms

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Not So Grand a Strategy

A Nation at Risk emphasized the importance of learning so-called “higher-order skills” in the early grades. But even chess grand masters need to learn the basics first.

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

High Hurdles

The authors of A Nation at Risk recognized a fundamental truth of education: that reforms, if they are to be successful, must reach into education’s inner sanctum, the classroom.

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Reform Blockers

Why the status quo almost always wins

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Chasm Remains

Minority students are becoming increasingly concentrated in urban school districts. During the 1990-91 school year, 40 of the 57 districts that are members of the Council of the Great City Schools reported student populations in which minority students composed the majority. By the 1997-98 school year, the number had risen to 46 districts. Though there […]

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Reforms for Whom?

The core of A Nation at Risk was its concern that America’s public schools were not challenging enough to prepare students for a future built on technology and information.

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Ticket to Nowhere

In the wake of A Nation at Risk, educators pledged to focus anew on student achievement. Two decades later, little progress has been made

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

A Landmark Revisited

“Education reforms are useless unless our kids take responsibility for their education,” legendary union leader Albert Shanker wrote a decade ago.

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Test of Time

A Nation at Risk was an historic document—for its time. Now we know that while its findings were dead on, its reform agenda relied too much on the existing system

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Help Wanted

Choice, accountability, and transparency will mean little without a new generation of school-based leaders to light the way

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Unrecognized Progress

“It is high time that we commit the full resources required to improve every school in America, so that every child is at grade level or above”

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

The Long Haul

It will take prolonged effort and more than just school reforms to boost student achievement

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Leftover Business

That the nation is still debating—and has yet to address—many of the issues raised by A Nation at Risk is a testament to its prescience

Spring 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 2

Are We Still at Risk

Students d